The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Fridge Proofing? Too warm or not to warm?

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Foster Glen's picture
Foster Glen

Fridge Proofing? Too warm or not to warm?

After 8-10 loaves I have been getting some consistent results following the Tartine recipe closely. The book mentions a possible 8-12 hour final rise in the fridge. I decided to try this as it works better with a Fri into Sat schedule for me. Followed all the steps, passed the float test, mixed with 900g KA Gallahad flour and 100 KA WW flour, bulk fermentation in the oven at around 79-80F for 4 hours with turns every 30 min for first 2 hours and then one more at hour 3, shaped, rested as directed, and then final shape and into bannetons from 10PM to about 11:30AM in frdieg at 37F. Took them out during the 40 min 500F preheat and noticed no rise..threw them in anyways and got the saddest flattest loaves ever. The question is should I have let them proof at room temp for a while after fridge? I have a pretty good eyeball for the rise. I read somewhere here that some one actually does another 3 hour rise after the fridge. Shouldn't they be rising the whole time in the fridge? Isn't the point that you just slow it down..not stop it? Kind of confused, 

 

Thanks, 

Glen

Lavanyashah's picture
Lavanyashah

I follow the same Tartine formula and my schedule sounds just like yours.  I don't even take my proofed loaves out of the refrigerator until the oven is completely preheated.  Then I score and slide into the cast iron combo cooker, and it works beautifully.  This was not always the case, and in the beginning, I had poor oven rise.  In my case, it was a problem with the starter.  There are so many variables that may be the cause, and I don't have the expertise to help you figure those out.  If all the other factors are ok, then fridge proofing should work fine for the Tartine method.  I am sure there are lots of people here who will have more helpful input.                                                           

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

want the bread to proof to 85-90% before it hits the oven.  Sometimes the bread doesn't rise in  the fridge and sometimes it does.  If it does that's great ...if not then you have to wait till it does.

Happy baking

Mirko's picture
Mirko

37°F is too cold, 45-48°F is good temp. for retarding.

Mirko

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

36 F for retarding because the labs reproduce at 3 times the rate of yeast at that temperature and this allows for longer retards and much more sour bread results.  At higher temperatures the labs and yeast reproduce a closer to the same rates, retard times are reduced and less sour results.  If you don't want sour or are in more of a hurry than higher temps would be what you want.  Either way makes good bread but colder just meas more sour.

Happy baking

polo's picture
polo

.........on how long of a retard for me. 12 hours at 45 - 48 F will give me overproofed loaves. I prefer 38 - 40 F. I think it's just something you have to experiment with.

Foster Glen's picture
Foster Glen

As always...thanks for you input guys. I went back to my normal routine to try to control for a few things first. I think the problem had most to do with the increasingly warmer temps around here (RI) these days. My last bake (without fridge retard) proofed so much faster than previous ones. The Tartine book says the second rise should be something like 3-4 hours at room temp (75-80F), mine proofed much closer to 1.5 hours. I am wondering if 12 hours in the fridge overproofed it on the last bake..back to testing. Thanks again.

 

-Glen

phaz's picture
phaz

 I'm in s vt  and this  heat wave has changed everything.  my oven even heats twice as fast now!