The Fresh Loaf

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What to do with "un-risen" sweet dough?

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MadameC's picture
MadameC

What to do with "un-risen" sweet dough?

Hello All !

I made my first attempt at cinnamon buns, but sadly my dough didn't rise.  I decided to freeze that dough and try again with another yeast. 

So I now have a some un-risen sweet bread dough in the freezer made with really good quality stone ground flour and would hate it to go to waste.  Any ideas for what it could be used for?

Leanne in France

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

and let it rise.  I don't quite understand, why freeze the dough when all you had to do was add more yeast to it.  (A yeast that would work, the old flat yeast wouldn't hurt anything.)

MadameC's picture
MadameC

Thanks Mini Oven :)  I'm new at this, which is why I didn't think of that ;)  I'll know better next time !

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

All you need to do is let the frozen dough thaw out and pat out flat into a round or a rectangle to help warm it up with your hands.  Sprinkle with the yeast or dissolve yeast in a tablespoon of water and smear the yeast onto the dough.  (sometimes a mister is just enough water to help the dry yeast dissolve)  roll up the dough and knead to mix in the new yeast.  Return dough to the bowl, cover, let the dough bulk rise and continue following the recipe.  Easy enough.  

Have fun!

annaengdahl@rocketmail.com's picture
annaengdahl@roc...

 

I roll it out very thin cut it into strips and fry it,then sprinkle with any kind of sugar you like. I like cinnamon sugar, my dauhter prefrers powdered.

lazybaker's picture
lazybaker

When I first made cinnamon buns, I thought why it took forever to rise. It turns out that the butter in the dough made the dough rise really slow. I agree that adding a bit of yeast mixed with a bit of warm liquid would make the dough rise. Also let the dough rise in a warm environment.

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

Enriched broiche-type doughs need higher levels of yeast, and/or osmotolerant yeast.  You can try proofing your "old" yeast in some sugar+warm water to see if the  problem was old, inactive yeast or a formula that didn't have enough to begin with.

As others have mentioned, it is no problem to add more yeast and try again, unless your dough has too much sugar or salt for the yeast to work.  In that case, it is easy to roll the dough flat and cut into crackers, sprinkling the top with cinnamon sugar or anything else that seems good to you.

MadameC's picture
MadameC

I love the idea of cutting out shapes and frying...  Will give that a try ....

 

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

Frying will work, but I was thinking of baking them into crackers.  :)

MadameC's picture
MadameC

Even healthier !  I'll try both :)