The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Identifying the special flavor of a brand name bread

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Joanie's picture
Joanie

Identifying the special flavor of a brand name bread

I'm new to baking bread with a machine and am having a ton of fun with my Panasonic. One of the reasons I decided to give all of this a whirl is that I love Pepperidge Farm Original White Bread but want to have breads which have no preservativers, chemicals, etc. Only a couple of times in my life have I had bread which had that special taste of this brand and no one has been able to identify what ingredient or method gives it this taste. My mother, a great bread maker for awhile, produced a couple of loaves with this flavor but she had no idea what she did or did not do to produce it. Is there anyone out there who might have some ideas? I've checked all over the web to no avail and the bread books I've read did not help either. A million thanks if anyone can help me out.

Antilope's picture
Antilope

I know this is a 5 year old thread, but I'm posting this info for the record, in case someone is interested in the information.

From the Google newspaper archive: http://news.google.com/newspapers

In the 1965 Sarasota Herald Tribune newspaper a Pepperidge Farm ad lists the ingredients for their White Enriched Bread made then:

Pepperidge Farm White Enriched Bread
Net Weight 1 LB.

"Unbleached flour, fresh whole milk,
vegetable shortening, table salt, fresh yeast,
highest quality grade AA sweet creamery butter and water.
Sweetened with cane syrup and honey only."

 

Meriden Record newspaper - Jul 28, 1960

Pepperidge Farm Oatmeal Bread
Thin Sliced 1 lb

"Made from unbleached white flour,
oatmeal, sugar, highest quality 93 score sweet creamery
butter, honey, yeast, table salt and water."

 

The Pittsburgh Press - Feb 8, 1961

Pepperidge Farm Raisin Bread with Cinnamon
Thin Sliced

A new swirling process, perfected by Pepperidge Farms,
swirls the finest imported cinnamon geneously through every slice.

"Made from unbleached white flour, raisins, fresh whole milk, cane syrup, fresh yeast, egg yolks, vegetable shortening, 93 score sweet cream butter, table salt, honey, cinnamon and water."

Antilope's picture
Antilope

Copycat of the original hand kneaded Pepperidge Farm Stone Ground Whole Wheat Bread from 1937.

In 1937, Margaret Rudkin founded the Pepperidge Farm bakery in Fairfield, Connecticut. Her family lived on property called Pepperidge Farm, named for an ancient Pepperidge tree that grew there. One of her young sons suffered from severe allergies and asthma. On the advice of their doctor, as a treatment, he was put on a diet of fruits and vegetables and minimally processed foods. Margaret decided to try baking him some all-natural whole wheat bread as part of the diet. She used only wholesome ingredients like stone-ground whole wheat, fresh butter, whole milk and honey in the bread.

Her recipe turned out to be so successful, friends and family kept asking for it. She sold some to a local grocer. Even though her bread cost three times as much as most breads, orders poured in and she started a local bakery. She hired local women to work in the bakery and the bread was kneaded and prepared only by hand. In 1950, when the Pepperidge Farm Bakery expanded into Pennsylvania, bread was still hand kneaded at the new bakery. The bakery business expanded across America through the 1940's and 1950's making her a millionaire. She sold the Pepperidge Farm Bakery to Campbell's Company in 1961.

Peppridge Farm Whole Wheat Bread Copycat from 1937 

Makes Two 1-1/2 LB loaves.

2 cups (490 g) Whole Milk, divided use
4 1/2 tsp (14 g) Active Dry Yeast (or 2 packets)
2 tsp (12 g) Table Salt
2 Tbsp (30 g) Butter
1/2 cup (170 g) Clover Honey
1/4 cup (30 g) Wheat Germ
6 cups (720 g) Stone Ground Whole Wheat Flour

1. Heat 1/2 cup milk until lukewarm. Dissolve yeast in milk. Let stand 10 minutes.

2. Scald remaining milk, pour over salt and butter in large mixing bowl. Cool to lukewarm, add honey, dissolved yeast, and wheat germ. Add whole wheat flour beating vigorously with wooden spoon until dough forms a ball.

3. Turn out on a well-floured board. Knead vigorously until dough is elastic and bubbles form. Place dough in a lightly greased bowl. Cover, set in a warm place until doubled in bulk.

4. Place dough on floured board. Divide in two parts shaping loaves to fit 5-inch by 9-1/2-inch loaf pans. Greaseloaf pans well with unsalted shortening. Cover, let loaves rise in pans until almost doubled in bulk (about 1 hour) in a warm place.

5. Bake in preheated 400-degree F oven 15-minutes or until loaves begin to brown. Reduce oven to 350-degrees F and bake about 40-45 minutes longer or until bread is done.

cranbo's picture
cranbo

Thanks for the research Antilope. Sounds like nothing special in the white bread. Could just be butter and honey that are adding the mystery flavor?

Joanie, can you describe the flavor? I wonder if what you are describing as flavor is the result of a sponge or extended fermentation of some sort. 

Antilope's picture
Antilope

Copycat of the original hand kneaded Pepperidge Farm White Bread from 1950.

Pepperidge Farm White Bread Copycat from 1950

Makes Two 1-1/2 LB loaves.

1-1/2 cups (365 g) Whole Milk, divided use
4-1/2 tsp (14 g) Active Dry Yeast
2 tsp (12 g) Table Salt
4 Tbsp (55 g) Butter
2 Tbsp (25 g) Vegetable Shortening
3/4 cup (180 g) Warm Water
4 Tbsp (65 g) Honey
2 Tbsp (20 g) Cane Sugar Syrup
6 cups (820 g) Unbleached Bread Flour

1. Heat 1/2 cup milk until lukewarm. Dissolve yeast in milk. Let stand 10 minutes.

2. Scald remaining 1 cup of milk, pour over salt, butter and shortening in large mixing bowl. Add warm water and allow mixture to cool to lukewarm. Add honey, cane sugar syrup and dissolved yeast. Add flour, beating vigorously with wooden spoon, until dough forms a ball.

3. Turn out on a well-floured board. Knead vigorously until dough is elastic. Place dough in a lightly greased bowl. Cover, set in a warm place until doubled in bulk.

4. Place dough on floured board. Divide in two parts shaping loaves to fit 5-inch by 9-1/2-inch loaf pans. Grease loaf pans well with unsalted shortening. Cover, let loaves rise in pans until almost doubled in bulk (about 1 hour) in a warm place.

5. Bake in preheated 400-degree F oven about 30-40 minutes or until bread is well browned and done.