The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

100% Khorasan wheat bread (K***T)

  • Pin It
Abelbreadgallery's picture
Abelbreadgallery

100% Khorasan wheat bread (K***T)

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I have worked with that kamut and I have found it to have the characteristic of being very stretchty and as a result my boules tended to flatten unless I included other flours or tinned the dough in a supportive pan. It was  my favorite for a gorgeous color and the flavor was delightful.

So this has no other flours? It is Beautiful!

bruneski's picture
bruneski

truly great! Congrats!

Have a great weekend!

Skibum's picture
Skibum

What is Khorasan wheat???

TIA, Brian

Skibum's picture
Skibum

Kamut in my first bake after holidays.  For now I will stick to tried and true.  That really is a beautiful loaf!  I love the 'grin' and the reddish colour to the crust.  Okay, I too request a crumb shot!

Regards, Brian

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Nice looking bread.  I would like to hear your thoughts and ideas after working with this particular wheat.

Jeff

Abelbreadgallery's picture
Abelbreadgallery

Khorasan wheat is an ancient grain type; "Khorasan" refers to an historical region in the northeast of Iran, which was once much larger than modern-day Khorasan Province. This grain is twice the size of modern-day wheat and is known for its rich nutty flavor. Since 1990 KAMUT has been registered as a trademark by Kamut International.

Yes, this bread is 100% kamut, or maybe 99,9%. I made the Kamut sourdough starting from a tsp of whole wheat flour sourdough.

Kamut is an enjoyable flour to work with. It admits a great % of water. This bread contains 75% water. It was made of 100 gr kamut sourdough (100% hyd), 450 kamut flour, 325 ml of water and 10 gr of salt.

I suggest you a long autolysis, about 1 hour. You don't have to knead the dough very much, it's better to use the stretch and fold method. About baking, it's better to bake it 10C less than usual, and more steam than usual.

Have a nice day.

 

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Thank you for your comments.

Jeff

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Beautiful loaf and photo.  I use Kamut a lot too but have had the same sad results as Clazar123 when trying to bake a 100% Kamut free form.  If I use 100% I now will shape and bake it in a pan.  How did you get yours to spring?

Janet

Abelbreadgallery's picture
Abelbreadgallery

The method I used was this:

100 gr kamut sourdough (100% hyd), 450 kamut flour, 325 ml of water and 10 gr of salt. Mix sourdough + water + flour. Let it rest 1 hour. Add salt. Knead about five minutes. Bulk fermentation: 6 hours at room temperature, stretching and folding 2-3 times the first 2 hours. Preshape a ball. Let it rest 15 minutes. Shape a ball. Keep it into a proffing basket. You can cover it and put into the fridge and bake it next day, or you can rest the dough at room temperature, about 3 hours, and bake it.

For one piece like this, bake it about 50 minutes, beggining at 240C (464F) with a lot of steam, and finishing at 170C (338) without steam.

Have a nice day!

Abel

www.breadgallery.wordpress.com

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

75% hydration for a home milled whole grain Kamut to be too low for big holes but yours sprang very well none the less.  What does the crumb look like?  I would expect it to be open but no huge holes like other semolina type breads of this hydration .- but very sweet in taste.  It certainly has the semolina color on the outside that is so striking and i like so much - nothing else like it.

Well done and happy baking - look forward the crust shot,

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

This is a lovely grain with a wonderful flavor. I've been using it for about 6 years.

I will confess that, although I'm a dedicated home-miller, it's been a few years since I milled it into flour for bread. However, the previous comments pretty much agree with my own experience.

If you own a grain mill that can crack grain, kamut gives a lovely cracked grain similar to bulgur (or cracked wheat). It cracks very cleanly and you can use it instead of bulgur for tabouli or cook the cracked grain as a substitute for rice. It has a very nice flavor.

It is price-y at my geographical location (NE USA) but it is really a wonderful grain for many purposes. I recommend it.

ww's picture
ww

hi abel,

just wanted to say I used your formula, except I used my wholewheat leaven (not kamut flour). Thanks! It was a lovely loaf.

dabrownman, here's a crumb shot. You must forgive the bad photo, the uneven slicing, and the crumb was more gummy than it should have been because I couldn't resist and cut into it too soon (tsk tsk tsk...). 

Abelbreadgallery's picture
Abelbreadgallery

Congratulations! Nice job!

Have a nice day.

Abel Sierra.

www.breadgallery.wordpress.com