The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Any tips for photographing breads?

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Laura T.'s picture
Laura T.

Any tips for photographing breads?

I'd like my blog to look more polished but don't know how to improve my photos. I'm working with a basic digital camera at the moment because my DSLR is broken :(

ANy tips would be much appreciated.

yy's picture
yy

Lovely blog! I like the clean layout, and I also like how you include shots of both the crust and crumb. I'm no photography expert, but to my eye, a few of the photos look underexposed and motion-blurred. For instance, in the top photo of the gluten free baguettes, it looks like you were dealing with some low lighting conditions, It looks like the ISO setting is quite high, judging from the graininess. Investing in a tripod with a tilting head will help you take steadier longer-exposure shots at low enough ISOs to keep the noise at bay while maintaining the right level of brightness under low natural light conditions.

ITakeRandomPhotos's picture
ITakeRandomPhotos

Adjust your ISO and look into a tripod. If you're using a Point-and-Shoot camera, id set it to a night setting, or sports setting. Those should improve your shots at least a small amount. Also, try to shoot from an angle that would mimic a person sitting at a table looking towards the foods, and avoid the looking down effect. Makes for more flattering photos :)

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Hi Laura,

Your blog looks really nice. Getting your slr fixed will help ... Depending on what lens you have, you will have a lot more control over depth of field.

As the previous commenters have suggested, lighting will make the biggest difference. Try and find a space near a window and use morning or afternoon light. Watch how the light direction can increase the contrast in the crumb photos ... Experiment with this. 

Are you using some kind of photo editing software?

i like to use a combination of close up and distance shots. The distance pics I find are always a bit more difficult to setup and make intersting.

Take lots and lots of photos ...

cheers

Phil

JoeV's picture
JoeV

Get down where the bread is with your shot. Overhead shots leave much to be desired...literally. Here's a couple shots.

 

Natural lighting also seems to help a lot. Low sun angles (Winter) also help.

 

Good luck! Oh...most of these shots were taken with my iPhone or a cheap 8 mp Panasonic digital camera. Nothing fancy.