The Fresh Loaf

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Please help me come up with a name for my bakery!!

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areeba's picture
areeba

Please help me come up with a name for my bakery!!

Hello,

 

I'll be grateful if you could take some time, and think about names for my new bakery!

Thanks

Areeba

Syd-a's picture
Syd-a

There are literally a million different variations for names for bakeries. Generally, the best named ones have some sort of connection to the baker themselves or to the area they are in. Do you have any preferences or names you have already thought of that we can spin further? 

My belief on names for businesses are the simpler the better and a connection to the baker.

bruneski's picture
bruneski

... in what language? English? Spanish? Portuguese? French?

Also, where will it be located?

Have a great day! Bruneski.

areeba's picture
areeba

English please :-) Though I love the sound of Spanish as well......

It's located in Karachi!

areeba's picture
areeba

Thank you so much for commenting. This business will be something I will initially run from home, and then later on I hope to acquire a small place for a cafe/ bakery. I will be making blondies, brownies, pecan pies, a couple of cakes, different kinds of cookies, breakfast bars etc.

I'm looking for something really simple and easy to remember. To be honest, I was simply thinking of calling it Blondie's Bakery, though I'm not Blonde. But I'm not sure if that is very interesting. What do you think?

I love reading, dancing (learning professionally), swimming, classic rock. Would that help?

 

This is the only thing that's holding me back now

 

 

 

Cob's picture
Cob

Hey, lucky you!

I agree if you personlise your bakery or connect it to yourself in some way, you can convey it to your customer.

Are you calling it Blondie after those blondie bars? I'm just wondering, why? Do you particularly love them? Will you baking superlative, signature blondies to sell?

If so, then yes, that's an idea. But Blondie's Bakery sounds a bit dull, and actually, for a customer might be mistaken for an actual person, i.e. you as you rightly suggested.

areeba's picture
areeba

Yes, it came from the Blondie bars themselves. But yes, it does sound a bit dull.. :(

Cob's picture
Cob

Don't be :(.

You must have chosen blondie for a reason?

areeba's picture
areeba

Reason was that I do love them, and the fact that people here have not really been introduced to them. in fact pecan nuts are rarely used here. whoever i have fed them to in this part of the world has loved them, so i thought they would be the main attraction.

however, do you have any other names in mind?

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

If you are located in Karachi, and are interested in an English-language name for your bakery, who do you hope to attract as customers?  Local residents?  Expats?  Anglophones, regardless of origin?

Will most of your intended customers understand an English name?  Particularly if it relies on some sort of play on words?  Example: Yeast of Eden.  Yes, it's a horrible pun and, worse, it requires some understanding of Western culture.  Consequently, it may cause nothing but confusion for the people you hope to attract.

Will a name that originates in the UK or in the US be attractive or repulsive to your intended customers?

While it is important that you like the name, it is much more important that your customers can understand and enjoy the name, too.  From what you have described, how about Cafe Blonde?  Or Patisserie Blonde?  Those have more of a French sound, I'll grant you. 

Best of luck with your venture.

Paul

 

areeba's picture
areeba

Hello,

Thanks for your thoughts Paul.

Actually- there are quite a few western style bakeries in Karachi- check out this link:http://www.karachisnob.com/bakeries_karachi.htm

Karachi is a bustling metropolis with an enormous population. There is unfortunately huge disparity amongst the people in more ways than one- in terms of wealth, ideas, literacy etc. Therefore, a market does exist for western foods, tastes, ideas etc. Rather than animosity you may at times find musicians, linguists, artists, chefs, all dedicated to western as well as eastern ideas.

Regardless, I think it would help to keep the name simple and memorable!!

Thanks.

areeba's picture
areeba

Hello,

Thanks for your thoughts Paul.

Actually- there are quite a few western style bakeries in Karachi- check out this link:http://www.karachisnob.com/bakeries_karachi.htm

Karachi is a bustling metropolis with an enormous population. There is unfortunately huge disparity amongst the people in more ways than one- in terms of wealth, ideas, literacy etc. Therefore, a market does exist for western foods, tastes, ideas etc. Rather than animosity you may at times find musicians, linguists, artists, chefs, all dedicated to western as well as eastern ideas.

Regardless, I think it would help to keep the name simple and memorable!!

Thanks.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

but call it a konditorei...   How about  Karachi Konditori  ?

areeba's picture
areeba

Thanks! I do like the sound of that. Konditori may be a bit complex though what do you think? Perhaps I can try and come up with another word with 'K'

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

:)   Karachi Kringle      Karachi Kake    Kake Me Karachi   Kiss Me Kake Kafe

 

Syd-a's picture
Syd-a

As you seem to be aiming to do more sweet bakes than breads, at least in the initial stage, then something with a sweet sounding name. 

As a bread sounding name, "The Upper Crust", or other names "Slice of Heaven", "Blond and Beyond"

Thoughts?

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

I don't think any of us should be granted the honor of helping out with a name to a business that will take so much dedication and personal touch as your bakery will.  I am sure you will come up with something meaningful and personal but at the same time have a marketing savvy appeal to it.  From past experience, coming up with names, be it for a band or business, does not come easy and can be down right frustrating.  Good luck!

John

mini_maggie's picture
mini_maggie

for us in North America to know what will play well in your market.  If Blondies are going to be a staple offering and a fairly unique feature of your shop in that part of the world, Blondie's is not so bad an idea, IMO.  It's a bit cliche and common here, there maybe not so much.  You would know best how much unique cachet it would have there, because ultimately that's what you're looking for. 

bruneski's picture
bruneski

... "Breadistan" might have some appeal.

From my point of view, 8 time zones (1/3 of the globe) west of Karachi, it sounds cute and very 'a propôs'.

But, ... who am I to guess what might work there?

Have a good night's sleep (after all, it's past 12:30 am in Karachi). Bruneski.

jwald's picture
jwald

Ha Ha, I like it!

RedL's picture
RedL

"Treats" or "Sweet treats" or "Treat Cafe" or "Sweet Cafe"

Just brainstorming

 

jwald's picture
jwald

Here is some good advice I keep for reference in helping me with the many businesses I name (most of which are fantasy businesses). I can't remember where I got it but I'm copying and pasting from a pdf here. If you would like the whole pdf which includes many examples of both good and bad names, I can email it to you. 

A strong name is:

1. Differentiated. It should stand out from competitors’ names, as well as from other words in a sentence.
This is sometimes called “speech-stream visibility”, the quality that lets the eye or the ear pick out the
name as a proper (or capitalized) word instead of a common word.
2. Brief. Four syllables or less. More than four, and people start to abbreviate the name in ways that could
be detrimental to the brand.
3. Appropriate. But not so descriptive as to sound generic. A common mistake is to choose a name that
doubles as a descriptor, which will cause it to converge with other descriptive names. Actually, a strong
brand name can be “blind”, meaning that it gives no clue as to its connection with the product, service, or
company it represents, yet still “feels” appropriate.
4. Easy to spell. When you turn your name into a spelling contest, you introduce more confusion among
customers, and make your brand difficult to access in databases that require correct spelling.
Satisfying to pronounce. A good name has “mouthfeel”, meaning that people like the way it sounds and
are therefore more willing to use it.
5. Suitable for “brandplay.” The best names have creative “legs”—they readily lend themselves to great
storytelling, graphics, PR, advertising, and other communications.
6. Legally defensible. The patent office wants to make sure that customers are not confused by soundalike names or look-alike trademarks. A good name is one that keeps legal fees to a minimum

When I'm coming up with names for my businesses, I like to have fun and regularly violate most of the obove rules with variations of "Baby the ____ _____s ____". (Must rhyme with "Baby the Stars Shine Bright" the most awesome store name ever. In case you have never seen the excellent movie "Kamikaze Girls" this is the name of the store in Tokyo that the main character buys all her Lolita/Roccocco style clothing from.)

So for example you could come up with "Baby the Cake's so Light" or "Honey the Pie's Just Right". So far, my personal variations on this are only for my fantasy businesses, but its certainly not cliche and because it contains an obscure cultural reference, you could delight in the few people who "get it" and have a great story for those who don't - so fun! Although Pakastan is probably not the place for this particular reference, maybe it will inspire you to find your perfect "inside story" name. 

Cob's picture
Cob

From what I've seen on the TV about India, it's very cosmpolitan in certain cities and most Indian are multi-lingual, right? I'm not sure about Karachi, but there was a new (not anymore, now I expect) French patisserie making all manner of authentic breads and pastry. Sorry, the name was not my concern. But it was a massive hit with the locals. I believe this was in Pondicherry?...

Anyway, there's this lovely named chain bakery in the UK called Le pain quotidienne, I just love the inspired name. Even without knowing anything about these guys, you get the idea that bread is at the centre of the table and meal. It's all about the, cheesy admittedly, stuff of life.

But as you're offering mainly sweeties....Have you come up with anything?

Dragonbones's picture
Dragonbones

Doh!

Antilope's picture
Antilope

Bakery names:

 

Sweetie Pies, Just Desserts, Tarts From The Heart, Dessert Island, Sweet Treat, From Wheat To Sweet, Sweet Retreat, Discreet Sweets, Petite Sweets, Sweet Tweets, Queen of Tarts, Master of Fine Tarts, It Takes The Cake, Baker's Acres, Refrain of the Cane, The Reign of the Cane, Domain of the Cane, The Invert Dessert, Accosting Frosting, Enticing Icing...