The Fresh Loaf

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Tang-Zhong Whole Wheat Multigrain

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Mebake's picture
Mebake

Tang-Zhong Whole Wheat Multigrain

I have been baking regularly on weekends, but haven’t had the chance to post a blog. Lately, my parents, whom I bake mostly for have complained that the crusts of my breads were too chewy, and demanded a softer version of my hearth multigrain bread. Butter, and/or enrichments came to mind instantly as these soften the crust and crumb, in addition to the usage of a bread pan instead of baking on hearth which also contributes to bread softness. However, recalling Floyd’s wonderful soft bread using Tang Zhong, I immediately knew that a Tang Zhong (aka: water roux) will bring much softness and tenderness to my multigrain breads without increasing the fat content.

Guided by Floyd’ recipe, I limited my Tang Zhong to 5% of total flour weight. It was made with 45 grams of White bread flour, and 225 grams of water. After all ingredients were mixed, the dough was unmanageably wet and would not form coherent dough. I was worried about the effects that Tang Zhong’s might have on my recipe, but I persisted and added slightly more flour. The dough began to come together and was finally manageable, although still wet.

After 2 hours worth of initial bulk fermentation, and two stretches and folds, the dough was retarded for an hour, to allow my poolish baguettes to be baked first:

 

Shaped and molded, final proofing took 3-3.5 hours, and was then was baked at 420F for 15 minutes (no steam), and 400F for 20 minutes.

The bread was allowed to cool for 2 hours, after which it was sliced and wrapped. The bread is incredibly soft, tender, moist, and full of grain/seed goodness! Next bake, I’ll reduce the hydration to a reasonable level.

- Khalid

Comments

evonlim's picture
evonlim

beautiful crumb from the loaf. what grains did you have in this? i see millet...

6  baguettes, wow did you baked them all at once? they are excellent.

evon

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks!

Yes, i've used millet, flaxseeds, sunflower seeds, and barley.

Scaled at 250 grams each, the baguettes were baked on two stones at once. 6 baguettes are the maximum capacity my oven can handle.

-Khalid

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Very nice Khalid.  Looks picture perfect.  Or, perfect in the picture!

Looks like it will make some amazing sandwiches for sure.  Perhaps a picnic in your near future? :)

John

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, John

No Picnics nowadays, Ramdan and all, but the breads are resting now in my freezer for occasional sandwiches.

-Khalid

isand66's picture
isand66

Looks like you ended up with a nice soft and tasty bread just like Mama ordered :).

I Ike the looks if those baguettes as well. Nice shaping and scoring for sure.  How did your crumb and taste come out?

Regards

Ian

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks Ian!

The Tang Zhong made all the difference! Mama had approved it :)

The baguettes had an open crumb and a nutty poolish sweet fragrance, and flavor. The crumb wasn't a honeycomb like Txfarmer's but it was decent enough for me.

-Khalid

 

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Khalid,

Your baguettes are beautiful.  Love the crust color - the variance in the colors where you scored the loaves - really pretty.

I have been experimenting with HL in my 100% whole grains spurred on by Phil's last post with 100% HL but my quest did begin when Floyd posted his tang-zong loaf too.  Sent me back to Syd's Asian Style Pan de Mie which is a very soft loaf but takes 3 days to complete and is high in enrichments....That led me to a custard loaf which uses a bit less fat but it is still there and only takes overnight to complete.  

Like you, I don't like to add a lot of fat or sweetner to my loaves so upping the hydration has allowed me to get soft without the fat and I have been able to do it without a tang-zhong so there is a bit less work.  Trick to an easier to handle dough though is an overnight bulk retardation time in the refrig.  Dough is sticky in the morning but not as sticky as when it has just been mixed.  The loaf pan holds it shape like yours did.  

Today I am baking an oatmeal date loaf with sesame seeds - inspired by you :) and the HL is 110%!  That high though due to the oatmeal that does absorb quite a bit of water.  The dough was pretty slack this morning but I was able to shape rolls and a loaf with it with much of a sticking problem.  I am imagining they will be very soft.

Your loaf looks really soft in the photo expecially with all the grains you added.  Crust looks nice too.  (Another thing I have been experimenting with is higher baking temps.  [also inspired by Phil] and I am getting thinner crusts as a result.) I am glad your parents were pleased.  Like you I face the fun challenge of baking for a variety of tastes in my family.  Always keeps me guessing and then, just when I think I have gotten it right, it all changes again :- O

Thanks so much for sharing your latest bakes - and all of your past ones too :)

Take Care,

Janet

 

 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, Janet

There are many ways to achieving a soft crumb, and i wanted to try Tang Zhong. Moreover, WW multigrain by Hamelman is a favorite here, and making it with a Tang Zhong was a natural choice. I like your overnight bulk retardation method, but i'm too tired and busy by the end of the week to mix any dough.

I'm watching out for your oats-date bread, it sounds like a winning combination.

Thanks alot for the kind words, Janet.

-khalid

I

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

I understand about tired :- )  Much nicer to bake when the energy is there.

I just took the photos of the date/oatmeal loaf and will post here rather than on your other blog.  The sesame seeds really looked pretty after the bake.  I was worried they would all blow off in my little convection oven but that didn't happen.  My daughter said it tasted great so I will do it again sometime.  Crumb was nice and moist but firmer than a 'normal' sandwich loaf which I think is due to the dates and the oatmeal which is added as dry flakes.

Thanks for this inspiration for this loaf!

Take Care,

Janet

Mebake's picture
Mebake

What a perfect shape, and texture! The color is so attractive. Janet, beautiful one! Now you inspired me :)

How was the flavor?

-Khalid

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

You are so kind :)

My daughter said it tasted very nice.  Not too sweet but the dates do add that nice sweetness and combined with the oats give it a firm but soft texture.  She liked the addition of the sesame seeds too so I will continue to add them and now I want to include them in other breads because I did like how they looked on this loaf.  I remember as a child really liking them on crusts of one of the breads my mother used to buy for us.  The crust was the first part of the bread I would always eat.  

My husband and son just comment one way on my breads anymore 'its good mom/Janet'.  No details from them unless it is something they don't like ; O

Again, thanks for your supportive words.  I really appreciate them!

Janet

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

loaf of Oat, Date and Sesame bread - just beautiful Janet.  You should post it on the recipe section of TFL for the rest of us to make!

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

 

I left you a note over on Paul's blog so I won't repeat myself here *^ }

Take Care,

Janet

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

bread Khalid - very healthy.  Looks very soft!  When i want softer crust,  I just baste it in NF milk when it comes out fo the oven :-) I would like to see your recipe for the WW bread too.  We are going to do another multigrain one this Friday at 100% hydration.and 100% whole grains - with a scad and ground sesame and  flax - probably.Thang Zhong would make it too wet i'm guessing.

The baguettes are beautiful too.

Happy Baking

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, DA!

Brushing the crust with milk is another way to a softer crust, i believe. I also believe that my initial low baking temperature has contributed to the softness of the crust. however, i'm still new to the Tang Zhong world, and i'll have to try it with a lower hydration dough next.

As to the recipe, i'll will pm it to you.

All the best,

-Khalid

bruneski's picture
bruneski

Hi, Khalid!

Great looking baguettes! Wonderfully looking Tang-Zhong Whole Wheat Multigrain!

Both mouthwatering!

Would you mind sharing the formula/method for the Tang-Zhong WW Multigrain, already including the adaptations you deemed necessary (like lower hydration)?

Thanks a lot. Have a great week! 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thank you, Bruneski

I will pm the recipe formula to you.

Best wishes,

-Khalid

bruneski's picture
bruneski

I'll be eagerly awaiting its arrival!

Have a great day!

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

You mention lowering the hydration to a reasonable level for the next bake.  Did you use more water in this bake than you normally do?  If so, was that because of additional water from the water roux?  You certainly seem to have compensated effectively, based on the outcome.

The baguettes are lovely, too.

Paul

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, Paul

Yes, the water roux brought additional moisture in addition to the sunflower seeds' not soaking the boiling water.

What i meant by lowering the hydration was adding more flour, that and using a grain instead of sunflower seeds.

Much appreciated,

-Khalid

annie the chef's picture
annie the chef

Hi Khalid

I've been trying on a few bakes with baguettes.  I guess I need to practice more often on baguettes in the future. Can you share your formulas for those loaves in the photos?

Thanks Khalid.

Annie

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hi, Annie

Sure, i'll pm you the formulas.

-Khalid

annie the chef's picture
annie the chef

Thanks Khalid.

Cheers,

Annie

varda's picture
varda

both the whole wheat and the baguettes.  -Varda

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thank you Varda :)

Lavanyashah's picture
Lavanyashah

Those are beautiful loaves.  Would you mind sharing your WW Tang Zhong recipe? 

I also wanted to let you know that your 80% Detmolder rye post inspired me to make my own, and I loved it.  Thank you.   Lavanya

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, Lavanya

I'll pm you the recipe. 

As to the 80% detmolder, have you posted your results on TFL? I'm glad you liked it :) 

-Khalid

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Great baking Khalid,

You really make some very interesting tinned loaves. Inspirational.

Cheers,
Phil

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I love to bake hearth breads, but my bread recipients (my parents) favor softer crusts. I want to try the recipe above as a free standing hearth bread, brush it with milk or butter when it comes out of the oven, and wrap it with a plastic bag to soften. 

thanks for the kind words, Phil!

Syd's picture
Syd

Hi Khalid,

Beautiful baguettes there!  You have some good ideas there for a softer crust, namely: "brush it with milk or butter when it comes out of the oven, and wrap it with a plastic bag to soften."  Add to that list:  bake at at a lower temperature or for a shorter time.

Hope all is well,

Syd 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, Syd :)

Well, not to that extent!  afterall ,hearth breads' appeal has alaways been in crust color and shape. Hmm.. I'll have try your suggestion, and see for myself.

Thanks,

-Khalid

Xiaobao12's picture
Xiaobao12

Hi Khalid,

Those breads are simply beautiful......would it be possible to get your receipes for the breads baked? Thanks so much.

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

I suppose you can convert any regular yeasted bread recipes using this method?  I understand that the ratio of water  to  flour is always  5:1 so if I  just take a small amt of flour, say 3 or 4 % instead of 5%  from the total amt of flour, and also taking into  consideration the total  amt of water used in the recipe (may need to add back a little  bit more water in the final dough) since a small percentage is lost due to evaporation when cooking  the  water roux.?

May I ask what is the percentage of your multigrains that  you used and the % of wholewheat to bread flour?  If the  dough is too wet, perhaps there is no need to soak the seeds overnite, or perhaps just for a couple  of hrs instead?  Thanks Khalid.

Judy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hi, Judy

Yes, that is about right. I don't think you'd need to add water to compensate for the evaporated water in the tangzhong, as it brings enough moisture to the dough and adding water will make it too wet.

The recipe's baker's percentage can be calculated from Txfarmer's post on the recipe here.

As to reducing the soaking time, that may impact the hardness of the grains and increase the wetness of the dough, as the soaker had no sufficient time to soak.

-Khalid

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

of did you use a levain for the WW multigrain loaf?  I saw Txfarmer 's recipe and she uses a levain.  I'm wondering if whether you used a levain plus part of  the final dough for  water roux?  Many thanks.

Judy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I used both, a levain and a tsp of instant yeast for the final dough. i did use part of the recipe water for the roux.

all the best!

paindemi's picture
paindemi

hi Mebake!

Yours loaf looks yummm!!!im also a new user of Tangzhong. mai i hv ur recipe of ingredients share pls??

merci beaucoup:-)

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Bonjour!

Thanks. I've sent you the recipe.

best wishes.

KBread's picture
KBread

This bread looks wonderful. Are you still sharing the recipe? I've been making a multi-grain whole wheat bread, but would like to improve on it. Your approach looks like it would be the perfect remedy. Thanks in advance.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hi, Kbread,

Thanks. I've sent you the recipe.

best wishes.

 Khalid

KBread's picture
KBread

Khalid,

Thank you! Both for the recipe and the very speedy reply.

Kathy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

:) you are welcome, Kathy!

MonkeyDaddy's picture
MonkeyDaddy

It's a testament to the popularity of your post that this thread has been running almost a year - congratulations on that and on your bread!!

I've been mostly a white-flour (occasionally rye, too) baker for many years, but my wife and I are trying to shift more of the processed ingredients out of our diet and I think your bread would definitely be a step in the right direction.  May I please have the recipe?

Thanks, 

    --Mike

 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

 Hi, Mike

Thanks for the nice words. I've sent you the recipe.

All the best,

 Khalid

MonkeyDaddy's picture
MonkeyDaddy

Thanks for the rapid response Khalid, I'll be getting the loaf in the oven soon.  :-)