The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sourdough Honey Whole Wheat Multigrain Bread with PEF

  • Pin It
dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Sourdough Honey Whole Wheat Multigrain Bread with PEF

 

Sourdough Honey Whole Wheat Multi-grain Bread with PEF

August 26, 2013

 

About three months ago, I baked a multi-grain sourdough bread based on my San Francisco-style Sourdough that we really liked. (See Sourdough Honey Whole Wheat Multigrain Bread) That bake used the last of the multi-grain mix I had ordered from King Arthur Flour. I waited for one of KAF's “free shipping” deals and, last week, got a new supply of “Harvest Grains.”

In the meantime, I was intrigued by Franko's bake of a beautiful bread that used a sprouted spelt flour product from British Columbia. (See Local Flours) I was surprised and delighted to find that my local Whole Foods Market carried both sprouted whole wheat and sprouted whole spelt flours from the same source.

 

Today I baked a couple boules of SD Honey Whole Wheat Multi-grain breads using sprouted whole wheat flour from One Degree Organic Foods. Oh, what does “PEF” mean? It is an abbreviation for “performance enhancing flour.” I'm sure if bread baking followed the same rules as sports, it would be banned.

I used exactly the same formula as I had on my last bake of this bread, except that I substituted the One Degree sprouted whole wheat flour for the Giusto's Fine Whole Wheat Flour I used previously. I found that the sprouted wheat flour absorbed less water than the non-sprouted WW flour, and it fermented much, much faster. These differences were entirely predictable from the caveats provided by Andy (ananda on TFL) in Franko's topic, cited above. Flour made from sprouted grain has less protein (because protease enzymes  are activated) and generates free simple sugars from starch faster (because amylase enzymes are also activated).

 It was clear, once the final dough started mixing, that what had been a “rather slack” dough was now downright gloppy. I gave it some thought but decided not to add more flour. I did mix the dough for 10 minutes rather than 6 minutes to get partial gluten development. I had planned on fermenting for 2 1/2 or 3 hours, but, by 1 hour in my 75 dF kitchen, the dough was gassy and expanded by over 50%. I did one more S&F in the bowl, gave the dough another 30 minutes and then divided it, shaped two boules and retarded them overnight to bake the next morning. I baked the loaves 5 minutes longer than previously to make sure the wet dough was well-cooked inside and because the crust color was not as dark as I expected after 30 minutes baking.

 

Total dough

Bakers' %

Wt (g)

AP flour

34

192

Bread flour

14

79

Medium Rye flour

2

14

Sprouted WW Flour

50

281

Water

93

528

KAF “Harvest Grains”

18

100

Honey

3

17

Salt

1.9

11

Total

194.9

1222

 

Stiff levain

Bakers' %

Wt (g)

Bread flour

95

79

Medium rye flour

5

11

Water

50

45

Stiff starter

80

66

Total

230

201

 

  1. Dissolve the starter in the water. Add the flours and mix thoroughly until the flour has been completely incorporated and moistened.

  2. Ferment at room temperature for 6-12 hours, depending on starter vigor, room temperature, etc..

 

Soaker

Bakers' %

Wt (g)

KAF “Harvest Grains”

100

100

Water (Boiling

100

100

Total

200

200

  1. Just before mixing the autolyse, put the “Harvest Grains” blend in a medium-sized bowl and pour the boiling water over it. Cover.

  2. Allow to soak during the autolyse (see below).

 

Final dough

Wt (g)

AP flour

169

Sprouted WW Flour

274

Water

350

Salt

11

Honey

17

Soaker

200

Stiff levain

201

Total

1222

Method

  1. In a stand mixer, mix the flours and water at low speed until they form a shaggy mass.

  2. Cover and autolyse for 30 minutes

  3. Add the salt, honey, soaker and levain and mix at low speed for 2-3 minutes, then increase the speed to medium (Speed 2 in a KitchenAid) and mix for 10 minutes. The dough should be very slack.

  4. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl and cover tightly.

  5. Ferment at 70º F for 1 1/2 to 2 hours (or until expanded 75% and gassy) with a stretch and folds in the bowl every 30 minutes for the first 2 hours.

  6. Divide the dough into two equal pieces.

  7. Pre-shape as rounds and rest, covered, for 10 minutes.

  8. Shape as boules or bâtards and place in bannetons. Place bannetons in plastic bags.

  9. Proof at room temperature (68-70º F) for 30-60 minutes.

  10. Cold retard the loaves overnight.

  11. The next morning, proof the loaves for 1 1/2 hours.

  12. 45-60 minutes before baking, pre-heat the oven to 480º F with a baking stone and steaming apparatus in place.

  13. Transfer the loaves to a peel. Score the loaves as desired, turn down the oven to 460º F, steam the oven, and transfer the loaves to the baking stone.

  14. After 15 minutes, remove the steaming apparatus, and turn down the oven to 435º F/Convection. (If you don't have a convection oven, leave the temperature at 460º F.)

  15. Bake for another 15-20 minutes.

  16. Leave in turned off oven with the door ajar for 15 minutes.

  17. Transfer the loaves to a cooling rack, and cool thoroughly before slicing.

  

The loaves had rather little oven spring. Since I do not think they were over-proofed, I wonder if they were over-fermented. This would also explain the lighter crust color than when un-sprouted whole wheat flour was used. With a slightly longer bake, they did develop the nice reddish-dark brown crust color I favor in sourdough hearth loaves. 

Addendum 8/27/2013: The morning after they were baked, I sliced and tasted one of the loaves.

The bread was tasted un-toasted and toasted, with almond butter and almond butter plus apricot preserves, by two independent jurors. 

DMS: On slicing, the crumb was denser than expected, although still reasonably open for a 50% WW with all those seeds, flakes and cracked grains. The crust was pretty thick and crunchy. The crumb was moist. Un-toasted, my first impression of the aroma and of the flavor was "sour rye." I would never have identified this as a whole wheat bread on a blind tasting. When toasted, the bread had an unique flavor - no longer really reminiscent of sour rye, but not of whole wheat either. There was a moderate sourdough tang. There was less sweet flavor than with non-sprouted WW. With almond butter and preserves, it was pretty good but didn't knock my socks off.

SGS: First impression on slicing: "Whoah! Substantial." On first tasting un-toasted, she commented on some un-identifiable flavor which she didn't really like. She thought it might be the sunflower seeds in the Harvest Grains mix. When toasted with almond butter, she remarked on the sourness, which was more than she liked. When she added apricot preserves, she pronounced it improved. "Okay, but I'd prefer it less dense. ... Don't stop making it!"

Conclusion: This bread has a really unique flavor that is quite different from breads made with un-sprouted whole wheat flour. Whether this flavor is really from the sprouted grain or is partly from the Harvest Grains, I'm not sure. There are other whole wheat breads we prefer to this one, but it may be worth tweaking.

I am thinking that, if I bake this bread again using sprouted WW flour, I will use a smaller levain inoculation to prolong the bulk fermentation and substitute a stronger bread flour for the AP flour. But before that I should  make a yeasted 100% whole wheat bread with the sprouted WW flour to see how that tastes. And before that, I should see what I can find out from other's experience with this product.

David

Comments

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

The color looks so rich and I bet they turn out to be very flavorful. I have purchased the sprouted rolled  oats, and the sprouted rye flour and sprouted spelt flour. I haven't had time to use them yet but am bookmarking all the bakes that all of you are doing . When you say "stiff starter" what percentage would you say ?  Looking forward to the crumb shots and taste review. c

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'm struggling, waiting to slice them ... but I have so far. I think we're going to have to go out for dinner, if only to avoid the temptation for a little longer. ( Only a bread baker would understand that rationalization.) If they make it past bedtime snack this evening, I will be surprised.

My stiff levain is 1:1:2 (starter:water:flour). The flour is actually my usual starter feeding mix of 70:20:10 (AP:WW:Rye).

I'll be interested to read your reports of how these other sprouted grain flours perform for you.

David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I'm looking forward to the crumb shot, with a 50% SWWF.  The outside crust looks beautiful.  I bet this bread will toast up delicious for breakfast.  

I've only baked 100% SWWF bread, pizza and a pineapple type focaccia bread.  It did give me an idea how this flour tastes and behaves..from what I read it was a good decision for you not to add more flour.

I also like the Harvest Grains mixture, it's always so fresh!  I took advantage of the free shipping w/$purchase too, only mine hasn't arrived yet.

I hope to get back into a baking mood when cooler weather gets here.

Sylvia 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

You have more experience with SWWF than I.

I haven't made a multi-grain bread that I didn't like yet. The nice thing about the Harvest Grains mix is that it is mixed and that, as you say, the grains and seeds are not rancid. The not-so-nice cost may not be much more than buying the ingredients in bulk and mixing them yourself. I'm not sure I want to know.

In searching for my previous posts on this bread, I rediscovered that I had used this dough for rolls which were greatly enjoyed. I must remember to do that again. 

David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

both sound wonderful.    

As far as the grains go...I thought the same as you.  Then I thought I could still have the bulk too : ) and pick and choose what goes into it.  

Sylvia 

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

These would already be sliced !!  I can't ever wait and even if I could there is a guy here who is relentless with the bread knife !  I have meant to mix up that feeding formula and will do so tomorrow. I hope to get to the sprouted flours and the sprouted rolled oats asap, ( have enough dough for 16 loaves of SJSD in the fridge for my son...) 

I signed up for KA mailings but so far nothing...need several things when free shipping comes around. 

( waving to sylvia ) c

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

LOL.

We put off slicing the bread for a couple more hours by going out to dinner. We're back for a half hour now. As I was reading your message, my wife comes into the room and asks "Did you leave some of that seeded bread out for breakfast?" DMS: "Only one loaf." SGS: "Have you sliced it yet?"

At least she wasn't wielding a bread knife!

David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

My mail special only lasted until last Thursday.  It was spend $65 and get free delivery.  Sorry you missed this one.  Maybe you should check with KA about your signup. 

Sylvia

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi David,

I think these are very nice looking loaves despite less oven spring than what you expected….

When I did the math your pre-fermented flour comes out to be about 15% of the total flour….if I did it correctly….That is the amount I use with all of my loaves which are made with freshly ground 100% ww which ferments really quickly too so I don't think  your leaven is the issue.  

What I do differently than you do though is that, once my dough is completely kneaded (I use my DLX for this.), it goes directly into the refrig. for it's overnight bulk ferment whereas you let yours ferment for quite awhile at room temp. prior to refrigerating it and you shape it at night too.  Mine sits out at room temp. in the morning to warm up and then it gets shaped and proved so our total fermenting times are probably the same - just configured differently.  (This is my summer routine when temps. here are up.  In the winter I let doughs sit out for approx. an hour but I keep an eye out for expansion and try to catch it when it has risen approx. 25% or less.  (Recommended by txfarmer in her ww loaves blogs.)

Not sure if this info. will help you on your next bake with these flours….You know there are lots of factors at play which is one of the reasons I love baking.  Lots to figure out :)

But anyway, I think these are really nice looking loaves with good height on them.  I am curious to see what you think of the flavor when you cut into them in the morning.

Thanks for the post.

Take Care,

Janet

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I think this bread would work well with retarding in bulk. Maybe I'll try that next time. 

David

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Just read your comments on how it tasted etc…One thing you might try too to get a more open crumb, if that is what you would like to do, is add a egg per loaf.  It should help strengthen the dough too.

The tweaks will keep coming and coming….I sense a new bread 'project' will be happening in your kitchen until you get this loaf where it pleases both you and the 'Mrs.'

Such fun :- )  I look forward to reading about where this leads next.

Take Care,

Janet

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Lovely looking boules, David! Now, i'm really excited to see the crumb, after your gloppy dough predicament.

-Khalid

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

You consistently produce some of the most beautiful rustic loaves on this site!  Those look gorgeous and sound like they will be delicious, can't wait to see the crumb and hear about how you liked this formula with the sprouted flour.

Syd's picture
Syd

Those are trademark David Snyder loaves.  I'd recognize one anywhere.  Your scoring is so distinct and you manage to achieve that rich, dark brown crust no matter what flour you use.  I look forward to seeing a cross section and reading your tasting notes.

All the best,

Syd

golgi70's picture
golgi70

say the loaves look great but I figured I'd wait for the crumb shot.  I too can't wait to see.  

Agreed those sure have David's signature on them.  I for one love the color you did get in the end

Josh

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

See the original post.

David

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

Love the reaction your wife had to the taste and texture. Will be interesting to see how it evolves of the next day or so. Do you always use banneton for your proofing shaped loaves ? I am trying to figure out the scoring and I think that the drying effect of the brotform cane on the dough must really make a difference over the floured cloth which gets moist and stays moist during proof. Thanks and don't mean to get off topic  but thought it might have been what helped the scoring on these loaves too. c

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I pointedly declined to offer Susan my own opinion, so her's was really unbiased. She is also a "super taster," so she sometimes comes up with things that surprise me.

These loaves were proofed in linen-lined wicker bannetons. I do also use cane brotformen. Some loaves - all baguettes and the San Joaquin Sourdoughs - are proofed on a linen couche. In terms of drying the loaf surface, I find the un-floured linen couch the best.

David

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I managed to wait till the crumb shots were posted before commenting.  I love the color of the crust - it's near a baked red as one can get.  That thick crust is great.  Not surpirsing that this bread is more substantial because it really is much more so.  I'm guessing it's the Harvest Mix that is throwing you off taste and crumb wise.   Once you bake the sprouted grain without the Harvest mix I think you get it sorted quickly.  Once I heard the loaf didn't spring as well as you thought it would, I thought the crumb holes would suffer some but 50% whole grains with all the add ins, it still looks killer enough to me for sure.

The color of the crumb is on the browner side rather than the tan side so the whole grains are really coming though in the crumb.   I'm sure we would like how this bread tastes.  The Harvest mix has me stumped.  I think Lucy  woudld rather make her own mix so she would know what is in it and pick what part of the hqrvet bounty to include.   We sort of do that for pretty much every bake as it is and are quite used to throwing stuff in and mixing it up depending on the cupbaoard harvest:-)

Ncie baking David

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the comment portion pof my post?

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hmmm ... Maybe Floyd has installed a Tinkerbell filter. You, know. If you don't believe in something, it no longer exists.

Try again, but this time, believe. ;-)

David

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

quite a bit lately.  It seems to happen if I walk awasy to do something else in the middle of posting,  I try not to understand or worry about what happens to some posts.   I'm guessing Tinkerbell would not be as diabolical as Floyd though:-)

Oh well, I was saying that I can't belive that I had the patience to wait to post until the crumb shots appeared.  An then the comment disappeared - how appropriate.  The crust is that beautiful shade of baked red we love so much - nice and thick too.  Nothing like a bold bake.  Even Lucy was impressed and it talkes a prett good bread  to keep her from going asleep most always.  I think once you bake the sprouted flour separate from the Harvest mix you will get it sorted out soon enough.  I'm surprised it doesn't taste fantastic too.  The low spring might be due to the sprouted flour's enzymes moving things long faster than normal and overproofing the dough before it could be noticed -just a thought.  .  . 

Lucy likes to make her own mixes she harvests from the bins and cupboards aroiund the homestead.  Knowinng what is in them and in what proportions gives her a peace of mind that usually only comes with a few of Sylvia's dog bones,

I agree with you that the crumb isn't bad at all for so 50% whole grains and add ins - I certainly don't get an open crumb close to yours at those levels.

The crumb is more brown than tan too, something we also like and that might be due to the whole grains. 

Nice baking as usual David. 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

For your kind words.

You are well-advised to watch out for that Tinkerbell. Don't be fooled! Underneath that sparkly, cute exterior in a green mini-skirt hides a hypomanic, manipulative, hardcore pixie dust junkie! I bet Lucy's on to her.

Getting back to bread: I agree that isolating variables is the next step.

David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

It's pretty much just as I had visioned it.  It's a beautiful test bread and I don't think it could be done any nicer than you have made.  

I can't comment on the flavor using a levain.  I've only baked used a commerical yeast.  The flour has a lovely sweetness and flavor.

I really enjoy muffins and scones with this flour and look forward to trying them with different added flours...nuts and fruits.  I've been planning on cranberry muffins...your post is very inspirational. 

I think this type of bread is best enjoyed toasted.  Mine didn't knock my socks off either...but then I'm not used to eating as vegan a bread as the one I made.

I think the addition of more BF would give more needed strength to such a grain filled bread.  The SWWF I think does add a lot of moisture retention in the crumb and it just doesn't bake out..imho...unless maybe a smaller amount is used.

Funny, I always think of this flour like using a dried vegetable.  I think it works wonderfully as muffins and I think I would like it very much with added regular flours to the mixture.  I was very impressed with the pizza made with 100% SWWF and the short ferment time having so much flavor.  Here's a little crumb shot I have of a yeasted version of a cinnamon roll.  Delicious, but very filling when again used 100% SWWF...but then your getting all those healthy benefits of the SWWF.  I just like to think of it as eating a baked vegetable : )

I'm looking forward to PR new book in the works.

This flour does not keep long and I keep mine in the freezer.

 

Sylvia

Sylvia

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I appreciate you sharing your experience with SWWF. I was very aware that this bread filled me up more than most, but the satiation did not last any longer than normal.

I can't say I got anything like "a lovely sweetness and flavor." I'm wondering if the flour and some other element aren't playing nicely together. Maybe the levain. Maybe the Harvest Grains.

Funny you should mention PR. My thought was to use his "100% Whole Wheat Bread" from BBA or the slightly different version in WGB as my next test. It's a very well known quantity and a favorite. It should be a good flavor test. My SFSD with 30% WW (but no seeds, sticks, roots or bark) may be a good test of the SWWF in a levain. With other WW flours, it's delicious.

This is turning into a project!

David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Would have gotten back to you sooner.  I had errands to run, dinner for Mike.

P. Reinhart's bread was the one I baked earlier, on my blog. The formula is at Rose L. B. 

Anyhoo, P.R. has said, rather than requiring a pre-ferment or long fermentation for depth of flavor, the flour proides this in much less time 'enzyme activity is already accomplished during the sprouting phase.'  The dough can be

held up to 3 days.

 The dough I used for the pizza was held up to 3 days.  P.R. has his pizza dough with WWSF, linked into RLB site too.  This is the pizza I made..the crust could have been thicker..but all in all delicious. http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/33799/100-sprouted-wheat-flour-bread-pizza 

P.R. gave a class on baking with the SWWF and R.B. has taken the class and commented what I said up above and baked the bread and given formula's for the loaves.  They do use a commercial yeast.  

I plan on making a version of her pan SWWF with the added Bread Flour and yeast.  My shipment has just arrived today from KA.  I was out of BF and glad to have some now.  My favorite,100% SWWF bread, not because I'm a pizza lover...was the pizza dough made with 100% SWWF.

Sylvia 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

David, if there is a problem with this link at Rose's site just type in search. best thing since pan bread..scroll down and you'll see the reference to the page.  Or try this one.. hope it works.  http://www.realbakingrose.com/.../sprouted_wheat_flour_the_best.html

Sorry

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I have some reading and some thinking to do.

David

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi David, 

Like Dab, I've been waiting for the crumb shot before commenting on this bake.

No doubt these are David Snyder loaves, they have your signature all over them with that rich dark crust you're known for.The profile looks good for a formula comprised of 52% weaker gluten flours. Being 50% of that is a first time for you using a sprouted flour in a mix, and noting your comments regarding the doughs consistency after mixing, I think the loaves have a good volume to them. Now that I've seen the crumb shot it does appear to me that the dough was slightly past prime for fermentation judging by the center portion of the crumb, which looks more closed than the majority of it. Your idea to reduce the percentage of levain is a good one IMO, as well I'd suggest not giving the dough an extended fermentation in the retarder until you're more familiar with how it behaves under typical conditions that can be monitored regularly during fermentation. Just a thought, but young and fresh as opposed to mature and sour may be what the sprouted flours lend themselves more to given how quickly they ferment. 

Cheers David,

Franko

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I appreciate your comments and suggestions very much!

The loaves did not seem to me to be over-proofed when I baked them, but I certainly agree that the crumb looks like they were. The crumb's dense texture and the (surprising) lack of sweetness support this. As does the paltry oven-spring and bloom.

I will certainly review your good suggestions before attempting this bread again.

David

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

for the info on the couche. I don't have real linen...I am using floured 100% cotton which is of course an entirely different beast. It works great to proof the breads in my cheap baskets as long as I bake in the cast iron but as I found today the open hearth bake is completely different. I have been meaning to purchase the linen by the yard from SFBI so shall add that to my list of things to get. The breads turned out wonderfully in spite of me and my lack of expertise with a stone and lava rocks !   Thanks again for being such a great resource. c