The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

A first and last ...

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PiPs's picture
PiPs

A first and last ...

This is the first loaf I have baked using flour from my new Grainmaker mill—and the last loaf I will bake in this kitchen that I have been posting from for almost two years. We are moving house this weekend and amongst the piles of packed boxes and chaos I thought it might be a fitting end to try and find some time to bake a loaf and upload a post about it.

 

 

You see, it was my new Komo mill and the excitement of milling my own flour that encouraged me to start actively contributing—after many years of lurking—on TheFreshLoaf. So it seems the thrill of my new Grainmaker mill should be a fitting close to the time we have spent in this lovely old house.

 

 

... anyway, best get back to it ... these boxes aren't going to pack themselves.

Cheers,
Phil

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Nice bread to end the old homestead with too.  Happy baking where ever you end up Phil.

Best wishes

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Thanks dabrownman,

We have almost ended up there ... a few more days to go.

All the best,
Phil

annie the chef's picture
annie the chef

Perfect  miche!

All the best with moving house and look forward to reading many more of your posts once you have settled in your new home.

Annie

PS. Do you still autolyse your dough for 12 hours before mixing in levain these day?

PiPs's picture
PiPs

The longest I am autolysing is about 2-5 hours ... it depends on the timing of my last levain build. I found the 12 hour autolyse a bit tricky in controlling dough temperatures. I like to keep to a schedule :)

All the best,
Phil

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

Your posts are always art worthy. Breathtaking photos. Good Luck on the move. I don't know why they don't make boxes that pack themselves...perhaps it needs to be suggested to those in charge :) Would love details on the new mill when you get back to posting. c

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Nat is a whizz at packing ... I am just the big dumb help that carries them around :)

Cheers,
Phil

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

And a stellar bread for auld lang syne.

Paul

PiPs's picture
PiPs

I was quite pleased with it ... a little over-proofed perhaps ... but still pleased :)

Cheers,
Phil

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Best of luck in your new house. 

Keep on baking.

Cheers,

Wingnut

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Will do :)

Cheers,
Phil

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Phil,

 Things in your life just seem to be coming at you full tilt lately.  Glad you got time for your holiday in Tasmania and that you were able to relax knowing what was in store for you when your returned home.

So where is this move taking you to now?  Sounds like you will be adjusting to your new mill and a new oven too.  Good thing you have a lot a baking experience behind you so the changes shouldn't be too much of a challenge though I know that learning the ins and outs of a new oven can be challenging…

.I am still adjusting to my new wall oven but didn't get much opportunity to use it this summer due to the heat.  Good old Cadco is my comfort oven :)  After using it daily for a year now I finally fell pretty comfortable with it.  It has been doing great with the higher temps. I have been experimenting with - inspired by you!

Good luck with the move.  Always a fun time to explore a new area.  

Take Care,

Janet

PiPs's picture
PiPs

mmmm ... just lost all the comments I wrote to you ... grrr!

Lets try again,

We have moved closer to the water. A short jog and I can be at a tiny peninsular and look out at the islands off the coast of Brisbane. Lots of Kite-surfers out the other day. Being a bit of a mad kite-flyer myself I sat and watched them for what seemed like hours. Mesmerising!

The new oven looks better than what I am currently using ... but ... I should be baking less at home in a lovely little oven ... stay tuned :)

Cheers,
Phil

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Phil,
Congratulations on your new place, and new mill - the mill is a beauty. I hope it brought joy, using it for the first time, milling the flour for this gorgeous miche.
Your miche is exemplary, like all of your breads; the diamond scoring pattern, and crumb, are especially beautiful.
I hope all goes well with packing and your move!
:^) breadsong

PiPs's picture
PiPs

The mill brought joy and a bit of sweat :)

... actually it was really easy going (no sweat) ... patience is required more than strength :)

Spent the day cleaning!

Cheers,
Phil

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Congratulations on the new mill. It's a beaut, for sure.

The bread in the photos is just stunning, and the photos are technically magnificent. I'm awestruck.

David

PiPs's picture
PiPs

You are too kind ... It helps to be taking photos of bread that I enjoy so much.

Cheers,
Phil

jefklak's picture
jefklak

Amazing pictures, looks very jummy. 

I have no experience with milling my own flour at all, but I wonder, what's the biggest difference between your komo and the hand mill? Why would you buy a big hand mill, except for the great workout and to be able to use it without electricity? Just curious. The grainmaker looks very impressive, but you'd need some space to put it somewhere. 

 

PiPs's picture
PiPs

The biggest difference between the two mills is the RPM's of the grinding surface. The Komo is a great mill and I love it dearly ... but it is a shredder. I can control the distance between the stones but they still spin at an insanely fast speed. All the bran is torn to very fine pieces. I have never been able to achieve big pieces of bran separation. This is important when I choose to sift high extraction flours.

All the stone-millers I have spoken to talk about the slow tuning speed of the large stones and how it gently pulls off large pieces of bran. When I slowly turn the large steel plates on the Grainmaker—it has a larger grinding surface than the Komo—I can see large pieces of bran falling almost separately from the flour. It is a beautiful thing to see.

You also feel more connected to the flour you are making ... thats my hippie answer :)

Cheers,
Phil

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

That's a beautiful, eye-candy sort of miche with its lovely scoring and open crumb!

Thanks so much for the details about why you chose the hand mill, as a lover of high extraction flours that is all very good to know.

Best of luck with the move!

ananda's picture
ananda

A great way to christen the mill Phil,

and a lovely final loaf to move on with.

Very best wishes in your new abode

Andy

PiPs's picture
PiPs

The day is disappearing away from me here ... almost dark outside ...

The new abode is good ... much cleaner today after I spent the day there wiping down walls!

Cheers,
Phil

isand66's picture
isand66

Good luck on your move.  I hope it is to someplace you will enjoy with your family for a long time and enjoy baking in the future.

Regards,

Ian

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Looking good so far. Fine weather is predicted!

Cheers,
Phil

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

On to the next adventure with a flourish!

Great way to end a chapter - a great read brim full of artful flavor, your audience on the edge of their seats ready for the next chapter.

So off you go! And don't forget to post..,

Wild-Yeast 

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Will do my best :)

Cheers,
Phil

dakkar's picture
dakkar

Hi,

Isn't 85% water a bit on the high side? How do you handle the dough?

Thanks!

PiPs's picture
PiPs

The large amount of levain is at lower hydration (60%) ... so that will bring down the overall dough hydration ... also ... I am using freshly milled flour—this flour was sifted down to 80% extraction—and this flour is very thirsty!

So I still had to treat the dough carefully ... it was pretty slack and I decided to give it two folds during the bulk ferment ... after that it was pretty easy to shape :)

All the best,
Phil

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hi, Phil

A breathtaking miche! is the illustration on picture above yours?

Wishing the best of luck in your move.

-Khalid

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Yeah, they were some drawings I knocked up. They were photographed before bringing them into photoshop ... something different ... kinda old school :)

Cheers,
Phil