The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

poolish: fridge or counter?

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sallam's picture
sallam

poolish: fridge or counter?

Greetings


I use a 100% hydration yeast poolish to make my whole wheat dough. I need to know whether a poolish should be allowed to over-ferment or should we move it to the fridge once it doubles?


I ask because I'm living in a warm weather, and my poolish collapses if allowed to develop after getting doubled in height. What is your recommendation regarding this?

flournwater's picture
flournwater

I let mine rest on the counter over night.  But if it were doubling as fast as you describe I would refrigerate it and allow it to develop more slowly, then bring it back to room temp (75 degrees +/-) before using it.

Cooking202's picture
Cooking202

I have never used a poolish when making wheat bread, please tell me the difference in this and the straight forward mix, rise and bake method.  Let me be totally honest, I have never used a poolish or biga period.  Does it have an effect on the flavor?  Thanks


Carol

Pjacobs's picture
Pjacobs

Carol, You will discover that using a poolish, letting the preferment set covered on your counter 8-9 hours, will vastly improve the taste of your bread. I prefer to make a polish and a soaker and let them set over night on the counter covered with Seranrap or a towel, and then make bread the next day--if I get up early, I do it all in one day. I usually combine 10 oz of flour with 12 oz of water, a pinch of yeast and a pinch of sugar-well stirred. For the soaker I combine 20 oz flour and 12 oz with water and let the two sit side by side for 9 hours. Then I put them in the mixing bowl of my KA, add 10 more oz of flour, three tbls of sugar, 1 teasoon of salt, 1 oz of cake yeast and 1/4 cup of olive oil. I let the dough hook have it for 2 minutes, then I stop the mixer and let the dough autolyse for 20 minutes, then I turn the machine back on for an additional 10-12 minutes. At this point I remove the dough, which is sticky, to a floured table, knead it by hand for a couple of minutes and put it in an oiled bowl to rise-- depending on the temperature about 30 minutes to an hour. When is has doubled, I pick it up and fold it a couple of times and return it to the bowl to rise a second time. When doubled, I take it out of the bowl and cut it into three equal pieces and roll them into balls and let them rest under a damp towel for 10-15 minutes, them I form them into loaves--any shape I want and bake them at 450 degrees for 30 minutes. I hope this helps.


Phil Jacobs

Cooking202's picture
Cooking202

Phil,


Thank you so much for this great explanation, I am going to start my poolish and soaker around 10 p.m. and bake in the morning.  My family eats mostly whole grain bread and I can't wait to try this.  What I bake normally has a tiny bit of a bitter taste, perhaps this will take care of that.


Thanks again,


Carol

Pjacobs's picture
Pjacobs

Carol,


Thanks for the note. Please let me know how it turns out for you. I have won a few bread contests over the years with that recipie and it should work just fine for you. Good Luck and happy baking. If you dough is sticky it should be. Do Not Add any more flour or you could wind up with something resembling a hockey puck. Flour your hands and you should be fine.


Phil

Zootalaws's picture
Zootalaws

But where I live it doesn't go below 25C at night and can be as high as 30c in my kitchen.

I keep it in the fridge overnight, then bring out what I need and leave it to warm up for a few hours.