The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Converting confectioner's sugar to cornstarch + granulated sugar in a recipe

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jvlin's picture
jvlin

Converting confectioner's sugar to cornstarch + granulated sugar in a recipe

Hi!

I would like to convert confectioner's sugar to (granulated sugar + cornstarch) in a recipe I'm using. Is there a good way to do this? Will it affect the rise of my yeast or the consistency of my bread at all?

Thank you!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

How is the granulated sugar and the cornstarch written up in the recipe?

What does the label say on the confectioner's sugar as far as ingredients are concerned?  

jvlin's picture
jvlin

I've thrown away the package for the confectioner's sugar, but I don't recall it saying what percentage was in it. The recipe calls for 50g of confectioner's sugar, and I want to turn that into sugar and starch. I was thinking maybe 45g sugar and 5g starch?

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

You can make confectioner's sugar in the food processor with 97% granulated sugar and 3% corn starch, by weight.  You may be able to sub granulated + cornstarch without blitzing it in the food processor, but it depends on the recipe and why it calls for confectioner's sugar in the first place.  What are you making?

jvlin's picture
jvlin

Thanks for your response! I'm baking a cake, and the recipe calls for confectioner's sugar. I'm guessing it's because they want it super fine, but I figure that super fine granulated sugar works? I'm just worried that the sugar will become too liquidy and make the cake batter overly runny. I've heard that runny batter makes for a more dense, moist cake, while a thicker batter makes for a ligher, airier cake.

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

Superfine granulated will probably work just fine for a cake, you may want to reduce the weight by 3%.  If it's a sponge-type cake, you can whisk the sugar into the eggs and then let that sit for a bit to facilitate dissolving.  If it's a butter cake, superfine might even be preferable to confectioner's sugar.    

Cob's picture
Cob

Hello,

 

I believe the cornstarch is only added as an anti-caking agent. I doubt it matters if you add it.

I'm intrigued, I've never made a cake with icing/confectioner's sugar, only shortbread and hard, baked things, what are you making? Sugar is not liquid. It contains no liquid, but does seem to because it melts.

The way I always go about it is to take small tin (like a beaked beans tin) or ramekin, dump some batter in, bake it for minimal time (seeing as there's only minuscule batter), and test it. If it bakes dry/wet, you can still adjust the main cake batter w/o running the risk of baking the entire thing.