The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

99.89% Whole Grain Sesame & Flax Seed Sourdough with Whey

  • Pin It
dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

99.89% Whole Grain Sesame & Flax Seed Sourdough with Whey

With English muffins and bagels out of the way this week and breakfast taken care of for several weeks, we moved on to our normal Friday bread bake.  We wanted to stick to our 100% whole grain recent theme, this time 99.89% while getting back to some of favorite add ins and return of the neglected; Toadies,  ground flax and sesame seeds.

 

Lucy wanted to shy away from the chewy bits in the crumb this week so, no sprouts or  scalded whole berries were used but, to make up for the missing, we added yogurt whey that we had frozen from the last batch of NF yogurt we made.  The protein will be kicked up and notch with the whey making this even healthier than it looks.

 

With the whey for dough liquid we were really going for the sour so we decided to pump it up some with a new levain retard schedule where we took out our stiff 66% hydration whole wheat and rye starter that has been in the fridge for a week and retarded the levain for 24 hours after the 2nd and 3rd stages rather than our usual retard after the 3rd stage only.

 

We fed the levain the 25% portion of bran that we had sifted out of our home milling of rye, spelt, farro and wheat.  We had 101 g left so it went into the levain in stages to make a 100% hydration leaven.

  

This put most of the whole grain equivalent into the levain so it would soak and soften for a as long as possible.  The rest of the whole grain equivalents; malts and Toadies, went into the 2 hour autolyse with the King Arthur white whole wheat.

 

We held back 36 g of water to squish the higher than normal salt though the autolyse when it had finished as we added the levain.  Normally we would have 1 or 2 g less of salt but with the whey in the mix we decided a little over 2% with the whole grains might slow things down a little bit and keep the dough from exploding while in the fridge.

 

We did our normal 10 minutes of slap and folds which was 2 slaps and 1 fold as the dough was on the stiff side even though it was at 85% hydration.  90% or more probably would have been better in hindsight but ti eventually smoothes out.  We rested the dough for 20 minutes before the first of (3) sets of S& F’s were dome on 20 minute intervals

 

After a 20 minute rest following the last S&F, we pre-shaped the dough into a boule and then 10 minutes later finished the job.   We put it into one of our favorite baskets, retrieved from the garage, which we had not used for a while.  Since the basket was well used it didn’t take much rice flour to get it back into bread shape before the dough went in.

 

A grilled cheese and chicken Tzitzel lunch on shaping day.

We then got out a new trash can liner and placed the basket inside before sealing with a rubber band and placing it into the fridge for an118 hour retard.  We liked what the long 20 hour cold did for the bagels earlier this week so we thought this bread would do well at 18 hours - even with the whey as liquid.  Luckily there wasn’t too much spelt bran in the mix

 

After 20 hours, we were a little shocked that the dough wasn’t fully proofed so that we could bake it straight out of the fridge.   So, on the counter it went for proofing until it had risen 90%.  We de-basketed it onto the parchment lined vented top of the mini oven’s broiler pan and styled it with Ian’s T-Rex slash.

 

We decided to do a cloche with a stainless steel mixing bowl for steaming instead of our normal (2) of Sylvia’s steaming cups.  The bottom of the broiler pan was preheated to 500 F in the mini oven.   Before the stainless covered bread went into the heat we tossed a quarter cup of water into hot broiler pan bottom and then covered it with the vented top holding the cloched bread above the water for a new kind of mega steam technique – under the dome.

 

 After 2 minutes we tuned the oven down to 475 F and continued to steam for another 13 minutes before removing the bottom of the broiler and the steam with it.  E then turned the oven down to 425 F, convection this time and baked the bread for another 10 minutes rotating it 180 degrees every 5 minutes until it read 205 F on the inside with the probe thermometer.

 

The bread sprang, bloomed and browned as my apprentice expected.  She sometimes reminds me of ancient Grecian oracles of note who could see the future as easily as Lucy can see the long nose on her face. 

 

What a great sunset last night to go along with today's lunch.  Just a delicious sandwich bread .

The crumb was soft, open, moist and very sour - just the way we like it.  Tomorrow we hope it is even more sour - and it likely will be.  The crust stayed crispy as it cooled  and was the tastiest part by far.  We like this bread a lot.

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

11

0

0

11

2.59%

25% Extracted Bran

20

30

45

95

22.33%

Water

20

30

45

95

22.33%

Total

51

60

90

201

47.24%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

101

23.62%

 

 

 

Water

101

23.62%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

22.43%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

White Whole Wheat

325

76.38%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

325

76.38%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

2.12%

 

 

 

Whey

296

69.57%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

91.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

426

100.00%

 

 

 

Whey 296 & Water 101

397

93.18%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

93.18%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

99.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

85.18%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

896

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

5

1.18%

 

 

 

White Malt

5

1.18%

 

 

 

Toadies

15

3.53%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

25

5.88%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

15

3.53%

 

 

 

Total

65

15.28%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

MisterTT's picture
MisterTT

on the crust! I'm sure the crumb is just as good.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

on bread like few other heat sources, especially oes that are inexpensive and don't cont much to operate. The loaf next Friday will be that elusive 100% rye SD with a 12 hour minimum retard - my apprentice might even Dapumperize it. Glad you like the bread Mister and the crumb came out about the way we expected.

Happy baking

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

You amaze me, what comes out of your mini!  You've got the heat beat baking outside.  

Did I ever tell you how my dad put an oven in a little protective shed outside.  It was for my mom to do mostly her pie baking, in the hot Las Vegas summertime.  She would line her pies up on long table outside to cool.  They were mostly good English style apple pies.  She would then freeze them for enjoying later.  

Questions : ) Did you put holes in the parchment paper lining to let the steam in and what size is your steel bowl?  

I tried to find a s.s bowl that fit among my collection.  The best I came up with was my porcelain/iron pot.  I removed the metal knob, so it would just fit in my oven.  Worked great...I just tested a small roll in it..could have done a small loaf.

Ha!  apprentice size loaf/roll

Sylvia

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is 9 1/2 " x 3 3/4 ".  I have a Pyrex bowl that is 9" X 4" and it fits too.  If I don't use the vented top I have another 9" 4 1/4 SS bowl that fits too.  Got all 3 at Goodwill, where else for a whopping $3 total on dollar Thursday.  I learned from making tamales using parchment instead of corn husks that the steam just penetrates several layers of parchment no problem - so no hole poking is required to let the steam in.

Your knotted roll is so cute.  It looks like it was blistered too!  Your Dad really took care of your mother building her a bake station outside.  My Grandfather was very handy and built a carport with a shed at the end on our house in KCMO and a 12' square concrete patio that was 12" thick on one end and 8" thick on the other for the backyard.  I think you could have landed a 747 in it.  My twin and I used the patio as boxing ring after school and before the parents got home for work.  Kids would come from all over to watch the twins fight bare knuckle.  What a bloody mess :-)

He later asked my Dad to send one of the twins to him to spend the summer in Topeka to help him with a project on his house.  I got the nod by asking to go to keep from getting beat up all the time.  The project was to hand dig with pick and shovel a full sized basement under his entire house, pour a concrete  floor and lay concrete block and stone walls to hold the house up.  Once that was done we had to dig a trench around the outside to lay tile at the footings and waterproof the outside.  Only my Grandpaw would ever attempt something like that :-)  After that experience I knew I wanted to go be an architect or contractor and get paid for stupid things like that.

Glad you like the bread Sylvia.  This steaming method seems to work nearly as good as your steaming cups ... You will get a full sized loaf in yours one day but 1,000 g or so is about as big as I would attempt out of a pan.

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

apologies if you have explained this before, but I am totally flummoxed

thanks - SF

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

for Toady Tom's Tasty Toasted Tidbits.  I got tire of having to write that out when posting so, now they are just plain old  Toadies.  A Fresh Lofian;  toad.de.b posted a bread where he had dry pan toasted some wheat germ and bran until golden for an flavor add in .  I tried it out and found it to be the flavor enhancer bread ever had added to it - with the possible exception of aromatic seeds.    Just about anything can end up in Toadies.  I put the 25% sifted out bran and endosperm from the grain berries I mill at home, oat bran, wheat germ, corn meal, sometimes flax, sesame and poppy seeds too.  Toad,de.b really ruined regular non Toadie bread for me. 

Happy Toading   

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

people start seeing through the mad scientist schtick and realize that you have become an accomplished baker.  :0

That's an absolutely gorgeous loaf!  Thanks for sharing it.

Paul

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

parts store when looking of possible bread ingredients - something my apprentice and possibly Ian too - have not done :-)

One thing just sort of leads to another when it comes to bread baking and figuring out a formula.  When you mill your own flour you have to put in red and white malt - so you have to make those.  If you have a bunch of whole grains in bread  you need VWG to make sure things don't fall flat - so you have to make that. 

If you want extra sour bread you need whey so you make Greek yogurt and drain off the whey or you buy regular yogurt and you sieve out the whey.  If you want beer like i do and even want some in bread, it is best to make your own and a lot more fun too if you can remember it.    Bread with Toadies taste about twice as good as bread without them so you have to make some. 

Breads with sprouts and or whole berry scalds are just better in the chew substance and crumb than breads that don't have them so you have to grow or boil them   Home milled flour is way better than just about anything you can buy without having to trade your first born for it - so you start milling.

You want whole grain multi-grain bread because it is more healthy, has a lower GI and tastes better too so, you have to get a bunch of different whole grains to mill.  Then you want the bran to soak as long as possible as levain feed to soften it up as best you can so you have to sift it out of all the milled flours too.

You have to have aromatic seeds, all kinds of other seeds, a variety of nuts and dried fruits just to be a well rounded baker so you need to round all of that stuff up.  Then you want to make even more sour so you retard starters, levains and dough for as long as you can and the next thing you know it takes a week to make a decent loaf of bread loaf of bread that would last half day if my apprentice had anything to say about it and I didn't freeze 3/4th of it :-)

I know most folks wouldn't go through all the effort to do it all yourself - for a simple loaf of bread - but when you are retired you can blame it on alshiemer's at the very least....and they don't know what they are missing :-)

Thanks for the compliment.  It means a lot coming from an accomplished bread baker and teacher like you.  I've worked hard at it the past couple years to be the best baker I can be so i'm less of a mad scientist today than I was and more just plain mad hell ...as in .....insane :-) 

You would like the way this bread tastes the best.  Thanks and happy baking Paul.  You made my day.

gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

Yep, in a word. AWESOME!

Diane

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

in a good way.  Very tasty indeed and we like it a lot. This was a fun bake but next time we will up the hydration another 5% or so - even it spreads a little. Glad you like it. This bread  can take a while to make but it is worth it - especially if you have nothing else to do!.   

Happy baking and Lucy looks forward to the Next GMA's Creation - the original NGC.

Lulabelle's picture
Lulabelle

That's a great looking loaf!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

It tastes as good as it looks. Thanks....

and happy baking

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi dabrownman,
Stunning loaf, so much work and so many good things that went into it.
And thanks again for another amazing sunset photo -
can't ever remember seeing a rose-and-lilac-colored sky like that!
:^) breadsong

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

in the desert.  The only ones I have seen that were consistantly better were in Japan - wish I had a digital camera then.  The setting sun on the BC coast is spectacular too if they are like the photo that John posted not long ago. 

This was a fun bake and it is always a special treat when everything seems to come together - at least once in a while :-)

Glad you like the bread and i'm looking forward to your next post!

Happy baking breadsong.

isand66's picture
isand66

This is one of your best looking loafs.  Excellent shaping and your crust is perfect.  This looks like a perfect bread for a sandwich.

Great baking DA.

Regards

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

so well I can add a couple of little extra ones :-) I actually used a single edge razor for this one instead of an old hack saw blade:-)  The mini oven really puts a crust on bread.  You are right about the shaping.   The hydration was low, even though the percent was high,  and the gluten was developed very well, even with so much bran in it, so I gave special attention to shaping it well. Good flour never hurts either.  Never had a bread stand so tall in the basket.  It didn't even want to touch the side of the basket as it rose.

The best part is the taste.  It's the most sour bread to date and it made a fine grilled chicken sandwich for lunch today.   A nice bread all the way around.  Now we have to do that 12- 18  hour retard on a 100% whole rye, 100% hydration sourdough......

Thanks for the compliment Ian.  Can't wait to see what comes out of your oven this weekend.

Happy Baking.

 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Nice baking Dab.  This looks great.  When you write multigrain what does that consist of?

Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The home milled 25% sifted out parts of bran and what nots fed to the levain, came from 50% wheat, 25% rye and 25% split between spelt and farro.  It changes all the time depending on what I am baking and these percents are estimates.  It is a fine tasting bread - by far its best attribute,.  Glad you like it Josh and

Happy Baking,

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Wow!  The crust alone has me drooling.  What a gorgeous loaf!  And the crumb looks just perfect.  Thanks for sharing another beauty!

Marcus

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

this bread Marcus.    It really does taste as good as it looks and the crust is especially drool worthy :-)

Happy baking Marcus.

Franko's picture
Franko

A very nice looking loaf dabrownman! Blistery, well coloured, attractively scored and with a good high profile that goes along perfectly with that first rate crumb. Good baking my friend!

Cheers,

Franko 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Franko.   When things come together well it makes up for all the ugly ones :-)  This bread tastes great and I don't miss the usual sprouts or scald much either due to the extra sour the whey brought to the party.  I cut back a little bit on the hydration for this bread from 91% to 85%  to try to keep it from spreading as much.  Home milled flour can be very thirsty but ,since this had so much KA white whole wheat in it , cutting the water back was the right thing to do.  The crumb isn't as open as usual but it is all relative.  It sure rose and sprang well.  All in all a good baking day. 

Once again thanks for critique and I look forward to your next post.

Happy baking Franko.    

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

Every one of the pictures! Again you have outdone yourself...how long can this go on? lol

How long did you leave the bowl covering on? Looks like a great idea, I wonder if the KA bowl would stand up to the heat?

First day without having A/C on, kind of muggy but blessedly quiet. Too hot to bake or even cook though. Next month the garden will be mostly a memory and we will be on the lookout for the first real frost, hard to believe.

Barbra

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The bowl was on for 12 minutes this time instead of the usual 15 and then it took a little longer than usual to get to 205 F on the inside.   I'm sure the KA bowl would work fine too.  Too tall for the mini oven though:-)

Its been so long since the garden went up in smoke here I can't even remember anything ever being green.   It  has been 111F-113F the last couple of days with rain at night to make the world the next day look...... hazy and sweltering! The kitchen is 84 F even with the A/C on.  Makes for great baking as things proof up very fast and well in the fridge :-)  We look forward to days below 100 F.

There is some scientific research out there that seems to prove that the older we get the slower time seems to move for us.   I'm not sure what cleaver experiment they dreamt up to prove that  but it sure seems to fly for me!

Happy baking Barbra

 

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Hi dabrownman,

Have been meaning to find time to comment on this bread from the moment I saw it. Is this your best ever? It looks fantastic! I love how your bread formulas just overwhelm me ... so much going on there it makes my eyes water :)

Like the use of whey too ...

Cheers,
Phil

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

looking slashed breads that my apprentice has formulated.  Very tasty with the home millede flour mix and whey - nice and sour.  Since I'm down to baking 1 loaf of bread a week, we have joined the slow bread movement.  Now it it tales a week to make a loaf with all the retards :-)  Plus this time of year it its too hot to move fast anyway.  Many steaming experiments show that the mini oven really puts the crust on bread, like nothing else, no matter how you steam in it .  I think it must be the small space and no lack of steam. 

The mini is a real godsend in the summer.  I made some green chili stew on the stove top last night and it was so hot in the kitchen my wife said I can't do that any more.  So now I need to use the gas burner on the side of the grill. Might as well build a kitchen outside if you can't use the one one the inside.

Thanks Phil and I look forward to your next post and book on your discovering and recording old brick ovens and the breads you can make in them.

Happy baking Phil

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

I agree this is your best looking loaf yet! Keep up the good work!

Cheers,

Wingnut

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

You sure have been turning out some mice loaves of late too. The bread just keeps getting better all around TFL bakeries it seems.   Must be something in the air....or a lot of practice going on.

Glad you liked the bread Wing and happy baking.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

i agree, it is one of your best looking breads thus far, DA. There is no match to covered baking, except of course a giant steam deck oven.

i didn't understand the part of creating the mega steam. Why would you steam a cloch covered bread?

-Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The top cover of the broiler pan is vented.  If I baked on it covered on this some steam would escape out of the holes in the bottom.  So, I put some water in the bottom of the broiler pan which supplied additional seam under the the stainless steel bowl. through these holes.

I have to admit, I missed the sprouts or scald that gives my normal bread a great chew for the crumb but this bread was healthy enough as it was and plenty tasty - not to mention easier to score:-)

You would like this bread Khalid but the kids may not like the extra sour the yogurt whey provides.

Happy baking

evonlim's picture
evonlim

hi dabrownman, what a great loaf!! beautiful crust and crumb and the scoring. all that in a mini oven, bravo!!!

evon

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is a versatile kitchen appliance. Anything you can do in a big oven, you can co better on a smaller scale in the MO.  So many different ways to steam when making bread too.  This was the bread I used as the basis for the fig, walnut. pumpkin and sunflower seed added bread baked this past Friday.  This one looked better and tasted fine but the last one tasted even better.  Now I need one that looks and tastes great!  Another reason to bake next Friday :-)

Happy baking Evon