The Fresh Loaf

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7 Grain Double Starter Soaker Bread

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isand66's picture
isand66

7 Grain Double Starter Soaker Bread

Well since the last few bakes have been very white I started to feel the Force draining and I was being pulled towards the Dark Side!  This bread is a 70% whole grain power-house made with a soaker which I scalded to make sure it was nice and soft.  I used 5 different whole grains in the scald and 3 whole grain flours plus some French style flour in the double starters and main dough.

I also wanted to try something a little fancy for the shaping and placed a small ball of dough along with a double braid in the bottom of my basket before placing the rest of the dough on top of both of them.  This formed a nice hat on top of the bread.

The soaker was brought up to a boil and scalded for about 10 minutes until all the grains were nice and soft and then put in a bowl and covered for 5-6 hours until the levains were ready to use.

The end result of this bake was a nice wholesome tasty bread. The crust was excellent and the crumb was soft and chewy chock full of grainy goodness.

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Levain Directions

Starter 1

Mix all the levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Starter 2

Mix all the ingredients listed with the levain from the first build and let it set at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled or before it starts collapsing on itself.  Either use right away in the main dough or refrigerate for 1 day.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours and the water except for around 75 grams, together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 30 minutes to 1 hour.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), honey, and soaked grains and mix on low for a minute.  Add the rest of the water  unless the dough is way too wet.   Mix on low-speed for another 4 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  (I used my new proofer this time and it only took about 1 hour at 80 degrees).

Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  (Again, I used my proofer set at 80 degrees and let it rise for about 1.5 hours).

Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Risenin-basket

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

Scored

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  I baked for about 10 minutes at 450 and then lowered the oven to 435 since this is such a large loaf.  Bake for around 50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Crumb2

Peony

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Comments

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Lovely looking bread, Ian! This is my kind of bread.

Welcome back to the Dark side ;)

-Khalid

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Khalid.  You would love this bread I believe.  I still have not come close to one of DA's kitchen sink breads, but this one had plenty of whole grain goodness to turn out a flavorful healthy bread.

Regards,
Ian

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Another fine bake Ian!

Cheers,

Wingnut

isand66's picture
isand66

Appreciate your comments as always Wingnut.

Regards,
Ian

varda's picture
varda

and full of flavor.   Interesting shaping technique.   I'll have to try it.  -Varda

isand66's picture
isand66

This one really tastes great especially for such a wholesome healthy loaf.

I was inspired by DA with the shaping technique as well as someone who recently posted a bread with a braided rope.  It certainly opens up many possibilities.

Thanks as always for your comments.

Regards,
Ian

BreadChubby's picture
BreadChubby

Okay Ian your bread is amazing and I wish I could understand your recipes ( I am a Newbie).
What is Scalding please?

isand66's picture
isand66

Scalding is simply boiling the liquid you soak the grains and in some case flours until soft.

Appreciate the comments.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Nice top hat Ian!  We love doing the various shapes possible with Chacons.  This is my kind of bread and I know we could eat it all week no problem.  It is a large loaf but, when the bead is good, it needs to be larger !  Now we have to get you using seeds and nuts and your conversion to the dark side will be complete young Chaconwalker:-)  Don't you just love the chewy bits in these breads?

One this is for sure, this isn't your everyday white slice,

Happy baking ian

isand66's picture
isand66

Yes, this was my first attempt at a Chacon style bread and it came out pretty good.  I've been meaning to try it for a while. Mookie-baca really loves this one.  This was the first time I actually boiled the soaker and I'm glad i did.  The soaker did soak up 99% of the water so I added that into the formula.  I was out of commission yesterday so I didn't get to even have any, so I will have a nice sandwhich today for lunch.  I also made a Cherry loaf which is more on the light side but came out real good.  i wll post that tonigh most likely.

I've used nuts in bread and seeds but never together..m wife is not  big fan of either so I have been hesitant, but I think it's time!

Look forward to your next bake.

The Emperor sends his regards from the Dark Side....:)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of potato and Durum flour split in the dough flour?  It says 0 grams for each?

isand66's picture
isand66

They are not in it.  I screwed up the chart.  there is 130 grams of Turkey Wheat flour which should be there instead.

I will have to fix that later.

Thanks fo noticing.

isand66's picture
isand66

thanks DA for noticing the mistake.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

liked it better with potato and Durum in the mix but she is an ingredient floozy or even a junkie at times :-)