The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

my modified banneton for perfect placement of boule in dutch oven

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beakernz's picture
beakernz

my modified banneton for perfect placement of boule in dutch oven

Just thought I would share my banneton tweak.  I have a big dutch oven and often wrestled with getting the boule into it without disturbing it's shape.  This is the best tweak I've made.  I can now easily drop the boule in and get perfect shape.   Total cost of the mod about $3

 

Video:

http://youtu.be/1AzKLH0Jpqc

Results:

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

It looks like  a paper bowl with two drawer handles for your palm when you flip the dough into the DO.  Wouldn't the screws on the other side poke into your dough?

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

Please tell us what that's a picture of.

I solved your problem by letting my doughs rise in a parchment-paper lined bowl.  In place the dough into the heated Dutch oven by picking it up using the parchment paper as a cradle.  When I do the transfer, the Dutch oven's on the counter or stovetop, oven door closed to reduce heat loss, and my hands without oven mitts on for the transfer only.  Once the transfer's completed, the mitts go back on for the transfer of the DO back into the oven.  Doing it this way, I've stopped getting burned on the DO.  The parchment paper gets pealed off the bread with no difficulty once the loaf's taken out.

108 breads's picture
108 breads

A video of either type of transfer previously mentioned - the door handles or the parchment paper. I need a visual to put this together. Plus, are those door handles?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

keeping the banneton off any surfaces, also not a bad idea.  When ready to load the DO, the hot or cold DO could be inverted over the banneton (dough up, covered with or w/o baking parchment) and with oven mitts the whole thing can be inverted gently until the banneton appears like the photo -- handles up to lift the banneton out of the DO.  Tah dah!   :)  

A gentle solution to dropping the dough into the DO.  I even think I could tie a heavy cotton string onto the bottom of my cane banneton for just such a purpose, to lift the banneton out of a hot pot when the edges are resting in the hot pot and tricky to lift.  This has happened often enough.  

Gary Clifton's picture
Gary Clifton

Hi,

How did you get the two handles to stick?

Gary Clifton

beakernz's picture
beakernz

They are just cabinet handles, held in by screws from the other side.  The screw heads seat flat into the banneton so it's not a problem, pretty much covered with flour now.

beakernz's picture
beakernz

I'll post a video of me using it when i do my load today (few hours)

beakernz's picture
beakernz

Here's the video:  http://youtu.be/1AzKLH0Jpqc

I make my cuts quickly after I drop it in..

beakernz's picture
beakernz

and here's the loaf from the video:

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

Your DO is much larger than the banneton to give yourself  enough room to move around,   your dough is also firm and  did not spread out to fill out the size  of your DO.  I should see if my dough would  be the same if I used a 24 cm DO.

beakernz's picture
beakernz

The DO in the vid is 29cm model.  I used to have issues with over proofing but I have an eye for the dough now and when it's ready :)

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

your  breads look so good and mine so lousy. :)   What sort of bowl are you using,  it looks to me like a heavy duty disposable paper bowl.  

 

Judy

beakernz's picture
beakernz

Here are the details on my banneton.  Sorry you're not having much luck yet.  You'll get there!

High quality German Bannetons made from natural conifer wood fibre. Ideal for making organic bread as only natural materials are used to make these bowls (wood fibre, water).

You use bannetons to prove & shape loaves of bread. The Banneton supports & holds the shape of the loaf as it rises. The imprinted pattern on the inside of the bowl puts a pattern on the outside of the loaf.

Features of natural wood fibre Bannetons ...

The dough does not stick to the bowl as it can/and does with cane bannetons

The bowls have thick walls with superb insulation properties - bread will prove (rise) faster

Better moisture absorption by the bowl (giving it back to the dough as needed) improves dough proving

Easier to clean, just use a small hard brush to brush out surplus flour

For ecological reasons this material should be favored to cane.

The bowls will hold a wet dough loaf from 750g to 1000g depending on the banneton size (see photos).

These Bannetons are used by professional NZ artisan bead bakers.

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

as I 've  seen  paper plates and bowls with very similar texture in the supermarkets and thought these were made from the same stuff material.

Judy