The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pistachio, Prune and Pumpkin Seed Multigrain Sourdough with Malty Toads

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Pistachio, Prune and Pumpkin Seed Multigrain Sourdough with Malty Toads

We went with another multigrain white bread this week but instead of putting ground sesame and flax seeds in it we went with the 3 P’s: pistachios, prunes and pumpkin seeds.   This bread is the equivalent of 38% whole grains due to the Toadies and malts.

 

We decided to go with our multigrain sourdough starter instead of the SD, YW and poolish combo starter from last week and we went for the dour too by refreshing the stiff starter and then refrigerating it for 3 days before building levain and then refrigerating it for 24 hours.

  

The levain was a 3 stage build of: 3 hours, 3 hours till it doubled, and then 1 hour where it rose 25% before refrigerating.  The levain was allowed to come to room temperature and finish doubling, about 3 hours before it was used.  The levain came in at 20% of the total weight.

 

While the levain was finishing its final doubling on the counter, we began the autolyse the flour with the fig water, extra water, Toadies and malts – with the salt placed on top.  The fig water was left over from re-hydrating the figs for a bake a couple of weeks ago.  This week we have prune water for a future bake left over from re-hydrating the prunes from this bake.

 

Looks a little over proofed to me.

Once everything came together with a spoon at a little over 74% hydration, we did 5 minutes of slap and folds to get the gluten development started before resting the dough for 15 minutes and doing 1 more minute of slap and folds.  Normally we would do at lea1t 20 minutes of slap and folds over two sessions of 6 and 4 minutes

 

We decided to go with less slap and folds and 3 S&F’s to see if it opened the crumb.  We don’t think it will with all the add-ins for this bread but you never know when your apprentice gets her paws into stuff when you aren’t looking,.  The pistachios, pumpkin seeds and prunes were added at the beginning of the first and 2nd set of S&F’s. 

 

By the end f the 3rd set the add-ins were thoroughly incorporated.  We allowed the bread to bulk ferment for 1 hour before dividing the dough into the pieces required for the Chacon design: a central knotted roll, 4 balls and 4 snails surrounding the roll.

 

This bread makes fin toast with half of; a mango, nectarine and peach, some bacon, black grapes and raspberries - yummy!

After these pieces were placed in the bottom of a lightly rice floured basket I forgot to put the pumpkin seeds in first which would cause a mistake trying to glue them on later.  The remaining bulk of the dough was air shaped into a huge bialy to cover the design.  The basket was immediately placed into a used trash can liner and placed in the fridge for an 18 hour cold retard.

 

The dough rose well in the cold and after a peek, Lucy decided to let the dough warm up for an hour before baking it off in the mini oven at 500F with (2) of Sylvia’s steaming cups and 1/4 C of water tossed into the bottom of the oven for instant steam.

We glued the forgotten seeds on with egg wash, per my apprentice’s recommendation but we should have used water as the egg wash browned much darker than the rest of the crust.  Oh well, I really could care less and I know Lucy doesn’t care a lick either!

 

The lunch sandwich today was an aged white cheddar, pastrami, spicy brown mustard with caramelized; onions, mushrooms and hot peppers all melted together in the micro wave to make a fine pastrami melt.  Yummy!

After 4 minutes we turned the heat down to 475 F and at the 8 minute mark we turned it down to 450 F.  At the 15 minute mark we removed the steam and turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time.  12 minutes later the bread hit 205 F and was deemed done and removed to the cooling rack.

The bread sprang weakly but well enough for the Chacon design to show itself and it browned up with the little blisters the mini oven is famous for putting on crusts.  But that egg wash was a mistake.  The crust didn't lose all of it's crispiness as is cooled. The crumb was open, soft, glossy and moist. It was slightly sweet and sour due to the SD, fig water and prunes.  The pistachios and pumpkin seeds were a nice chew foil to the soft crumb.  We like this bread and will have no problem devouring it. 

The rest of lunch.

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

10

0

0

10

2.38%

Whole Rye

7

10

13

30

7.14%

Whole Wheat

7

10

13

30

7.14%

Whole Spelt

7

10

13

30

7.14%

Water

21

30

39

90

21.43%

Total

52

60

78

190

45.24%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

95

22.62%

 

 

 

Water

95

22.62%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

20.17%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

225

53.57%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

100

23.81%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

325

77.38%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.90%

 

 

 

Fig Water 165, Water

235

55.95%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

72.31%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

420

100.00%

 

 

 

Fig Water 165, Water

330

78.57%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

78.57%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

37.84%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

74.32%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

942

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

4

0.95%

 

 

 

White Malt

4

0.95%

 

 

 

Toadies

8

1.90%

 

 

 

Pistachio Nuts

60

14.29%

 

 

 

Prunes

60

14.29%

 

 

 

Pumpkin Seeds 

40

9.52%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

8

1.90%

 

 

 

Total

184

43.81%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20 g of Pumpkin seeds used on the outside for decoration

 

Comments

gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

What beautiful loaves ... all those goodness and great taste! Wow... I am always intrigued and tempted by the goodies you put in breads... perhaps one day I will say... "boldly I go... baking bread the "dabrownman" way!

Great job!

Diane

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

one of Lucy's odd concoctions.  They are like children.  You don't know if they are going to prison as a mass murderers or will end up being President of the USA one day.  There is so little in between the two with Lucy's recipes:-)  I think you should give one a go just to see how easy they are and  how tasty they can be when they aren't a horrible mess!

Glad you like the bread,  It made a fine lunch sandwich.

Happy Baking Diane.

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

there is no way I have enough interesting stuff in my pantry to follow your creative lead !!  I just watch and admire the many goodies you make. I have organic raisins and an apple on my shopping list to start the YW adventure !  Can't have too much excitement at my age :) c

my apprentice...Meatball...19# 7 oz !!  photo IMG_0012.jpg

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

What a great apprentice and you can tell there is some good cooking going on around your home front!  Meatball won't be running away from home any time soon.  What beautiful kitty!  Meatball needs to meet Ian's 5 kitty apprentices and the dog Max.  I don't have enough stuff in my pantry to make any wild breads but Lucy is another story.  She just keeps bringing out the stuff from her kennel lair and I don't ask any questions.  No telling what she had to kill to get them all :-)

Once you get your YW going a whole new child will be born into the natural yeast world with opportunity galore for more bread stuff and ingredients!  Just what you need....  Glad you liked this bread it sure is tasty....and full of Lucy's stuff.

Happy baking trailrunner and good luck with the YW  

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Bet it tastes great.  I love pistachios in bread but they are just pricey little guys.  Especially when you buy organic.  Eating like a king for a week.  

Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

even peanuts are $2.50 a pound on sale now!  Pistachios are expensive for a reason though and why they are twice as expensive as other nuts - you only get one crop every two years instead of every year.  They do taste great, even in bread.   But to put things in perspective, the 50 g of pistachios in this bread cost 75 cents more than a whole loaf of supermarket 100% whole wheat bread.  The prunes only cost 33 cents but the pumpkin seeds were 33 cents too.  The add ins alone cost $2.42 for this bread making it a very expensive one for sure! Wow!

If you only feel like a prince eating it, then we could add one of Ian's Double Chocolate Stouts at $6.99 a bottle for the liquid and quickly get to a $10 bread just for the ingredients and anyone would feel like a king eating it - and would have to be rich as a king to afford it too :-)  The prunes would go very well with the stout though.

It sure tastes at least .....princely.  A very nice loaf of bread you just can't buy everywhere because it would cost too much for any bakery to sell ....even at Tartine where $10 bread is the norm for white bread!   Another reason to learn to make half decent bread at home.

Ny slashing has improved greatly since I started slashing cold dough per your tip.

Happy baking Josh

golgi70's picture
golgi70

prune stout levain

you could simply replace fig water with a good stout (only a few bucks) cut pistachios and figs. Maybe increase prunes. Keep pumpkin seeds. Incorporate steel cut oats. 

Bam 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Andy does a very nice prune and Brazil nut bread.  We add extra whole grains to the mix but Brazil nuts are almost as expensive as pistachios.  A Guinness, oat, a multigrain, prune and pumpkin bread  sounds decent and not too expensive.  We like the potato and oat combination too.  I can see another bake coming up :-)

annie the chef's picture
annie the chef

on your plate in the other post.  In the past, before the arrival of my kids, I occasionally made sausages, salami, procuitto, pancetta and brewed beers at home.  Do you mind to share your pastrami recipe? Pastrami over here is very lean.  I haven't seen any brisket pastrami before.

I'm planning to start yeast water for bread when the weather is a bit warmer. I better start to do some reading on how to make it soon.

Your loaves and food look delicious as always.

Cheers,

Annie

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

pastrami.  It used to be made with brisket when beef was cheap but now almost all of it is made with the less expensive top round.  It is not the same though - like you say not enough fat.  If you want a pastrami recipe that is very good but uses a wet cure Eric Hanner published a recipe on TFL that works great for the flat (thicker part) of the pastrami and you can search for it     Mine is a dry cure for the thinner point portion of the brisket.  I will send it to you by the message function.

You will love YW as much as i d.  It is very easy..... unlike other children :-)

Glad you like the bread  and happy baking.

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

again.  This is a common occurrence!  Eric Hanner posted on TFL a wet cure pastrami for the thicker flat portion of the brisket that you can find by using the search function. Mine is a dry cure for the thinner point portion of the brisket.  I will send it to you by message.  You are right, since beef in general and brisket particularly has become so expensive, they make  pastrami out of top round now - cheaper but too lean as you say.

You will like yeast water as it is a very easy child to raise and maintain unlike other children :-)

Glad you like the bread.  It is a treat to eat- very tasty.

Happy baking

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

messages for the pastrami recipe

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Another successful bake Da, Well Done!

Cheers,

Wingnut

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

it Wing.  You bread has been very nice of late too!

Happy baking

hanseata's picture
hanseata

the pictures of your beautiful loaf to my worthless apprentices, and they just yawned.

Only as kittens they evinced any interest in the art of bread making, paw stamping rising loaves and, even sampling freshly baked sourdough bread left on the counter.

Now they only knead my legs when they condescend to sit on my lap (with added claw benefits.) Perhaps I should trade those good-for-nothing-cats for your eager and intelligent apprentice.

Karin

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and persistent, is not the sharpest dog in the badger holet  But she is crazy about cooking and baking and is never far from her master's side - especially when in the kitchen.... where stone fingers cause things to jump out of my hands and onto the floor for some reason. 

My daughter says there is a medical reason why this happens called 'old age' but I say that can't be so because children are bred to be way more stupid than older people and don't know squat about anything worth knowing. 

We will have to see who is right about this but, being bred to actually want to drag badgers out of holes with her stout,short fold up legs and long snout so that badger claws can't get to her eyes, Lucy was mostly bred to be dumb as a stump - and she is which explains her odd recipes and other concoctions.  She is thankful to be a baking apprentice now a days for sure though.  I'm determined to help Lucy become the best bread baker she can be, no matter how long it takes, so she doesn't have to face cat claws ...much less badger slashes ever again!

This is a fine bread that is only missing some hemp seeds to pump it up to the next level.

Love your Pumpkin Bread too!  Happy baking Karin!  

isand66's picture
isand66

Lucy did a fine job on this bake for sure.  It not only must taste great but looks as pretty as she does!   Max is eager to get back to baking now that I've returned.  Made some quick rolls but need to work on something a little more exciting.  That lunch looks tasty as always.

Regards

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

we did earlier this week were the best yet.  Straight YW with cream cheese.  Most open, soft and moist rolls ever and the spring was triple the height when they went in the mini oven =  explosive!   You missed the Tzitzel bake too while you were busy noodling and won toning in China  - getting very close with that one too.

This bread is s treat for sure.  We loved it for breakfast this morning.

Now get back to baking and posting the results Ian :-) 

isand66's picture
isand66

I did see the post but my Internet in China is like dial-up sometimes soi wasn't able to comment.

Will revisit soon. 

I will post my boring rolls shortly.  Have to refresh my starter and YW starter before I can make something a bit more exciting.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Can't wait to see your next post.   Exciting for you could be dangerous:-) 

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Gotta love that fruit and nut action going on in the big loaf!

There's a slight variation on Hamelman's Sourdough Seed Loaf proofing on my counter right now and I can already tell that it will taste terrific.  Amazing what a few non-flour add ins will do to a loaf's flavor, isn't it?

Paul

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

used to say ' you have to let the sails out a little bit every once in while...just to make sure there aren't any holes in them.'  He was talking about shore leave at the time but I guess it fits bread too.  Now and again, a few nuts, seeds and fruits can go a long way to putting a bread smile on your face - just maybe not as big as the ones the Chief would  come back from liberty with :-) 

All of Hamelman's bread seem to be crafted to put a smile on your face.  Canlt wait to see it.

Happy baking Paul

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Oh my! this is the ultimate flavored sourdough i could ever see, and you made a pastrami melt with it?! Soo much flavor here, DA. I'm worried about you. Your taste buds are now accustomed to 60 different flavors if not more :)

Exceptional bread, DA!

-Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

flat bread I used to get in Iran and Turkey.  They would make a honey laced thickish pita with crushed pistachios, chopped dates or figs and put pumpkin seeds, from that beautiful large yellow Turkish squash, in it with a little cardamon and a pinch of cinnamon .  I loved that summer squash so much I dried out some seeds and brought, actually smuggled, them back to the states and grew them in my Kansas City garden for years.  No one had ever seen a squash like that before or since - best squash ever.

The overkill for the pastrami sandwich was the caramelized onion, hot peppers and mushrooms!  Delicious and not one sandwich component complained about another one to me or my apprentice:-)

You would like this bread Khalid - very tasty.

Can't wait to see your next bake.

Skibum's picture
Skibum

I love the idea of pistachios in bread!  Loved the toadies too.  And my 'to bake' list just got another item longer.  So many great ideas and so little time . . .

Beautiful food, as usual Dman!

Regards, Brian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We put pistachios in a lot breads,  The most underused nut in bread along with;, hazelnuts, Brazil nuts, cashews and peanuts:-)  Why I don't know ....other than cost  because they are great in breads especially altamura, durum and semolina ones. 

Plenty of time to bake lots of different bread combinations.   Done about 200 of them in the last year and three quarters with only 10,000 more to go.

Happy baking Ski !