The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

New no-knead book -- anyone read it?

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JMonkey's picture
JMonkey

New no-knead book -- anyone read it?

I stumbled upon the following article in the NY Times on a new book called, Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day.

From the looks of it, it seems that the author takes a master recipe in which a wet dough is mixed, but not kneaded, and then popped in the fridge overnight, and then adds a lot of variations to create different breads. Anyway, I was curious whether anyone here had read it and, if so, what you thought.

colinwhipple's picture
colinwhipple

The Orange County library system has it on order, so I am going to put in a hold and get it when it arrives.

Colin 

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

here's a link to this subject recently posted....

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4910/here-we-go-again-no-knead-part-deux

JMonkey's picture
JMonkey

I even posted to that thread! I didn't realize they were the same thing .... Sorry folks!

gt's picture
gt

Here's a link to an article about the book plus a video from the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/taste/12149761.html?page=1&c=y

http://www.startribune.com/video/11967361.html

 

 

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

I think it sounds interesting and I'm going to give it a try when I have the time. From looking at the book on Amazon it looks like they do all kinds of breads and pastries. Through the years I've had doughs in the making when something came up and I had to put it in the fridge till I could get back to it. I always ended up making good bread out of these doughs and sometimes I noticed that the bread was even better for the wait. I should have written a book!!

 

The video was very good (unlike the NYT NK video). Note that the author says to put the loaf on the middle shelf not the lower shelf as it's written in the book. Also, in the newspaper article from MN. the author says if there is just a small amount of dough left in the container they just leave it there and add more ingredients for a new batch...fermented bread. Reminds me of an article from the guy who wrote the book THE MAGIC OF FIRE (wonderful, by the way). He writes about European people who have never washed out their wooden bread bowl. They just swirl around some water in the bowl and continue adding flour etc.

 

What the heck, sounds easy. If it's mediocre I'll forget it. weavershouse

jhertz10's picture
jhertz10

I'm Jeff Hertzberg, one of the co-authors of Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, the book from which the recipe comes.  Just to clarify, we store our doughs in the fridge for up to two weeks.  That's the source of the time-saving (mix once, bake many), and the source of the great artisan flavor.  More on our website at www.artisanbreadinfive.com.  More videos, reviews, photos, and information there. 

Jeff

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Hey Jeff,

Thanks for the clarification.

I dropped your publisher a note two or three weeks ago trying to get a copy of the book so I could review it here. I haven't heard anything back though, so I don't know where it stands. I'm still quite interested in checking it out!

jhertz10's picture
jhertz10

Floyd:

Why don't you e-mail me at jhertz10@hotmail.com to discuss?

 Jeff   www.artisanbreadinfive.com   

sphealey's picture
sphealey

For reference the authors' site says they are using a weight equivalent of 142 grams per cup or 2# for the 6-1/2 cup master recipe.

sPh 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I'm not sure I buy into the concept of 5 minutes a day for fresh bread, even if it's true mathematically. I like this and the origional No Knead formula mainly because it brought thousands of people into Artisan bread and revived the movement.

I don't mean to sound like a crab but to me the word Artisan means you attempt to be an artist in the stages of preparation and finishing your work. The object is not to try to make it as easy as possible. The object is to make it as good and beautiful as possible. Artisan is something to strive for. IMHO

SO having gotten that off my chest, I mixed a batch this morning of the master formula, let it ferment for 3 hours and baked half as a single free form loaf. I even preheated the stone just to be fair about the experiment. I did deviate just ever so slightly in that I used a trick I learned from an old master, Professor Calvel. Instead of using straight AP flour, I used 1/2 Cup of White Rye and 6 Cups of Harvest King from Gold Medal. HK is my basic stock flour I use in everything that calls for AP or bread flour. It's almost as strong as KA AP, very high quality at half the cost at least.

The bread baked up very nicely and was delicious. The batch I baked right off after the bulk ferment had a nice after taste that I associate with the addition of rye in small amounts. The nice thing about this bread is that it tastes pretty good for such a short time fermenting. I suspect that the longer the remaining dough sits in the cooler the lower the PH will go and the flavors will build in a similar fashion to sourdough. I couldn't help myself I just had to fold and french fold a couple times to assure the gluten was forming and shape the dough into a boule. So here are the results. I started at 6:00 AM and we were cutting bread at 11:00, slightly warm.

BouleBoule

Slashed and proofedSlashed and proofed
CrumbCrumb

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Eric, this looks interesting. I watched the video and didn't hear the oven temp. mentioned - what did you use? Darn, another bread to try! A.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

AnnieT, I read the NY Times article which calls for a 450 F oven for about 30 minutes on a stone or in a greased pan. The photo above I started under the bowl for the first 15 minutes.

Eric

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Many thanks, Eric. After I was in bed and the computer turned off I had a thought about checking all the references in other posts, too late at that point. Your loaf looks really good - did you use the "grapefruit" sized amount? Thanks again, A.

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Eric, sorry to flog this to death but I would imagine the yeast they use is regular and it would take much less instant yeast? I think I still have a jar of the old fashioned stuff in the refrigerator but it is probably way out of date. A.

jhertz10's picture
jhertz10

Jeff Hertzberg again, one of the co-authors of "Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day."  We call for regular granulated yeast, but it makes no difference; instant yeast works just as well.  You can experiment with decreased amounts of either type of yeast, just be prepared to wait longer than the two or three hours we specify before refrigerating or using (I like to let it fridge at least overnight).  We bake the 1-pound boule at 450 for about 30 minutes.  It should crackle when you take it out. 

I'm glad to say the book is finally available after selling out of its first two printings.  Amazon is quoting a 12/20 "in-stock" date, with Christmas delivery possible if you opt for one-day shipping.  The full book contains a broad range of recipes done with stored dough, including plain breads, multiple kinds of ethnic breads, pastries, brioches, and even doughnuts. 

Jeff Hertzberg    www.artisanbreadinfive.com

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Thank you for the yeast clarification - usually one of the other members will jump in but it was kind of you to take the time. A.

L_M's picture
L_M

Hi Annie,

 I've quite busy lately and haven't had time to bake much bread, but this certainly caught my eye! Instant yeast is the only type I have so that's what I used...for my first attempt I only made 1/3 of the total master recipe just so I could test it out. I used 1 teaspoon of instant yeast and also 1 teaspoon of regular table salt.

I mixed the dough after breakfast, put it right away in the fridge and baked it for dinner. For the preshaping I did a stretch and fold or two, then shaped it into a boule, let it sit for about 10 minutes and then tightened it up. It proofed freeform on parchment paper and baked it using Susan's under a bowl method.

It was excellent!

Good luck!

L_M

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Hi L_M, thanks for the suggestion of making a small batch as a trial. Once I discovered instant yeast that is all I use and I was glad to get your amount specification. I may just have to try it today, A.

jhertz10's picture
jhertz10

Hey all:
I just posted a low-yeast version of our method on our website www.artisanbreadinfive.com.  See what you think.  The commercial yeast taste is less forward and we got a very nice artisanal crumb. 

Jeff Hertzberg

Marvyl's picture
Marvyl

I have read the book and baked bread almost every day since buying it.  I love the European style bread, but never had the time or confidence to bake it.  I have not purchased "store-bought" bread for several weeks.  The bread turns out just like the authors, Zoe and Jeff, say it will and with minimal prep work.  My favorite is the deli rye, but I have made many of the recipes and they are all fabulous.  The brioche makes wonderful bread pudding.  Try it, you'll love it.