The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

100% Levain Pizza

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Divani's picture
Divani

100% Levain Pizza

 

Pizza made with 100% levain.

 

 

 

CeciC's picture
CeciC

CAn you please share the recipe for the crust? It looks marvelous!!

Divani's picture
Divani

For each pizza I have used:

180 gr all purpose flour
110 gr water
40 gr levain (100% water - 100% flour)
4 gr salt

In the KitchenAid mixed flour and water at speed 1 just until combined and autolysed for 30 minutes.  Added salt and levain and mixed at speed 2 for 10 minutes.

Let it bulk ferment for 30 minutes, made one stretch and fold (in four directions) and let it ferment for another 30 minutes.

Then, if dough is for more than one pizza, divide into 340 gr and form into balls and put in the refrigerator at least 24 hours and up to 4 days.

From one hour to one hour and a half before baking (depending on how much the dough has raised) remove from refrigerator and it is ready to bake.

Hope it was clear, if not please let me know.

Regards

CeciC's picture
CeciC

Thank you very much !!

sarafly's picture
sarafly

Looks great!

 

Divani's picture
Divani

Very kind.

DavidEF's picture
DavidEF

What do you mean by 100% Levain? I make dough and let it ferment for days in the fridge. It can be used as "old dough" to ferment my bread when I bake, but often, I take it out and use it for pizza without adding anything else to it. Are you doing something like that or are you "building a levain" like you would for a multi-stage bread, and leaving out the last stage of the bread? Or do you mean that you are baking your starter?

Divani's picture
Divani

Sorry, David, I now realize I was not very clear.  What I meant is that I did not add yeast and have only used the levain as leavener. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and it has to taste great!  So many fine pizzas on TFL of late.  Well done.

Worms's picture
Worms

Looks really good!

It looks as if you have a really good, hot stove or perhaps a proper pizza oven to get it looking that good!

For me, pizza is a by-product of normal bread-making, like David EF above, it comes from the lump of dough maturing in the fridge.  

Divani's picture
Divani

It is a regular gas oven with an upper grill, I turn it on one hour before baking time and bake with the upper grill on and a pizza stone.  Pizzas are ready in about two and a half minutes.

Divani's picture
Divani

Using the same dough and technique.

 

DavidEF's picture
DavidEF

I like the pizzas I make at home, using my sourdough. In fact, unless something goes wrong, like I forget to take the dough out of the fridge early enough to rise good, I usually love my pizza. But pictures like these make me wish I had a hotter oven. I never get char like that on mine! Great looking pizza there (again)! And you're getting a two-and-a-half-minute pizza out of a regular gas stove? Awesome!

DavidEF's picture
DavidEF

In reference to my post above, I do have a self-cleaning oven, and some people have had success with cutting off the latch that locks the door closed, so they can bake at 800+ degrees Fahrenheit. I guess I could try that, if I ever get really motivated to raise the bar on my pizza. But, not going to do it any time soon. My wife would totally freak out!

Divani's picture
Divani

David, the stove is a 12 year old DCS gas stove with an upper broiler.  I turn on the oven, including the broiler, one hour prior to baking with a baking stone inside and when I put the pizza I also turn on the convection, but I have to keep turning the pizza otherwise it does not bake regularly.  But I have made no modifications to the stove whatsoever. In my opinion you do need a very hot oven in order to get a well raised and airy crust.

bnom's picture
bnom

I used this sort of set up in my gas stove (with a salamander-type broiler) based on the recommendation of Jim Sullivan's My Pizza. He recommended placing stone 8 inches from broiler (he preheats oven for at least 30 minutes and broiler for 10). The dough didn't have the puffiness I usually get when I just bake it on the stone set on the lowest rack. 

I have some more pizza dough rising now so I wonder if you could tell me where you have positioned your stone?

I've never seen a stove where you can both heat the oven from the bottom and have the broiler going at the same time. 

 

 

 

Divani's picture
Divani

To tell you the truth I have always assumed that both the oven and the broiler were on and have never tried to check if the oven turns off when the broiler is on.  The distance from the broiler to the stone is about 8 inches, but I would heat the stone and broiler a little longer, otherwise the corniccione does not puff so much and you risk not cooking the bottom enough, since with the broiler on the whole baking process is much shorter.

Let us know how it comes out.

 

Maeve's picture
Maeve

Thank you for the recipe!  I am trying to convert my regular recipes to sourdough versions and getting confused, so when I saw that your recipe was very close to my recipe (except for the starter) I decided to try it.  My starter is very happy to bubble and double when it's been fed, but refuses to rise a loaf and it didn't rise this pizza dough either, so I had to cheat with instant yeast.  But I'm OK with that!  Until I either train myself or my starter.  :)  I used 300 grams King Arthur bread flour, 69 grams of durum wheat (ground in my Nutrimill) 200 grams of water, 20 grams of leftover mashed potato (which we flavour with butter and salt and pureed onion) and 7 grams of kosher salt.  (since it didn't budge in a two hour fermentation/first rise I added a tsp of instant yeast and it rose happily after that)  No stretch and fold, just separate into two equal pieces and put in oiled containers and put in the fridge.  The dough was lovely and stretchy and I got a very thin crust with nice edges.  The bottom was nicely smooth and crispy and it just drooped a bit when slicing it while hot.  It had stretched so thin that I was a bit worried about it being floppy.  The flavour of the dough was a bit more intense wheat-y-ness, which was lovely.

 

So thanks again!

Divani's picture
Divani

Indeed I would not expect to have noticeable rise in the two hours bulk fermentation with only the levain. The same happens to my dough.  That is why I recommend leaving it in the fridge for at least 24 hours after shaping or, alternatively, you could make the balls after 2 hours bulk fermentation and leave them to ferment at room temperature.  Of course this depends a lot on many factors, but in this case I usually have them ready after 6 hours final rise.  Perhaps I would also consider adding a little bit more water and see what happens.  But if you are happy with the end result, that is what really matters.

Best wishes,