The Fresh Loaf

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3 Seed 25% Rye

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hungryscholar's picture
hungryscholar

3 Seed 25% Rye

3 Seed rye crumb

I really have to pony up and get some honest to goodness first clear flour, I keep trying other substitutes, but not the real thing. Of course, I seem to recall reading that it was originally used in deli rye because of cost, and now it looks like I'd have to special order it for a higher cost per pound then good old AP. Go figure. Anyhow, this attempt is around 25% pumpernickel rye and the rest Great River Milling "Unbleached Wheat Flour" which has 80% of the bran removed but otherwise is more or less whole wheat flour. Which means I probably could have gone higher with the hydration- I'm happy with the crumb, but kneading the dough felt quite stiff. But then again, whole wheat and rye both still have a way of throwing me for a loop in that regard. I kept waiting for the rise and end up giving it 6 hours before I had to put it in the oven so it I wouldn't be up past my bedtime. I love fennel seeds in rye and this time decided to throw in a couple of other seeds I had on hand.

3 Seed 25% Rye

211g Water

45g stiff levain

82g pumpernickel rye

225g GR Wheat Flour

6g salt

2 tsp each fennel, chia, and black sesame seeds

Mixed everything together and kneaded for a few minutes initially and then some kneading every so often for the first couple of hours. Shaped after three hours proofing at 82 F and let rise at 86 F for another 3 before baking in a Dutch oven preheated to 500 F and baked at 425 F.

 

 

 

Comments

evonlim's picture
evonlim

it did raised up beautifully. good dense loaf. with some sweet liquorice note from the fennel seeds, my favorite too.

happy baking

evon

hungryscholar's picture
hungryscholar

It's quite tasty- the occasional sunflower seed on the crust adds a crunch and makes me think I should roll/or sprinkle some seeds on top next time.

-HungryS

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

very much.  Love the seeds too.  Throwing in what you have on hand is always the best you can do at the time - if you don' jhave a nutzoid apprentice who buries bread stiff in the back yard just to make sure she isn't out of anything:-)

This bread has to taste very good!

Happy baking

hungryscholar's picture
hungryscholar

I figure it's got to be tasty as it has driven at least one member of the household to get up in the middle of the night and eat a slice. And I'm definitely an improviser- sometimes it works out and sometimes it's a "lessons learnt" sort of situation.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Good, healthy simple loaf! Good work HungryS.

If you really love wholesome breads, you might want to soak part of the wholegrain flours at least overnight as a soaker. Peter rienhar's book: wholegrain breads contains several recipes that promise great flavor and light soft crumb for 100% whole grain breads.

-Khalid

hungryscholar's picture
hungryscholar

That's one of the few Reinhart books I haven't looked into. His "epoxy" method has a catchy name, but I haven't tried it out yet. That's partly because I often decide to bake bread in one day even though I know there's interesting flavor to be had by letting some portion of the dough hang out overnight without inviting the yeast or sourdough culture to the party.

I bought a 25 pound bag of this almost- whole wheat flour and have been experimenting with it. Because I grew up on Wonderbread-style whole wheat sandwich bread I'm not that keen on a straight whole wheat loaf, but paired with rye and sourdough like this I really enjoyed it.

-HungryS