The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Prince George's Chacon

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Prince George's Chacon

King George V of England, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia and Wilhelm II of Germany were cousins. Their family squabbles created WW1 a war that could not be settled until the end of WW2.

  

Prince George was named after King George VI; the ‘Stuttering King’.  George VI was king during WW2 and was the father of Queen Elizabeth who took the throne in 1952, some 61 years ago.  She is the great, grand mother of the newly arrived Price George.

 

With all of this history, the design of the Prince George Chacon was not easy.  The rye flour and rye sprouts came from his German connections mainly but also from his Russian ones.  Even the Windsor name was adopted by King George the 5th in 1917 from the real German royalty of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha.

 

German sounding royalty in England during WW1 was not a good thing in their royal eyes.  The English Samuel Smith’s Imperial Stout used for the liquid in the dough was first presented to the Royal Imperial Court of Russia where it was a favorite.  It was also very tasty and not poisonous.   I wanted to be the official taste taster like The Prince would have.  Just trying to keep the bake in line with the royal theme.

 

I forgot to put the aromatic seeds I had ready to go so I chalk that up to Queen Elizabeth’s old age so, no seeds is a tribute to her adn my wprthless apprentice who is supposed to reminds her master of these forgottenn things.  It’s not much of a tribute but better than some funnier ones that come to mind and associated with her ancient age on the throne.

 

The chacon is a favorite shaping technique we use for special occasions and celebrations.  The corn meal and wheat are from America the home of the baker, the new home of my German apprentice and the USA was once an unruly British colony.

 

The corn meal also represents the common heritage of the Prince’s mother and our wish that the Prince show a little true grit as he grows older.   The white wheat flour represents his royal father.   At one time, white flour was used in bread that was only bound for royals.   By all accounts, Will is the real deal.  The sprouts are, of course, for the Young Royal Sprout himself.

 

 This recipe was loosely adopted from a Tzitzel recipe that Varda was working on.  For all we know, if the Windsor Royal Family had kept their German names and married  some Jewish Royalty like I did somewhere along the way, this young one might well have been name Prince Tzitzel .  His nickname could have been Tizzy!

 

Breakfast on bake day.

If he had a sister, she could have been named Elizabeth for her grandmother; the Queen, and Lizzy for short.  Oh…… what could have been!  Sadly, we won’t be seeing Tizzy and Lizzy in the royal family tree any time soon.

 

A nice salad for dinner.

We started the rye sprouts 2 days before they were needed.  The rye sour levain was a 3 stage process of 3 hours each for the first 2 stages.   When the levain had risen 25% after the 3rd feeding we refrigerated it for 48 hours.  We pulled it out of the fridge to warm up and to finish doubling.

Bake day lunch

The flours were all home milled in the Krup’s coffee mill - the perfect size for the little guy and The Prince deserves the best flour we can manage from a small coffee mill.  We used a 75% extraction again for the rye and the whole wheat but cut down the hydration from 91% last time to 85% this time.  It was a much stiffer dough but Tzitizel supposedly is a less hydrated kind of rye than the normal.

 

Saturdays breakfast - the fuel to slice the Prince's Chacon

When we pulled the levain out of the fridge we also started the autolyse by mixing the stout into the flours which included everything except the levain, salt and sprouts.  We sprinkled the salt over the autolyse ball so that we wouldn’t forget it but it wouldn’t interfere with the autolyse very much.

 

After 3 hours later we mixed the autolyse with the levain and did 10 minutes of slap and folds to get the gluten developed.  We then let the dough rest for 15 minutes before doing (3) sets of S&F’s on 20minute intervals where we incorporated the sprouts on the first one.  One set consisted of 4 stretches from the cardinal direction points and 4 folds - that’s it.

 

After a 30 minute rest on the counter the chacon was shaped in the bottom of the basket after dusting it with corn meal ala Tzitzel.  The design used was one meant to resemble Franko’s flower that he posted earlier this week.  We started with a ball in the middle and then did 4 tapered petals radiating out from it and added 4 smaller balls to fill in between the petals at the base.

 

The reminder of the dough was air shaped into a huge bialy and laid on top of the design on the bottom of the basket.  Can’t wait to see what this design will look like after baking.  After 30 minutes on the counter in a used plastic bag, into the fridge it went for a 16 hour retard.

 

If it rises to 85% overnight in the cold we will bake it cold right out of the fridge.  If not, we will let it warm up and finish proofing on the counter before loading it into the mini oven, a perfect oven for the little tot.  We used 2 of Sylvia’s steaming cups as usual for steam and we preheated to 500 F

 

In this case the bread needed a little more time to proof on the counter before hitting the oven with a splash of water going onto the bottom of the oven for a burst of additional steam.  After 2 minutes we turned the temperature down to 450 F and continued the steam for a total of 15 minutes.

 

The steam was then removed and the temperature was turned down to 425 F, convection this time.  We rotated the bread 180 degrees every 5 minutes until the bread reached 205 f on the inside when it was removed to a cooling rack.

The chacon cracked and bloomed unevenly but nicely and almost where we expected.  The bread browned well and we baked it boldly. The corn meal made for a different crust effect too.  Have to wait for the crumb shots but with the rise and lower hydration, we would expect the crumb to be a little less open than our normal for a rye bread like this one using fresh ground flours.

How did that Chinese 5 spice pork get in there?

The crumb came out like we expected and not quite as open a we wanted but it was soft and moist.  It is the best deli rye style of bread we have managed to date.  Very tasty indeed.  Next time we will up the hydration back to the 90% level to open the crumb some more,. When we take away the beer, sprouts and cornmeal and add in so caraway we think it will be very close to the Tzitzel we remember, only better. because of the home ground 75% extraction flour that just can't be bought anywhere.  This is the way bread is supposed to taste - killer with smoked meats as we will soon find out.

Time to relax with a prickly pear margarita

 

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

10

0

0

10

2.03%

75% Extraction Rye

15

25

35

75

15.24%

Water

15

25

35

75

15.24%

Total

40

50

70

160

32.52%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rye Sour Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

80

16.26%

 

 

 

Water

80

16.26%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

15.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

75% Extraction Rye

118

23.98%

 

 

 

Corn Meal

20

4.07%

 

 

 

75% Extraction Wheat

274

55.69%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

412

83.74%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

2.03%

 

 

 

Imperial Stout

360

73.17%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

87.38%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

492

100.00%

 

 

 

Total Stout 360, Water 80

440

89.43%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

89.43%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

20.33%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

85.11%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,067

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

5

1.02%

 

 

 

White Malt

5

1.02%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

15

3.05%

 

 

 

Total

25

5.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Rye Berries

100

20.33%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The spout weight is the dry weight before sprouting.

 

 

 

 

Comments

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Nice and dark and amazing crust man.  I bet this one will be super hearty.  C'mon, teasing us with those sunsets is one thing but no crumb shot is going too far!

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I am letting it rest for 20-24 hour or so to redistribute the moisture properly.  Who knows i might cut it for dinner though.  I like these celebration themed bakes and this one was fun.  It also got me a long way toward  my Tzitzel quest if you overlook; the corn meal in the bread, the stout, and the sprouts - which would not be in Tzitizel.   Varda got me pretty close I think.

This should be a stouter Jewish Deli rye than the normal - at least we hope it is.

Glad you liked the post John  Crumb shots will be appearing!

varda's picture
varda

tizzy after reading your post!   So much history.   So many add ins.   Tizzy and Lizzy.   Oh my!   Looks delicious!   I never pegged you for a royalphile, but I'm used to being surprised.   Now what happened to the human Chacon?   -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

bread Varda.  Next time i will drop the;  beer, corn on the inside and the sprouts and go for a real Tzitzel.  Thanks for your help in that regard,  When you home mill you have to put in the malts I'm thinking so that the bread proteins are broken down in great abundance for the yeast and Labs to feast on without running short for the browning of the crust.

As for Thomas Chacon, one day he got out of line with another TFL'er or two or three and he removed himself from the site.  I guess he just peddled his bike off into the Colorado mountains not to hear or seen again.

Happy Baking Varda - I think a chacon shape for one of your fine breads, would be one of your best sellers just because of the looks.  They would just fly out of your display case like the rest of your offerings,  

isand66's picture
isand66

Nothing like a history lesson with a nice dark flavorful piece of bread!  Great post DA and fantastic creation. Can't wait to see your crumb shot.

I was off fishing last night on a party boat for the first time.  Caught about 5-6 fluke, but alas my poor kittens will have to go without fresh fish since they were too small to keep.  Have to be over 19" now..used to be like 14" when I was a kid.

Anyway, great baking.  I hope your Lucy becomes great friends with my new family member, Max..

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

needs all the help Lucy can give him being outnumbered 5 to 1.  This is a really good Deli Rye that would go great with some pastrami or corned beef - or an accompaniment to some pate or chopped liver.  We like it a lot.  i love fish but do it as much as I used to.  Used to to do rock fish and striped bass out your way.  Never fished for fluke.  Fluke Fishing sounds pretty funky :-)

This bake was my take on LauraT's Weekly Challenge Bake of 'Congrats to Will and Katie.'  Hope others will join in the fun.

Happy baking Ian

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

The crumb turned out great man.  And hey, you finally honored me with a prickly pear margarita!  That one has to be for me right? :)

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

on the counter for you but when you didn't show up Lucy dibbed it.  I think the crumb wasn't as good as it could have been,  Next time, more water to 90% hydration and it might have been a little under proofed.  It didn't effect the taste any.  A nice deli rye, it is in every way.Plus it has a little chew.

So your movie bread didn't work out in the fridge like ti should have?   Very odd.  Usually you should be able to put an autolyse in the fridge for a few hours even if it has some SD in it.  I have refrigerated SD for 32 hours in the fridge.no problem..

Glad you liked the bread and I look forward to you next post ...Lucy looks forward to you not showing up for you next margarita too:-) . 

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Wasn't expecting a brief history lesson from you, Dab, but enjoyable nonetheless. :)

The Chacon looks flavourful and substantial. The fruits and veggies also appetizing. If you don't mind me asking, do you visit a local produce market often? Or do you have an extensive garden?

Zita

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and am glad to see you back too.  We like these challenge bakes.  I do have a lettuce garden and grow some tomatoes in the winter months October through May and we have  orange and minneola trees. 

I go to Sprouts and Food City every Wednesday, Lee Lee's on Thursday, Fry's (Kroger) and Safeway on Friday. The Mekong Market, Winco, Basha' s, Whole Foods and Pro's Ranch Market are farther away so i only stop in there when I'm doing something else nearby or I need something only they carrry.

In the Phoenix area, when you are retired, you can shop for fruits and veg every day.  The competition of the grocery chains is the fiersest in the country so we also enjoy the least expensive food too.  Much of the winter veg in the country is grown in AZ too so what I don't grow I can get easily.

We are also close to CA  and what AZ doesn't grow they do in CA which means their produce, while more expensive, the freight isn't too bad so we enjoy their bounty at a low cost too.  Have to take advantage of the fresh fruits and veg when you can becsue the local seans are so short.

Glad to see you back Zita  and I look forward to your next post.

Happy baking

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Wow, you have a lot options to fetch your fruits and veggies. Bet they're luscious, too! Here in Cambodia we're limited to a few selection of produce, but yields are low. Much of them imported from Thailand and Vietnam, which isn't good for the local economy. 

I plan to grow my own garden soon. Practically no experience so my mother will be lending a hand---more accurately, green thumbs!

Happy baking, Dab. Keep them breads coming. :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

veggies Zita.  A great choice.  In Cambodia I'm guessing anything will grow with fertilizer  - it's a jungle!  You are so lucky that you mom is there to teach you too!  What great times  and tastes you will have!

Happy gardening!

Mebake's picture
Mebake

A chacon fit for kings, and Princes, DA! This is one lovely bake! healthy, tasty and wholesome. It looks like your Krups mill is doing its job perfectly.

I'm envious of your rye sprouts!

-Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the future King of England is born and he deserves a special bread bake!  Congrats to Will and Katie too.  This one turned out fairly special, without too many goofy ingredients.  Very tasty and you are right, nutritious and healthy as well. 

Your sprouting saga has me completely stumped and baffled.  

Glad you liked the bread Khalid and happy baking