The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Farmer's Market Week 11 CranPoppy Spelt (60% WholeGrain)

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golgi70's picture
golgi70

Farmer's Market Week 11 CranPoppy Spelt (60% WholeGrain)

So my love for spelt continues to grow.  I loved the poppy baguettes and thought cranberries with be a nice addition. Continued with the intentionally low profile elongated batard which yields more slightly smaller and more crusty slices.  I tried the staggered retard to get through this bake and was mostly successful but saw the dough acting less vigorously towards the last. bake.  Had they all been baked in the first round all would have been quite well with the world.  

CranPoppy Spelt

Makes 1 - 943 g loaf

Build 1 (12 hours)

2 Starter

20 Spelt

20 h20

-------------

build 2 (4 hours)

40 g  First Build

60 g  Freshly Milled Whole Spelt

36 g  H20

---------------

Dough:

190 g  Strong Flour

10   g  Fresh Milled Whole Rye

220 g  Freshly Milled Whole Spelt

300 g  H20

25 g   Poppy Seed

12 g   Sea Salt

50 g   Cranberries

------------------------

Autolyse Flours, Poppy Seed, and H20 for 2 hours

Add Levain and Salt and mix to combine.  

Develop to medium and then add cranberries and stir in on speed. 1

bulk Ferment 3 1/2 hours (4 S +_F) @ 30 minute intervals

Shape/Proof

Bake 480 Steam for 12 minutes

460 for 18-22 more.

 

Happy Baking

Josh

 

And the Bounty.  We got pickling cucumbers (my first small batch of half sours came out really go so I'm gonna make a bigger batch today), brocolli, walla walla and spring onions, goat feta, pluots, pears, asian pears, salad lettuce, local dried herb mix, some sugar snap peas.

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The crust and crumb are both gorgeous. Has to be a very healthy and tasty bread to go with the god looks.  Can't wait to see what you get for this bread.

Happy baking.

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Thanks Dab.  With your inspiration I'm using as many whole grains and add ins as I can.  After the past few though I think I'm gonna actually go simpler next week and break my rules and do a repeat loaf.  Reason/  Well it was requested so I figure I should honor my first request.  Sesame Levain take 2 next week.  Takes a lot of the thinking out of it which is nice.  

Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

have been simple ones, for me, so after the Tizitzel I'm going the other way and back to more complex breads.  I see you got some very nice fruits and veggies with this weeks barter to.  I get that stuff for 50 cents a pound this time a year and your bread should go for $3 a pound.  Still think you are being short changed at the market so it is no wonder you are getting requests now :-)

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Let me inform you a bit more about what I'm trading for.  I live in very Northern California, hippy land, and all of this produce is organic and grown locally (within 50 miles) and most of it is picked fresh for the market within 24 hours.  I really love to buy local first and organically second.

 I make 12 loaves and end up trading about 8 or 9 and I get $35-50 worth of product if I were to be paying cash.  I rate my loaves at $5 a piece in value and just let them know what I'm interested in and allow them to offer what they deem fair. From a cost perspective I'm doing quite fine as my batches are costing as little as 7 dollars to produce and upwards of 20 when the add ins are pricey.  All in all I think I'm doing pretty good.  Plus I really love the barter system.  I just wish I could find a way to barter with ordinary folks as well as the same farmers I see every week.  I want to just put up a sign saying Organic Sourdough Bread for trade and sit down and see what happens but they may not like me doing that at the market.  Maybe when this market ends I'll start something up via social networking to sell/barter breads with any/all on Sundays.  But thats a ways off as this market runs til the week before thanksgiving.

Josh

isand66's picture
isand66

Nice looking loaves Josh.  Looks like the crumb came out perfecto!

Ian

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Thanks Ian.  

yes the first loaves came out quite nice with a slight curve in the wrong direction over the four bakes.  All in all they came out well but a few things would have improved the loaves.  First off I should have used proofing bowls instead of couche to get better height.  Secondly this bread does not want a low slow proof.  It would have benefited from a shorter warmer proof.  Looks like my cap of whole grain in retarded doughs has been found.  Now to work my way down to an appropriate percentage that can handle a short overnight retard.  My guess is 50-55% will be my sweet spot.  40% works like a charm.  62 % worked but showed signs of failure.  None the less it tastes quite nice.  As you already know I am a fan of spelt with poppy seeds.  A great combination of flavor and texture.  And previous to this bake I've worked with mostly spelt flour and now know that stone ground fresh spelt is just superior in taste and texture.  Sorry to ramble on.  Thanks again

And Happy Baking

Josh

isand66's picture
isand66

No problem...ramble away :).  Look forward to your further experimentation until you get it just the way you want if that's actually possible!  Since I don't bake for anyone except myself and friends I tend to try new formulas all the time with the exception of pretzel rolls and sometimes hamburger buns.  It's just too much fun to try and come up with new flavor profiles or try new techniques or formulas, but if I were to sell or barter my wares like you I would certainly be inclined to stick with the same similar formulas until I got them just right.

Anyway, now look who's rambling!

Happy Baking.

Ian

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

You nailed it Josh.  You really hit this one.  This looks so good!  When I get my confidence for higher whole grain free form loaves, I will try this for sure.

Thanks for this post man.  Now go enjoy this loaf, lucky boy.

John

golgi70's picture
golgi70

John based on some of the breads you have baked in the little time you've been baking I think you need to let go of your fears and make the breads you desire.  That rye you made looks of top notch high end bakery quality.  Along with many of your other loaves.  Just prepare for whatever journey it is you are to take.  Before starting write your time table so as to have no conflicts of scheduling.  And write out your notes/formula for said style of bread to keep on hand.  And you are bound for success.  Plus you have TFL for any emergency questions which generally get answered quickly.  

Thanks for the compliments and never fear a formula but instead take on the challenge.  

Whats the worst that could happen?  An unattractive yet usually tasty piece of bread to eat?  And additionally there is usually a lot of knowledge gained.

Josh

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Josh, I appreciate your support and kind words.  What recent rye loaf are you referring to?

I had some issues of late with whole wheat formulas. All 4 loaves turned out perfect for the garbage.  Looks like from the feedback I gained on this site it was due to too high temps while bulk fermenting and also retarding in fridge overnight may have made it worse.  I am confident on some loaves, just not high % whole wheat....yet :)

John

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I refer to the seeded rye with wheat berries and spelt.  Those loaves are picture perfect.  So are the Whole Rye Wheat loaves you made.  Then your most recent BC day bakes look fabulous.  Rye is more finicky to work with than whole wheat in my humble opinion.  

I can't find the post with your said "failed" wheat.  Got any photos and a formula?  Lets set you up for success.  With the success you've shown, undoubtedly you can produce high percentage wheat bread.  Sure timing is crucial but we can allot for that and set you up for nothing less than success. 

 

Josh