The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

How to count carbos in bread? Newbie baker wants to know.

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Jimmy13's picture
Jimmy13

How to count carbos in bread? Newbie baker wants to know.

Say I make a loaf of bread. If I read all the ingredients' packages and figure the carb count per cup of flour (and other ingredients) do I then have the carb count for the whole loaf of bread? Or does baking cause the chemistry to change and thereby add/subtract to the number of carbs in the loaf?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Also figure your fiber grams.  Subtract the fiber grams from the carbohydrate grams to get the count. (Digesting fiber requires energy.)   That is the simplest and only way to reduce the carb grams that I know of.  :)

Jimmy13's picture
Jimmy13

Thanks, Mini Oven, for your response but it's not quite what I asked for. I want to know how to figure total carb grams per loaf of bread. I don't want to reduce the carb grams.

I'm diabetic, you see, and I need to know these things. That way I can use my bread slicer to control carb count per slice, so I know exactly how many carbs I ingest when I chomp one of my Dagwood sandwiches.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Q: If I read all the ingredients' packages and figure the carb count per cup of flour (and other ingredients) do I then have the carb count for the whole loaf of bread?

A:  Yes

Jimmy13's picture
Jimmy13

I guess I wasn't clear enough. My bad. So try it this way: I already knew how to get the total carb count of the DOUGH. What I didn't know is whether or not chemical changes caused by BAKING the dough added to or subtracted from the carb count of the finished LOAF.

Now that I think about it -- I guess that IS a silly question. But in my life I've found that the answers to silly questions sometimes help me to avoid silly mistakes.

Thanks, Mini Oven, for your kindness and your patience. Some places I've been on the Web, people get toasted for asking silly questions.

 

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

to charcoal, then the carb. count would be reduced.  Fermenting and baking does rearrange molecules a little bit but the carbohydrate stays, the difference may be that the energy released can increase in the blood slowly or quickly depending on the size of the carbohydrate molecule that is made during the process. 

Water is added to flour and ingredients and then steam comes off in the baking, not much else.  With milk products, the milk solids remain in the bread as the water part leaves.  Browning only exposes the amounts of available sugar to brown not increasing or decreasing them.  Yeasts and bacteria can use starches and sugars, change them a bit and reduce browning but the carbohydrates are still there in the dough/loaf.  The wee-beasties don't jump off the dough with their by-products before the loaf is baked.  We eat them with all their hard work.

If one happens to incorporate a good amount of fiber, it will effect how one digests the bread.  A body will need energy to break it down or send it on it's way out, therefore you can subtract gram for gram, fiber from the carbohydrate count.  There won't be much effect with flours that have 1% fiber (1g per 100g flour)  But when adding seeds and rye flour, chia, and flax and other fiber filled ingredients, it can be worth the effort to figure it.   

Be careful with tables, some will automatically subtract fiber grams.  Do compare tables and calculators and web sites.  Do keep track of whose index is used, they may be slighted toward buying particular products.  Foods also vary from season to season and animal products will vary from type of food eaten. It takes a little more effort when starting to do the math, but it gets easier with time and you will be able to sense with something doesn't "add up" while shopping and comparing products.  :)

 

 

WishfulSpirit777's picture
WishfulSpirit777

When I was doing the weight watchers thing I found the about.com recipe calculator very useful. What you do is bake your bread (keeping track of the recipe you use of course) and slice it. Count your slices.

Enter your recipe into the calculator and enter however many slices you have as the number of "servings." It will return the complete nutrition info per slice. Baking does not alter the carbohydrates in the bread.

Here's the link: http://caloriecount.about.com/cc/recipe_analysis.php

Sometimes you  have to fiddle around with how you write ingredients before it will understand you. Message me if you have trouble.

 

Jimmy13's picture
Jimmy13

Thanks, WishfulSpirit! That's a mighty handy gizmo. I will use it often, I'm sure.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

for carbs. Being on Atkins and dying for a piece of bread now and then, will make this a bit easier to sin :)

Thanks so much.