The Fresh Loaf

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Multigrain Sourdough with Sesame and Flax Seeds Toadies and Malts

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Multigrain Sourdough with Sesame and Flax Seeds Toadies and Malts

We needed to come up with a white bread that had around 30% of home milled, whole grains that did't disappoint when it came to flavor and sour.   We have been developing 80% and higher whole grains with robust flavor and sour but, some folks just don’t like breads like that .....even though that should be against the bread laws :-)

My poor apprentice still thinks that, if it isn’t pumpernickel, it’s not even close to real bread and she should know being the determined German she looks like and claims to be.  But, the other girls in the family still like their mamby,  pamby, cotton candy, Oroweat, supposed whole wheat bread even though, it sure doesn’t look like any whole wheat I grind and bake – not even close.

 

Hopefully, Lucy will come up with a recipe that they actually prefer over their notion of what bread is supposed to be.   So, we took a flyer from toad.de.b and decided to do a bread that required double slap and folds.  Our 2nd set required double slaps to one fold as it was stiffer than normal!

 

After Tom’s great flavor enhancing invention that Lucy named 'Toadies' (short for Toady Tom's Toasted Tasty Tidbits), you just have to read his latest post on his summer bread experiments and incorporate what ever strikes your fancy into your methods -  like I made my apprentice over her scowls and growls.

 

This time we dropped the whole wheat from the whole grain mix and added whole oats to the usual rye, Kamut and spelt.  For liquid, we went with water this time instead of some part being yogurt whey.  This white bread should be less tangy than our normal loaf as a result but it should still be tangy enough.

 

Weonce again put the whole grain bits into the levain to get them wet as long as possible.   We hoped they would be softer that wasy and not cut the gluten strands too much when we went to develop it.  We also did a 48 hour retard after the 3rd stage build had risen 25%  to promote sour and lab reproduction over yeast reproduction.

 

When the levain came out of the fridge to finish it's 48 hour belated doubling, we started the autolyse with everything else except the ground seeds.  We only sprinkled the salt on top of the autolyse so we wouldn’t for get it later as we sometimes prone to do.

 

After 3 hours on the counter, the levain was ready by finishing its doubling.  We mixed it with the autolyse and then did 10 minutes of slap and folds.  After a 15 minute rest we did another 4 minutes of slap and folds before resting it again for 15 minutes.  The gluten was fully developed but we still did 2 sets of slap and folds on 15 minute intervals.  The ground sesame and flax seeds were incorporated on the first one and were evenly distributed by the 2nd set.

 

After another 15 minute rest we pre-shaped the dough into a boule and 10 minutes later shaped it for keeps and dropped it seam side up into a lightly rice floured basket.  A short 30 minute counter proof and into the fridge it went  We planned on a  retard per Toady Tom’s latest near death wait of 20 hours.  We hoped the low levain inoculation of 12% would be small enough so the dough didn't explode.  Low inoculations and long low temperature retards promote flavor and sour better than any other way.

 

We let the boule warm up for half an hour before starting the mini oven's  preheat to 500 F.  For steam, we used the overturned stainless steel bowl over the broiler pan that had ½ C of water in the bottom.

The boule was un-molded, quickly slashed in a square, covered with the stainless mixing bowl and placed into the mini oven for 14 minutes of steam.  At the 7 minute mark we turned the oven down to 475 F and at the 10 minute mark we turned it down to 450 F.  5 more minutes of steam would have been better but my apprentice forgets to add steaming time when covering with a cloche.

 

The steaming bottom of the broiler pan came out at 14 minutes and the temperature was turned down to 425 F, convection this time.  The bread didn’t spring much, spread a little and bloomed some under the steam.  A sure sign the bread was proofed over 85% and or not steamed long nough.  These long ferments can be tricky to time properly when you are sound asleep :-) 

 

We rotated the bread every 5 minutes to make sure it browned properly.  Oddly, as soon as the steam came out, the bread sprang nicely and puffed itself up pretty well.  After 15 minutes of dry heat, the bread registered 205 on the Fahrenheit scale.   It was then moved to the cooling rack all browned up and blistered with the mini oven’s typical crust.

Yesterday's white bread lunch  and this moring's white bread breakfast.

Will have to wait on the crumb shots but will have this bread for a late lunch as see how we like it.  But first a nice sunset.

Followed by today's lunch.

The crumb was open moist and soft.  The crust went softer as it cooled and became more chewy rather than crunchy.  If I have to eat white bread..... this is the one I want.  The seeds really come through and help make this bread flavorful and plenty tasty enough.  I was struck by the sour flavor and some of it must be because of the lowered levain amount to less than 12% and retarding of it for 48 hours.  Toady Tom's 20 hour retard of the dough didn't hurt either.  I could eat this bread all day without ever knowing it is a white bread.  We likie this bread a lot and now have to see what the girlsi think. 

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

12

0

0

12

2.82%

25% Extracted Bran

6

7

9

22

5.16%

Water

12

14

18

44

10.33%

Total

30

21

27

78

23.47%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

50

11.74%

 

 

 

Water

50

11.74%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

11.83%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

75% Extraction Multigrain

56

13.15%

 

 

 

AP

200

46.95%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

110

25.82%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

376

88.26%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.88%

 

 

 

Water

306

71.83%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

81.38%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

426

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

356

83.57%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

83.57%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

28.70%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

78.07%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

845

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

5

1.17%

 

 

 

White Malt

5

1.17%

 

 

 

Toadies

10

2.35%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

25

5.87%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

2.35%

 

 

 

Total

55

12.91%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

75% extraction multi-grain is: 25% Kamut,

 

 

 

 25% Oat, 25% spelt & 25% rye

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

Yet another great looking bake DA.  I would love some of that holy bread with some EVO grilled and maybe some roasted peppers and fresh mozzarella.

Beautiful crust and crumb.  I wish I had time to bake one to bring with me to China on Tuesday.

Happy Baking

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

whit bread.  I almost didn't put in the seeds but glad I did. I've got to make some bruschetta for it at lunch today and some toast this morning.  Hopefully the spur is really coming through on day 2.  Safe travels in China and don't forget the noodles - as close to bread as you will get,

Happy baking Ian and Lucy says hi to your 6 apprentices.  I think she has a thing for Max.

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

That's one beautiful loaf, dab.  Mucho admiration for that open crumb with so many ingredients working against it.  Similar quests indeed.  Your starter must love that extracted bran -- puts it in overdrive.

What I wonder when I see your (and some others') presentation here of multiple slices of the product -- I assume you then consumed all those slices more or less immediately.  I sure hope you're not sacrificing the keeping quality of such a superb bake -- exposing so much of it to drying AZ air -- just for pornophotographic presentation purposes.  I've seen some Loafers display entire loaves all sliced up.  What a crime (where perp=victim!) if just for TFL display.

Cheers,

Tom

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

usual.  Maybe the extra slap and folds helped open the crumb.  I do like feeding the sifted out portion to the starter.  It doesn't seem to mind and the hard bits get softer which helps open the crumb too,.

I cut the each loaf into quarters and then slice one quarter while wrapping and freezing the other 3 quarters.  I eat the heal of the slices to see what the crumb tastes like and I toast half of the slice the slice next to it since all bread tastes better toasted  or some reason.  I peal off the crust of the other half for Lucy since that is her favorite part and eat the crumb to see what it tastes like, So that is 2 slices gone.  I them make a sandwich with2 slices for lunch.  I get about 7-8 slices per quarter so I have 4 left this morning. Two will go for toast for breakfast and 2 for the lunch sammy and in 24 hours the sliced quarter is gone, even before it knew it was sliced and i get to see if the sour improves on day 2.  The rest lasts the week plus i use some other bread out of the freezer that is  chock full of stuff.

The added benefit is that I have lots of slices to take pretty pictures of to post on TFL.  They say people who take pictures of their food are crazy and I think they may be on to something :-)

This is a nice looking a bread inside and out and it tastes great.  I'm working my way up to a 50% whole grain multi-grain that also has Ian's potatoes,  Janet's corn and my oats in it.    This one had the oats so come corn and potatoes should round it out,  Tang Zhong 5% of it and we should be pretty close to a sandwich bread Lucy will eat even if it isn't DaPumperized:-)

Glad you like the bread Josh, keep those experiments coming and

Happy baking

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

That's a bread that will be great for sandwiches, or toast, or crostini, or all by itself.  Lovely bake, dab. 

Paul

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

a white bread, but when we do, we prefer then to come out like this.  Very tasty and good looking inside and out,  The seeds add much to the flavor profile.  I do want to make this bread without them and see what difference it makes.

Your waffles sure looked tasty and since it is breakfast time, maybe some EM's with sausage and stone fruits

Happy baking  Paul

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Blisters galore!

Very nice bake, Dab. I prefer hearty rye breads, smeared with salted and/or European-style butter, but this white bread looks fantastic---inside and out. But I wouldn't know it was white bread from looks alone. :)

Happy baking,

Zita

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

white bread but I say that, if a bread has less than 30% whole grains, it is a white bread !  My 100% whole wheat bread doesn't look like the 100% WW in the grocery store nor does it taste like it since it is sourdough.  I too orefer a more hearty bread and 40% rye with scald and caraway is one of my favorites but I have to say I also like a 100% whole grain multigrain bread with sprouts or scald too.  Not quite as heavy but just as nutritious.  Pumpernickel is still the king of bread around here, if you overlookll the Oroweat, because of Lucy's fondness for it.

The day of the dead is quickly approaching and i look forward to this year's sculpture from your oven.

Happy baking

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Beauty crust and amazing crumb.  Inspiring whole grain bake as always.

One of these days I will have to attempt a dabrown style lunch.  Yum.  And the best part is you feel amazingly healthy after eating it!

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

great white bread,  Can't wait to have some for a holiday lunch.  Eating not too much meat, whole grains, lots of veggies and fresh fruits are just what the kids in school hate :-)  But it would be good for them if they could get on the eat right and live forever bandwagon. 

It takes a little longer but, you don't over eat even though you feel full and it is healthy - and so few things we do are healthy.  Give it a go and you won't go back to eating a poor breakfast and lunch.  Here is today's holiday breakfast that was fancy do with the grilled salmon cream cheese, cantaloupe, peach, blueberries,half a mango and a whole grain bagel.   What a great way to start even the most difficult day.

Happy Baking John

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Did I say yum before?....oh, yum!

John