The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Another Country Blonde

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adm's picture
adm

Another Country Blonde

I think I might be getting this dialed in now... I just made a couple more of these boules and results look/smell/feel pretty good. No crumb shots yet as they are still cooling.

This is another go at the Forkish recipe, only using a mixer for kneading and no turns or folding. Overnight bulk fermentation at 13C for 13 hours, followed by room temperature proof at 22C. The smaller loaf had 4 hours proofing and the bigger and better looking one got 5 hours. I think I now know that due to my lower overnight fermentation temperature, I need a longer proof time than his recommended 3-4 hours. 5 hours seems about optimal at this room teperature. I'll make another batch in a few days just to check. I am also beginning to get the hang of reading the dough using the finger poke test....

Flour was mainly 50/50 Shipton Mill Type 55 and their Strong Canadian (400g of each), with 40g each of spelt and rye. Hydration was 77%, 2.2% Sel de Geurande, 12% levain. Baking temp was 230C, with 30 minutes covered in a Combo cooker and 20 minutes uncovered.

I only have one combo cooker - and only space in my oven for one anyway, so I think next time I shall put the second loaf back in the fridge while the first one is baking and see how that comes out. At least try to keep the proofing times more or less the same for both...

evonlim's picture
evonlim

very nice round boule. look forward to have a peep at the crumb shot!

happy baking

evon

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

crust on that bread!  If the crumb is anything like the crust you will have a very good looking and tasty bread to devour.

Happy baking

adm's picture
adm

Here's the crumb on one of the boules (and a bit more crust as well). Pretty tasty with some home made butter!

Syd-a's picture
Syd-a

Hi

Bothbthe crust and the crumb look amazing, especially the crust. I really like the dark colour in contrast to the blond crumb. Really very well done. It has a very rustic feel to it. Would you like more air in your crumb or are you happy with the holes as it stands? 

adm's picture
adm

From an aesthetic perspective, I'd like more holes! But from a usability perspective this is very good. The problem with loads of massive holes everywhere is that it's rubbish for holding butter if you toast it, or for keeping sandwich mayo off your fingers! Great for dipping into oil and vinegar though....

The last two of these I made had a somewhat airier crumb (see below), but both batches taste the same. I think somewhere between the two would be about perfect. I'll have another play with this recipe over the weekend. Will probably try slashing one of the two next time and see what happens. These ones were all baked seam side upwards with no slashes to get the "natural" opening.

adm's picture
adm

Cutting a bit deeper into this loaf, the crumb looks better the further into it I get. The more I (we) eat, the happier I am with it!

 

Syd-a's picture
Syd-a

Really great. That latest photo really impresses, we'll done.

i agree entirely, if you are looking more towards a sandwich/holding bread then a mix of holes and crumb is needed, but if you want for soups or mopping up oils, then airy is fantastic. In the end the taste is what trumps everything else and great that it is very tasty. Do you think the combo cooker gave you that awesome crust?

adm's picture
adm

I think the combo cooker definitely helps on getting a good crust. It's probably the proximity of the hot iron to the loaf.

That and baking it high and for long enough of course.