The Fresh Loaf

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Soda bread calzone - done in thirty minutes, or so

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Breadandwine's picture
Breadandwine

Soda bread calzone - done in thirty minutes, or so

Made a couple of these, today - one using self-raising white flour for my daughter, and one with wholemeal bread flour and baking powder for myself.

It's a simple matter of knocking up a quick soda bread, rolling it out flat, covering it with the filling of your choice, folding it over and frying both sides in a dry frying pan (covered). 

Simply gorgeous! 

And versatile, too. I made one to serve as a picnic lunch on a walking weekend a few weeks ago - but, in the event, we finished up having a pub lunch, so I brought it back home with me. A week later I found it in the back of the fridge in a plastic bag - I thought it would have gone off, but not a bit of it. Refreshed, again in the frying pan, for a few minutes, I had it for lunch - it was absolutely fine.

IMO, it's the moist ingredients contained in the loaf that keeps it fresh. Mushrooms are perfect for this.

Here's the recipe and a couple of pics on my blog:

http://nobreadisanisland.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/soda-bread-calzone.html

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

How much baking powder for the 200g (less baking powder?) of wholemeal flour?

Breadandwine's picture
Breadandwine

I use 1 teaspoon of baking powder for each 100g of plain flour, white or wholemeal - so 2 teaspoons for this recipe.

I've now included that info in the recipe - thanks for pointing this out.

I did include it in my main 'My daily bread' post:

http://nobreadisanisland.blogspot.co.uk/2012/07/my-daily-bread-6.html

But that's no excuse! 

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

Thank you!

Heidela123's picture
Heidela123

Fried pies!
Where I grew up we called these " fried pies" thanks for the nostalgia and reminder how delicious and truly easy these are! I will make some this week for sureM

Breadandwine's picture
Breadandwine

Thanks for that, Heidela123! I'm guessing Texas? Oklahoma? Whichever, you're a long way from home, ATM!

Seems these 'pies' are deep-fried - which is a step too far for me, I'm afraid. On the other hand...I'm curious to know what they tasted like.

And most of the recipes for them seem to be for fruit-filled pies. I'll have to have a go at that.

Cheers, Paul

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

You'll like Em Paul.  Nothing like a fried apricot pie! It is a Southern thing. 

Heidela123's picture
Heidela123

Paul I am actually a multi ethnic genetic anomaly born and raised in Providence RI with very strong Caribbean influence in my home ( yes The Puget Sound seems forever from home now that my folks are the age they are) . In RI " fried pies" usually apple are( at least a billion years ago when I was a child) a New England tradition .. my husband is retired from the service and we spent a great deal of time in Texas where again I experienced them. In my youth we pan fried them in butter or lard, I learned to deep fry them in Texas, where the world of frying in a huge pot of lethal oil came to light in my life! I ate fried things growing up, but no one taught me how to make them! That I learned in Texas :)

I love fried pies! Fried Empanadas are so similar when made with flour instead
Ps I do find deep-frying far less greasy than pan fried if that helps?

EvaB's picture
EvaB

bannock to me, we ate those all the time when I was a kid, its basically buicuit dough baked in the skillet, and if you roll it out fill it and fold it, and bake it its an easy one pot dish really. Fast food without the grease. You can fry them in the dry skillet, with some bacon grease or butter or deep fry them if you want, its the taste you like.

My brother made these on the pump up camp stove for years when out in the bush, he added fruits to the dough or meat chunks depending and didn't fold them over just made a large bannock and sliced it for the number of people being served. YUM!

 

le boulonger86's picture
le boulonger86

Hello Paul, looks yummy but should it be called "Soda Bread" ? I make Soda Bread quite often and I use Baking Soda not Baking Powder, I'm not trying to nit-pick, the likes of us know the difference but some newbies might get confused you also use self raising flour which again is not Soda Bread, a slip of the pen me thinks, moving on ....... I must say the idea is yummy and so simple well done you for resurrecting it, these simple recipes are soon forgotten which is sad.

All the Best

Breadandwine's picture
Breadandwine

Hi boulanger

I appreciate your comments, but the only difference between baking soda and baking powder is that the first requires an added acid (commonly buttermilk) and the second has the acid 'built in' as it were. They both can be used to make soda bread.

Self-raising flour contains the equivalent of baking powder - the flour I use has sodium hydrogen carbonate (alkali) plus calcium phosphate (acid).

IMO, the term 'soda bread' is just short-hand for any chemically raised bread. :)

I would agree with you if you were saying that I couldn't call a loaf made without buttermilk an Irish soda bread - but I'm not! :)

Regards, B&W