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Yeast question

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dldickins's picture
dldickins

Yeast question

Has anyone heard about creating a starter with just yeast and water? I remember reading about a method to do this approx 25 years ago. I don't remember where I read it and now that I'm gluten intolerant I was wanting to still make a type of sourdough, or a better flavored gluten free bread. I'm not talking about raisin or fruit/yeast water.

From what I remember the yeast and water were allowed to sit for a day or so to develop then added to the recipe. I don't know if some sugar was added, too. Anyway if anyone has heard of this could you please let me know? I'm looking for depth of flavor not yeast activity. I'm sure I would need to add extra yeast when mixing up the dough.

Thanks in advance,

 

Deb

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Deb,

Why don't you mix in a suitable gluten-free flour when you combine the yeast and water.   Failure to give the yeast some food once it is hydrated is surely mere cruelty?

Best wishes

Andy

Faith in Virginia's picture
Faith in Virginia

What your talking about is called a biga or poolish. That is a preferment that adds flavor to your bread.  Starters are something completely different and should not be confused with one another.

Elagins's picture
Elagins

All commercial yeast, both fresh and dry, comes in a nutrient (typically malt) matrix, so hydrating for 24 hours won't kill the fungi, but will deplete their food store, to no real purpose. The purpose of pre-fermenting is to give the enzymes present in dough, usually amylase, diastase and maltase, time to break the complex carbohydrates (starches) down into simple sugars and other flavor notes. Without something to work on, the enzymes won't produce.

I think that if you want more flavorful non-gluten bread, then you ought to take Andy's suggestion and feed the yeast with a carb-rich gluten-free flour such as buckwheat, oat, potato , or corn. Let the little beasties and their enzyme pals do what they're best at and you'll be richly rewarded.

Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

Laurentius's picture
Laurentius

Hi Deb,

Don't you mean Flour and Water? Let that sit a few days then you will have a starter.

dldickins's picture
dldickins

Thanks to all that have replied so far. I guess I shouldn't have called it a starter. Yes it's just yeast and water--no flour. I'm was hoping someone would know why this would be done without flour. I'm trying to use a non carb rich gluten free flour because I'm diabetic and eat low carb. I just thought if I could get a more develped yeast flavor in the bread, even if I have to add some baking powder for leavening, it would be better than going without.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

You want more yeasty taste in a non yeasty... say, a stiff egg white batter?

The problem is, that yeasty taste is not the yeast but the fermentation byproducts that is tasted.  Yeast doesn't really have a taste after it is baked.  How about adding fermented ingredients to the batter or dough?  You could ferment some of your special flour or some seasonal fruit turning it into wine and in the process burn up the sugars present.   Adding yeast to your non-gluten flour will ferment it.  Keep tasting it as time goes until you get something you like, then add the rest of the ingredients and bake it.  Can't hurt to try.  Or ferment some wheat until it is hooch and add that.   Or what about a shot of fermented barley malt?

Elagins's picture
Elagins

which nobody ever accused of gustatory reticence.

Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Deb,

I don't see how you would develop flavour from mixing yeast and water in advance.   You achieve that through fermentation.   What's the problem with using a gluten free flour as a source of food [sugar] for the yeast.

I'm not getting what you are trying to say here.   Why are you even considering bringing baking powder into the mix?

Never mind about the semantics of what a "starter" is; if you want flavoursome lean bread which is additive-free, then you need to be in the fermentation game.   Yeast plus sugar produces carbon dioxide and alchohol.   Stay in the party and keep having fun!

Best wishes

Andy

ps. Have you looked at Juergen's work here? http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/33774/gf-experiments-2