The Fresh Loaf

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Multigrain Caramelized Pickled Veggies, Parmesan, Flax & Sesame Seeds, Barley Boil & Toadish Sourdough

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Multigrain Caramelized Pickled Veggies, Parmesan, Flax & Sesame Seeds, Barley Boil & Toadish Sourdough

We decide to use some left overs for this bake from the last bake of hot dog buns.  The left overs were the pickled onion, red pepper, tomato and poblano toppings that we added some kalamata olives too and then caramelized the whole mix to get rid of the moisture, add a roasted flavor and send this bred further down an Italian path.

 

Oddly, the sifted bran, that was fed to the starter to make the levain, started out much darker than the remainder of the sifted flour used to make the autolyse.  But when they finally came together, the levain on the left was much lighter in color than the autolyse.  Very strange!

To this 100% whole multi grain bake we added some barley to the usual whole grain mix of spelt, rye, wheat and farro.  Since we ground all the grains for this bread in the tiny Krup’s Coffee mill, we were able to sift out 22% from the rest of this fine flour and used it to feed the levain for this bake.

 

That way the bran and other bits were in the wet the longest at 36 hours to get them soft and less likely to cut any gluten strands.  Plus, they instantly make the bread 100% whole grain again and we made sure to get the hydration to over 100% this time too after our last 90% hydration bake.

 

We added a large boiled whole barley component, Toadies, ground flax and sesame seeds, red and white malts were added along with just enough VWG to make sure we got some rise out this gluten deficient grain combination.  To top it off we added some shredded parmesan making sure that the Italian base was confirmed.

 

We didn’t know if our fridge maintained, mixed grain, SD starter would like being fed the 22% sifted out portion of the grain so we increased the seed by 5 g to 15g for this bake.   The levain ended up being 15% of the total weight of the dough and it performed as usual.   We refrigerated it for 24 hours after the levain had risen about 25% after the 3rd feeding to increase the sour.

 

You can see the poke test and the cracking on the bottom of the loaf.  Time for the oven.

When we removed the levain from the fridge to finish it’s doubling after the cold, we started the 3 hour autolyse with everything except the levain, salt, seeds, caramelized pickle mix and boiled barley.

 

Once the levain hit the autolyse we mixed it briefly using a spoon for 30 seconds and immediately knew this dough was going to be a problem and way, way over hydrated.  The last dough was great at 90 % and 100% hydration would have been fine but this dough was different

 

It had less wheat flours with the addition of rye and barley.   These changes made the dough very sloppy.  We let the mix sit for 20 minutes after sprinkling the salt on top.  We then did our usual 10 minutes of slap and folds where the dough barely came together.

 

Our rule is, if 10 minutes of slap and folds don’t do the trick then we add more flour.  To keep it in the Italian range our flour of choice was some whole Desert Durum.    We used some to get the sticky dough off our fingers after 10 minutes.  We let the dough rest for 10 minutes and then did 5 more minutes of slap and folds using Desert Durum to get the dough off our fingers once again and allowed the dough to rest for 10 minutes again.   

 

We then did 3 stretch and folds 20 minutes apart to incorporate the boiled berries and seeds on the first one, the caramelized veggies and Parmesan on the 2nd one. It’s like bruschetta on the inside!  By the end of the 3rd one then add ins were thoroughly incorporated.  We then let it ferment for 20 minutes before retarding it for 16 hours in the fridge.

 

Breakfast and lunch on bake day

It rose well in the fridge if you consider 30% volume increase well and we let it rest for 30 minutes on the counter before shaping it into something you might find in Altamura if they do Fendu there.  The bread only had 4 g or durum in it but was still plenty Italian enough.

 

It was so slack it probably should have gone into a pan but we shaped it as a Snails with Tails chacon for the final proof with the fendu fold split in the middle in bottom of the basket between the snails.  The last bake was very weak when it came to snail splitting and we wanted to give it another go.

 

We let proof on the 84 F counter for 2 ½ hours and then we fired up the mini oven to 500F and got (2) of Sylvia’s steaming cup’s half full of water with dish rags inside going in the microwave.

 

We upended the basket using the vented top of the mini’s broiler pan for a peel that was covered in parchment.  The cups went on and that assembly went into the 500 F mini oven for 15 minutes of steam.  We turned the oven down to 475 F after 3 minutes.  We removed Sylvia’s steam at the 15 minute mark and continued to bake at 425 F, convection this time, for another 15 minutes until then middle read 205 F.  We rotated the bread every 5 minutes under convection to make sure it browned evenly.

 

It browned nicely and the crest was very crispy – almost crunchy.  Nothing seems to put a thick, crust on bread without burning like the mini oven with mega steam in place.  Didn’t notice any blisters though.  This one cracked at the Fendu Fold more than at the Snails but crack it did.  It smells powerful..   The crumb came out farly open for such a packed whoe grain bread.  It was moist and nvery soft.  It does taste like bruschetta on the inside instead of on the outside outside but the surprising thing is the spicy chipotle barley grains. What an unexpected pleasure.  Thus bread is healthy, spicy and great to munch on without toasting, butter or anything else required.  Just delicious.

The bread went well with a fine fritatta of homemade sweet Italian sausage, red bells, poblanos peppers, onion, grey Mexicaan squash adn mushrooms with Greek yogurt mixed in with the eggs and brie, Parmesan and smoky gouda for the cheeses.

Formula

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

15

0

0

15

4.91%

Whole Farro

2.5

4

5

10.5

3.44%

Whole Rye

2.5

4

4

10.5

3.44%

Whole Barley

5

8

10

23

7.53%

Whole Wheat

2.5

4

5

11.5

3.76%

Whole Spelt

2.5

4

5

10.5

3.44%

Water

15

24

29

66

21.60%

Total

45

48

58

147

48.12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Bran and Sifted Bits

74

24.06%

 

 

 

Water

74

24.06%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

14.64%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Barley

76

24.88%

 

 

 

WholeDesert Durum

4

1.31%

 

 

 

Mixed Whole Grains

152

49.75%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

232

75.94%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

6

1.96%

 

 

 

Water

268

87.73%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

115.52%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

306

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

341.5

111.78%

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

111.78%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds & Boil

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

White Malt

3

0.98%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

25

8.18%

 

 

 

Pickled Olive, Tomato, Onion & Poblano

60

19.64%

 

 

 

Toadies

15

4.91%

 

 

 

Red Malt

3

0.98%

 

 

 

Parmesan Cheese

50

16.37%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

15

4.91%

 

 

 

Total

171

55.97%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boil

 

%

 

 

 

Barley Berries

180

58.92%

 

 

 

Total Soaker

180

58.92%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight of barley berries and pickled veg is after cooking.  The barley berries were boiled in spicy Chipotle sauce.  

 

 

 

Comments

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

What an amazing spread, once again.  I am guessing some lucky local farm market in Gilbert cha-chings when you enter their doors.  There is a nice Mexican owned produce markettucked away in Mesa that we loved getting our groceries from.  Amazing stuff and so cheap.  Not to mention, latin goodies like dried chili's and spices you can't usually find at the major markets.  It blows my mind that the prices can be so affordable.  I still don't understand where all of it comes from since anywhere I looked around, was desert and cactus.  No orchards, groves, berry fields, etc.

I need to try some scalds soon...you remind me every time.

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

shock recently when Ranch Pro's Markets went into bankruptcy.  They competed with Food City for the Hispanic market and helped keep everyone's prices low.  Hopefully they will make it out of the financial troubles.  The local market that gets my bread making money is Whole Foods not the cheapest place around but I do get LaFama Flour from Mexico at Food City when it is on sale for 38 cents a pound - not bad for 13.3 % protein flour.  I usually buy what ever is on sale where ever it is on sale.  I figure that if you buy stuff when it is not on sale they won't ever have a reason to put it on sale .  This week's deals are the large tropical mangos 4 for a $1, whole chickens  88 cents a pound and roma tomatoes 25 cents a pound and only the tomatoes found their way into this bread :-)

This scald had chipotle int he water so the berries were very tasty.  You will like scalds once you try them.

Happy baking John,

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

I was speaking more about the produce spreads you always post with your bread.  I figured it was either a lucky produce market that gets your business, or, you ARE the produce market!

Scalds scare me.  Sprouted grains even more so. 

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

with the rib lurking in the back, the food on that plate came from 7 different places - not counting the lettuce and tomato from the back yard.  Nothing like being retired and worst thing you have do every day is clean the pool and shop for fresh food in 2 or 3 different places :-) 

The scald for this bread would scare anyone.  No sense having bland barley in your bread!  This one was 1/2 C of barley simmered covered in 2 C of water with 2 Knoor Chipotle seasoning cubes for 40 minutes.   Then remove the cover and continue to simmer stirring all the time until the liquid is gone about 12 more minutes.  One cube is supposedly equal to 1 chipotle chili so we used 2  as we love chipotle around here like it was an apprentice :-) Happy Scalding John.

 

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

I love chipotle as well.  Get the canned import chipotle then place whatever I don't use in a bag and freeze.  Lasts all cold winter long for that heat I crave.  I've never seen the Knorr chipotle cubes till now.  I am a bit of a boullion cube junkie.  If it was socially (or medically) acceptable, I would suck on them like candy. 

As a scald expert, maybe you can help.  I am going to bake a swedish seed rye but want to replace the barley that the recipe calls in the soaker, to scalded wheat berries.  I have boiled the berries, drained and patted dry on papertowel.  Now they are sitting on a sheet in the fridge to further dry out.  Even with all this drying after boiling, would you adjust the amount of water in a recipe for any water that may have been soaked up into the berries?

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

as wet as they are until right before i use them.  Then i sieve them and dump them out on paper towels and I blot them dry with more paper towels. As long as there is no extra water on the outside of the berries, you don't have to adjust any liquids in the recipe,  If the the recipe calls for 72 % hydration that is what i go with and ignore the water sucked up by the scald - whatever that was - I couldn't care less.....and neither does it i'm guessing,

Sucking on boullion cubes is a fine phobia if you ask me...wonder what it is called?  I'm beginning to think TFL needs a resident psychiatrist though :-)

Scalded berries are nothing more than a gateway drug to sprouts and malts:-)

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

As a note, I boiled 213g dry wheat berries.  I weighed them now after boiling and drying, and they weigh 355g.  That is a lot of water retained in them.  I will take your advice and use them as is, without adjusting hydration in the original formula. 

Consider me officially an addicted scald junkie.  I need my fix bad.

Thanks for the help, master scalder :)

John

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

scald that I used in my bread which was was roughly around 1,000 g.  You have enough scald for 2 nice sized loaves.  Yes,  sprouts are in your future.  Like all bread sepecially ones with scalds, make sure you bake to 205 F and let it completely cool before slicing.  You will have a hard time going back to wanting less is more bread John:-)

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

It's almost as if you read my formula.  It is for 2 loaves and it calls for 205F internal temp.  Damn you're good.

John

isand66's picture
isand66

Wow-another great bake DA.  You are certainly brave to attempt a free-form loaf with such a high hydration dough.  Beauty of a sunset and nice tasty looking spread.

So how did it taste?

Happy Baking

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

hydration was much etter than the last one at 90%,  This one had rye and barley in it and less ww, spelt and farro so I suspect that it was mainly the rye but the barley too that cause the dough to be sloppy.  Took a lot more slap and folds to get it to come together.  This one sprang more in the oven but did not have as open a crumb because of all the goodies packed inside. The caramelized vinegar bruschetta mix really sets the taste for the bread. It does taste like bruschetta and thankfully I love the stuff!

I proofed it in a basket so it wasn,t free form.  It would have been too much of a thrill to hand shape it on parchment and watch it spread out for 3 hours as it proffedm but that would begoing a bread too far for a thrill.:-)

Don't worry.  You will find easy Internet service in Costa Rica at your hotel or Condo.to stay in touch with Fresh Lofians sweating it out without a beach or sea breezes:-)

Glad you like the bread Ian and Happy baking

evonlim's picture
evonlim

A full meal in a slice of this bread!!! as you said chewing on a slice without adding on anything is already marvelous. i believe you!! it would be my favorite too. you have been stretching your formula in a wider scope beyond my imagination, very inspiring. is that an omelette ?? egg is my favorite too.. especially 5 eggs omelette. stone fruits and berries are in season now. peaches are beautiful.. 

lovely as always

evon

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

healthy too :-)  I've eaten a quarter of the loaf and not one piece has and anything on it.  Even the fritatta wasn't allowed on a slice!  Fritatta's are like an oven baked omelette.  In this case; the sausage, onion, poblano, squash, red pepper and mushroom went into the pan first with some bacon fat to help the flavors along,  Once the meat was brown and the onions soft then I whipped 2 T of Greek Yogurt and 2 T of milk with 2 T of grated parmesan into 4 eggs and poured it over the veggie saute just smooshing it around until it covered the bottom, then we grated some smokey gouda over the top and laid brie slices on top of that.  Then into the 350 F mini oven for about 10 minutes until the top has not browned at all but the bottom has like this.  Glad you liked the bread Evon.  It was nice to get back to more interesting ingredients in bread for a change :-)

 

 

isand66's picture
isand66

That frittata looks amazing and must have tasted perfect!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

service for 3 looked like.  i got the extra piece of bread!  You forget how good foods are when you don't have them very often like this fritatta.  Just delicious and the bread was tasty enough too.  Enjoy Costa Rica Ian.  Here is what the whole plate looked like before it disappeared in a instant.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Amazing mix of colors and food varieties! You bring a whole new meaning to the word "pumpernickel". This is a meal in intself, and your dog must be in heaven!

Lovely and inspiring, as usual DA!

-Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

With the great fruits and veggies we are getting in AZ right now it is pretty easy to make a variety plate of colors and tastes.  You have to take advantage of the earth's bounty while it lasts.  You would like this bread Khalid - very healthy too!.

Next bake we are going back to a more basic loaf of 100% whole wheat kind of grains using, spelt, ww and farro  - with 100% hydration instead of 90% like we did the last time we baked those grains together a couple of weeks ago.

Do you know why the darker 22% sifted out bran and other bits that were used to feed the levin turned out so much lighter in color after 36 hours in the levain than the autolyse when they came together to make the dough?  I have not noticed this before.

Then it will be Tzitzel time.  Can't wait to see your next post.

Happy baking Khalid.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

That is odd, indeed. I think that the sifted bran you thought you had is in fact middlings (corase endosperm) and some bran. The middlings would plump up, and the little bran left would be bleached out.

-Khalid