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calculating for makng bread in larger quantities

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jofl's picture
jofl

calculating for makng bread in larger quantities

Can anyone help,

shortly I will be trying to make bread in larger quantities from 2 loafs to approx. 20 loafs. Can anyone tell me how I calculate my measurements and percentages?

Normally I use an 18 month old rye starter , and  create a leven as the main rising agent for my bread.

 

Thanks

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi jofl,

Probably the easiest way into recipe formulation is to look at the  Bread Bakers' Guild of America website here: http://www.bbga.org/bread/bakers_percentage and in particular this article: http://www.bbga.org/files//BakersPercent-Healea.pdf

This system is adopted by many US bakers, so it is creating a recognisable standard and I recommend you give this document plenty of attention first of all.   I note you are UK based, as am I.   The only difficulty I have with the US system is it doesn't really show at a glance what the % pre-fermented flour is, and the relationship between pre-ferment portion and final dough is slightly problematic.   If you want to see the changes I have made, just look at the formulae for the recipes in my blog; this is a good example: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/29875/baking-powburn-show-2012-my-account-codrutas-visit

But in simple parlance, you assume that the flour in the formula totals 100, and express the other ingredients as a proportion of that 100.   Everything in Bakers % is done by weight; no measuring is involved, hoorah!

You need to total up the ingredients when listed as above to give a % total.   Then divide the total amount of dough required by this % total to give you a factor by which to multiply up your % formula to give you the required recipe.   See example below:

Flour 100, Water 63, Salt 2, Yeast 2, TOTAL 167.   Required amount of dough 2000g

Factor = 2000/167 = 12 [you always need to slightly round-up otherwise you will be short of dough!

Now you multiply your % figure for each ingredient by this factor to give your recipe as follows:

Flour 1200, Water 756, Salt 24, Yeast 24, TOTAL = 2004

Best wishes

Andy

jofl's picture
jofl

Duh!!! didn't think of the simple ratio method -thanks Andy, ill have a look at your blog. Where in the UK are you ?

ananda's picture
ananda

I'm in Northumberland; near Alnwick

Andy

jofl's picture
jofl

dough 2000g - what weight are you making each of your loafs?

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi again,

the illustration I gave is only an example of how to do Bakers %.   It has no bearing on anything "real".

A

DavidEF's picture
DavidEF

I second what Andy said. If you use weight to measure your ingredients, then scaling up or down suddenly becomes less problematic (as long as you're good at math), and for even better scaling, Bakers' Percents can't be beat. Even changing from different measurement systems (say US vs Metric) becomes no problem at all. There is only one unit of measure in Bakers' Percents, and that is the flour. Everything is weighed, and the weight of each ingredient is compared to the weight of the flour. So, if you have 70% water, that will be the same whether you are measuring 700g of water to 1000g of flour, or 3.5g to 5g or 35oz to 50oz or 385lbs to 550lbs!

hanseata's picture
hanseata

on a scale that buying a new software makes sense, check out http://www.breadstorm.com/  I was a beta tester and the program functions really well.

Karin

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

I second Karin's recommendation above.

You might like to check our FARINE.  She just posted a great piece on Bread Storm.  Reviews seem very positive from the testers.  ( I was not a tester.  I just trust both Karin and MC's judgment knowing the quality of breads they bake and their overall general knowledge of baking.  I am old-fashioned myself and prefer to crunch the numbers with my trusty kitchen calculator:)

Good Luck,

Janet