The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

molasses in hawaii, sourdough cure?

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Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

molasses in hawaii, sourdough cure?

Molasses is heavy and a blanket of death at the bottom.  Wonder what would happen if sourdough was introduced?  

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

in seawater and would likely stunt the effect of SD.  Now a fresh water SD spill could be a different story - one where SD took over a beach adn maybe an entire Island :-)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

we have had folks here make sd bread using sea water.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that are still alive would eat the SD.  I use SD balls for fish bait.  They love it!  At least fresh water fish do!  Still.... I thank it would be a good thing and use for Fresh Lofians to ship their discarded starter to Hawaii just in case :-) Folks are always looking for another way to use it up rather than throw it away.

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

Excerpted from this website:

HOW MOONSHINE GOT ITS NAME

In America the synonym for moonshine is hooch, a word apparently borrowed into English ca. 1867 from the Hoochinoo tribe of Alaska, noted for its homemade liquor.

An unquenchable thirst for alcoholic beverages in Alaska gave the word hooch to the English language. It began after the U.S. purchase of Alaska in 1867, when Congress prohibited the sale of alcoholic beverages in the territory.

Unable to buy alcohol, the Tlingit Indians living in a village by the name of Xutsnuuwú (Hoochinoo in English) on Admiralty Island, Alaska, began making their own.

It is mentioned in an 1869 report on seal and salmon fisheries: "The natives manufacture by distillation from molasses a vile, poisonous life and soul destroying decoction called 'hoochinoo.'"

During the Alaska Gold Rush of the 1890s, hoochinoo was shortened to hooch and made popular by the appetites and tales of the fortune seekers.

An 1897 book, Pioneers of the Klondyke, says, "The manufacture of 'hooch,' which is undertaken by the saloon-keepers themselves, is weirdly horrible."

Another describes the "hoochinoo" of the time as "made out of molasses or beans or rice or flour or anything that'll ferment.

I call it squirrel whisky, because two drinks of it makes you want to climb a tree."

Ever since, hooch has been an uncomplimentary name for illegal or at least ill-tasting alcoholic beverages.

It is used primarily in the northern and western parts of the United States, presumably by neighbors and descendants of those who returned from the Klondike.

Wild-Yeast

P.S. The fermenting agent was sourdough.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

molasses contaminated sea water may horribly intoxicate the fish?  

No wonder there are warning of possible shark attacks.  I would not want to meet a drunk shark while driving diving.

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

When sourdough ferments molasses it produces a plethora of Hydrogen-Sulfide gas making the odor of the fermenting mash "weirdly horrible". Somehting you really want to do outside and away from any breathing organism...,

Wild-Yeast

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

make for some fine old time spirits that George Washington was famous for as the largest distiller in America. 

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast