The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Blowing out sides of maple oatmeal bread

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AcadianBaker's picture
AcadianBaker

Blowing out sides of maple oatmeal bread

I've made Bernard Clayton's oatmeal maple bread a couple of times now and every time one side of each loaf blows out just at the top of the loaf pan.  I've only had this happen once before with Peter Reinhart's potato, cheddar and chive loaf because I didn't score the top quite deeply enough for the cheese to bubble out so it forced its way out the side.  Anyway, aside from that I've never had this happen before and am not sure why it's happening - and unfortunately I didn't get a picture for you to look at before the loaves got eaten up.  The flavour and texture are great and it's our new favourite bread but it's not looking as pretty as I'd like.  I'd love to hear any suggestions on how to avoid this so I can turn out a better looking loaf because I love everything else about it!

isand66's picture
isand66

It's either your shaping or the loaf is underproofed.  If you don't form enough tension when you shape the loaf this can happen and if you don't proof the dough long enough the same type of thing can happen.

What is your shaping technique and how are you determining when it's time to bake?

AcadianBaker's picture
AcadianBaker

It may be a combination of both the shaping and the proofing.  The dough is still quite sticky when I shape it (just as I would a regular sandwich bread) and I'd say I'm not getting enough tension because it's sticking to the counter as I roll it up and I was hesitant to flour the surface because then the seam and the ends wouldn't stay pinched closed.

For determining time to bake I was honestly just following the time the recipe suggested.  (Where's that blushing smiley face when I need it?)

isand66's picture
isand66

To prevent the sticking without flour, use cooking spray and spray it on your hands as well.  You can find some good videos on shaping on Youtube which will help you learn several ways to shape.  Once you find one you like just practice and before you know it you will be a pro.  You don't want to man-handle the dough though.

For the timing thing I suggest you do the poke test.  Poke a finger in the dough and if it leaves an indent that rises slowly you are ready to go.  If it doesn't come back at all, chances are you overproofed.  The only time this doesn't work is when you are using a dough you have retarded in the refrigerator.

Good luck and let me know if I can be of any further assistance.

Ian

AcadianBaker's picture
AcadianBaker

Thanks Ian, I appreciate the advice.  Next time I bake this loaf I expect I should have very good results!