The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

pullman loaf

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qahtan's picture
qahtan

pullman loaf

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/files/48/loaf_0.jpg

qahtan's picture
qahtan

Sorry, i did a double  take on the above.

I find it a challenge to bake a loaf in these pans, to get the right amount of dough to fill the corners but not too much to make a hard top.

any one else have such a problem.  ??     qahtan

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Hi qahtan,

This is more of a 'trial and error' issue than an actual problem.  There are many sizes of Pullman pans and the dough amount does need to be exact or at least very close.  I use a scale and always weigh the dough going into the pan.  Keep notes on the results so that the next bake is as good or better.

Jeff

david earls's picture
david earls

my Pullman pans are 9" long, and a dough formula starting with 450g of flour is just about perfect. The recipe I followed was adapted from one for a long Pullman pan; I just calculated the volumes and adjusted formula easily.

This is one reason formulas are so great - you can adjust your baking to suit the number of people you're feeding - or adjust to fit the gear you're using.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

so much math in a long time till I started baking bread and reading TFL  I'm beginning to think baking it is more of a science than art :-) Math never tasted so good before either,

david earls's picture
david earls

they invented the spreadsheet.

I have all my formulas in a spreadsheet. I can enter total hydration and total flour at the top of any page, and all my ingredients instantly recalculate. I even have a "master" page on which I can enter the volume measurements of any recipe and instantly calculate all my baker's percentages. Each of my formulas occupies a separate tab in my spreadsheet, and so I can record all my baking notes.

Science becomes art in bread.

DavidEF's picture
DavidEF

david earls,

I was wondering if you have a master formula you always use, or if you have more than one spreadsheet, or how else do you change a recipe? If the only fields you enter to the spreadsheet are "total hydration" and "total flour" then it sounds like you've got exactly one way of making bread. For instance, I sometimes use more or less of things like sugars, salt, milk, etc by percentage, to see what works better and makes bread taste more like what I'm looking for. Then again, I'm new to baking since just a few months ago. I have a spreadsheet I use, but every ingredient has a field that I may change to suit my experimental side.

DavidEF's picture
DavidEF

Oops, david earl, I just re-read your post. You already said you keep your various formulas in tabs. Oh well.

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 Bread baking and any kind of math do not go together in my book

 all the talk of hydration and percentages, spreadsheets ect is not me ...

When I make bread , my basic white bread as I have posted earlier, 1 litre of warm tap water when I add the flour it is dip and scoop.

with this recipe I leave out yea amount white flour and replace it with fresh ground whole wheat flour I some times add

malt maybe brown sugar instead of white, I just add what ever I think would made a nice loaf.

I have been know to crush weetabix and add them to my dough. I some times add cheese or as I say what ever.

toasted walnuts, Guinness any thing.

Sweet dough also gets what ever.

 I know this is a very hit and miss way of making bread but I have been doing this for the past 56 years and had no complaints .....yet. every one appears to enjoy my bread products.

Pizza, same basic dough.           qahtan