The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

New Poster -and a Question

  • Pin It
SOSP's picture
SOSP

New Poster -and a Question

Howdy - I've been reading the forums for a few month and decided to take a dip in participation.  I enjoy making sourdoughs and baguettes.  Anyway my question...

 

Where does someone find a mill with fresh Flour?  In the books I've studied they say fresh milled flour is the best, well I can't seem to figure out where to find these guys to try it out.  I live in the Midwest about an hour and a half east of Chicago.

Any help would be great.

gnglueck's picture
gnglueck

I would think you'd need to get it shipped to you as I don't know of a local milller in your area. I get all my flour milled weekly from a place right down the road from me and I know that they ship all over the country. Fresh ground flour is considered fresh for up to 2 weeks. And stores great in the freezer. There phone number is 254-754-9665 if you'd like to give them a ring. Also here is their web address www.homesteadgristmill.com   They are located in Waco Texas and their flour is fabulous.I use their sifted flours which only have the large pieces of bran sifted out. It is wonderful flour! I've been using it in my bakery for the past 5 years. Give them a try and let me know what you think!

SOSP's picture
SOSP

I'll check them out and let you know what I think.  Is there anything different about baking with fresh milled flour?  Should my does be more hydrated, less hyrdrated, or am I over thinking it?

gnglueck's picture
gnglueck

Baking with whole wheat flour is a whole different ball game. It is not dificult! You will need to adjust several aspects of your baking. You definatley will need to up your hydration. Your bread will have a lot more flavor but you will have to work harder for structure. I use whole wheat freshly ground flours for everything including the building of my sourdough starters and such so I've learned to work with it. My favorite flour, the one I have the most success with is the Sifted White from Homestead Gristmill. All my sourdoughs are made out of that flour. It is not a "white" like processed "white" it is the variety of wheat. The company that I've mentioned sifts the large pieces of bran out. It makes a light colored loaf (for whole wheat) and it's a hard spring wheat which gives you a good amount of protien. I love it! I've baked with whole grains for about 10 years now and love them and wouldn't use anything else that's what our whole bakery is based on, So for me to tell you all the differences I don't know if I can...I could send you some formulas if you'd like. Let me know!

Best of Luck & Happy Baking!

Grace

SOSP's picture
SOSP

"...work harder for structure."  - Is this mean it will take more time to develop the stucture with more folds or something completely different?

My normal recipe for sourdough is 70% hydrated, 20% levain, and I use a 7:3 ratio of unbleached white to wheat ratio.  What do you suggest for a starting off point with fresh milled flour?

Thanks for all the help.  I can't wait to get after it in a weak or two when I'm back in my kitchen for a weekend.

Adam 

 

gnglueck's picture
gnglueck

What I mean by "working harder for structure" is that you have to learn to deal with whole grains differently for example...shaping a 100% whole wheat sourdough loaf you have to use a gentler hand, it takes more patience for rising periods because it just takes longer. I think the only thing to do is try, try and keep trying till you get it. My sourdough recipe is pretty simple. I keep my sourdough going at all times because I use it daily at my bakery so this is basicly my recipe. I'm going to give it to you in cup measurements I hope you don't mind...

 

3 cups spring water at room temp (72-80 degrees F)

2 cups sourdough starter

1 1/2 tablespoons salt

5-8 cups whole wheat flour preferbly a whole white wheat that has some bran removed.

Combine water, starter and salt in a bowl.

Stir to break up the starter.

Add flour 1 cup at a time to make sure you don't put to much flour in.... putting too much flour in your dough is a very common mistake. You want your dough to be sticky especially with whole grains because they keep absorbing moisture as they rise due to the fiber.

Knead by hand for about 10 minutes. If your using a Kitchen Aid or something like that I usually mix it with the dough hook on low for 3 minutes then on medium for 4 minutes.

Let the dough set out on the counter for about 30 minutes covered with plastic wrap.

Knead into a tight ball in place in the fridge for 18 hours.

Remove dough from fridge divide into loaves and let sit on counter until most of the chill is off and the dough is pliable again.

Shape into loaves let proof in proofing baskets until nearly doubled

About 30 minutes before the dough is ready to go in the oven preheat it to 500 with a baking stone in it.

Bake like you would a hearth loaf in an oven with a stone and steam. I either mist the oven with a spray bottle or put a pan on the bottom of the oven while the oven preheats then splash a few tablespoons of water at a time into the bottom of the hot pan to steam the oven. I usually turn down the temp after the first 10 minutes of baking to 425

Bake until internal temp reaches 205-210.

Let cool and enjoy!

I hope this helps let me know if you have any questions....

Good Luck and Happy Baking!

Grace