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Multigrain SD with Japanese Black Rice, Seeds, Prunes & Dried Edamame

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Multigrain SD with Japanese Black Rice, Seeds, Prunes & Dried Edamame

After Evon’s post of her bread with Japanese Black Rice in it, we knew it had to get to the top pf the bake list like Hanseata’s Wild Rice bread did when it appeared.  We had run across some of this rice a couple of months ago at Sprouts and had cooked it for dinner.  We knew it would end up in bread eventually and Evon’s post was the impetus.

 

The question was what kind of bread to put it in?  My apprentice went back and looked at our take of the Karin’s wonderful Wild Rice Bread and quickly knew that we would do something similar to it, perhaps not as dark or complicated.

 

Since I started medicating my apprentice with Sylvia’s Dog Bones, she isn’t as determined or anal as usual - even though she has taken to licking the glow in the dark, black light intensified picture we have of Elvis performing in Las Vagas.   Here was that bake:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/28806/hanseata%E2%80%99s-wild-rice-sd-w-yeast-water-multi-seeds-prunes-beer-and-sprouts

Here is Karin’s original post :

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/24092/wild-rice-sourdough-bread-ended-cold-war

Here is Evon’s inspirational bake, if a little dark, : Sprouted Organic Wild Black Rice SD Bread

 

It isn’t often we have a new bread ingredient like Japanese Wild Rice but Evon’s bread also had edamame in it – a second ingredient we have never seen used in bread before.  And as luck would have it, we had 3 kinds of edamame in the pantry and freezer.  We had fresh shelled edamame in the freezer. Wasabi dried edamame (my favorite after a few beers) and regular dried edamame.

 

You can tell we eat it a lot around here since it is my daughter’s favorite veggie.  We decided to be our normal conservative self when it comes to baking, as opposed to my apprentice’s solution for cleaning tile grout or magnesium rims on fine, if old, motorcycles.  So, we went with the non Wasabi dried edamame even though the black rice is Japanese.  You just can’t make apprentice’s think after leading them to water.

 

We sprouted the black rice and thought we had killed it when we forgot it was soaking and let it go for 8 hours before draining and putting them between damp paper towels.   But the rice loved it and after 2 days had sprouted well.  My apprentice was especially thrilled since this was her first time sprouting any kind of rice.

 

We did the standard (3) 4 hour levain build by putting all of the whole multi-grains in the levain.  Since it was white flour in the dough, we autolysed it for 1 hour only with the VWG, Toadies, red and white malts.  Once the levain and autolyse came together we did 10 minutes of slap and folds.

My apprentice sang one of her favorite tunes while doing the S& F’s - an Oriental cowboy song called - ‘Yippee Oh Kiyae, I am a Japanese Hot Dog, Bun Making Sandman.’  I reminded her that we wouldn’t be making hot dog buns till later in the day but she was in the groove and just wouldn’t be stopped with her being a hot dog and Japanese rice in the mix.  I’m guessing it won’t be the last time I hear this odd tune today.

 

After a 15 minute rest we did 3 sets of S& F’s on 15 minute intervals and added the edamame, black rice sprouts, ground non aromatic and aromatic seed variety and prunes on the first set.  By the 3rd set they were well distributed.  After another 15 minute rest, we divided the dough in half, shaped each and placed them into rice floured baskets and then into used plastic trash can liners.

 

After a 30 minute rest on the counter the baskets were placed into the fridge for an 18 hour retard.  By the next morning they had risen well in the fridge.  They came out of the cold for one hours to warm up before we fired up Big Old Betsy with Sylvia’s and David’s Patented Steaming Combo.

 

It took 45 minutes for the oven to get to 500 F including the 20 minutes for the top and bottom stones to get to that temperature lagging 20 minute behind.  We really cut back on the rice flour this time and worried that the dough would stick to the baskets but they came out no worries after a rap on the parchment covered peel.  A quick slash and into the oven they went.

 

After 2 minutes of steam at 500 F we turned the oven down to 465 F for a further 10 minutes of steam.  After removing the steam, we turned the oven down to 450 F, convection this time and let the bread finish baking to 205 F on the inside while rotating the bread ever 5 minute on the stone.  Total baking time was 27 minutes with 15 of it without steam.

 

It browned up, bloomed out had a few blisters and an ear where we tried to get one.  I like the color of this bread and the pattern that the baskets put on them.  They smell like they will be tasty if not delicious.  Have to wait for the crumb shot till after lunch .

The crumb is soft, light, open and moist.  The taste is totally unique and unlike Hanseata's Wild Rice bread.   We really like this bread.  the dried edamame will be a routine bread ingrediant from now on - we love the mouth feel and taste of them in thsi bread very much.   We love rhe contrasting ncolors and textures of teh crumb - very appealing!  It is another fine bread of late and a shout out goes to Evon for her inspiration and fine post of her bread.  One more crumb picture for Lucy!

Formula

Whole Wheat and Rye Levain

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW and Rye Sour Starter

20

0

0

20

3.17%

Whole Wheat

15

15

15

45

7.14%

Spelt

0

15

15

30

4.76%

Rye

15

15

15

45

7.14%

Water

30

45

20

95

15.08%

Total

80

90

65

235

37.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

130

20.63%

 

 

 

Water

105

16.67%

 

 

 

Hydration

80.77%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

16.79%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

500

79.37%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

500

79.37%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

1.75%

 

 

 

Water

382

60.63%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

76.40%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

630.0

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

487

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

77.30%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

25.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

72.90%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,400

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Toadies

20

3.17%

 

 

 

Prunes

72

11.43%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

4

0.63%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

4

0.63%

 

 

 

Dried Edamame

35

5.56%

 

 

 

Ground Sesame & Flax Seeds

12

1.90%

 

 

 

Poppy Seeds

3

0.48%

 

 

 

Anise, Coriander, Caraway & Fennel

12

1.90%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

1.59%

 

 

 

Total

172

27.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Japanese Back Rice

100

15.87%

 

 

 

Total Sprouts

100

15.87%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight for Japanese Black Rice is the dry weight.

 

 

 

 

Comments

varda's picture
varda

looks wicked cool.   I've never seen it before.  Enjoy!  -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

in this bread but I like the taste of Wild Rice in bread better though.  The picture really doesn't give one a real picture of true amount of add ins in this bread.  It is chock full of flavor with all the seeds .  Here is better picture.  Happy baking Varda.

 

 

kenlklaser's picture
kenlklaser

In the section of the formula sub-titled "dough flour", a line says"AP 500 79.37%", then the next line is what I'm curious about, it says "dough flour 500 79.37%".

What is "dough flour"?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Total Dough Flour.  Dough flour is flour that is not in the bigal, poolish, or levain.  It is a way of separating what is added to the the finished preferment to make the bread,  In my case this dough flour is always the flour that is autolysed although there are other things in the autolyse too. 

This case is sort of strange because usually we have several dough flours in most of our breads but in this case only 500 G of AP flour was used.

Hope this helps and happy baking 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Looks great.  maybe thats what I can do with the black rice I bought at Costco.  next weeks bake maybe

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I though about cooking the rice in a rice cooker but went for sprouts because we had the time and I haven't ever sprouted rice before.  It is a fine bread that is very healthy and easy enough if you keep the seeds ready to go,  already prepared around the kitchen for putting in breads, Pistachios would be a good sub for the dried edamame and in keeping with the green color.  This bread would be fine with 75% Hydration too.

Happy baking,

evonlim's picture
evonlim

you out done yourself again!! great bake, what a brilliant combination. came out beautiful, love the crust and of course the unbeatable add ins!! loving it...

mine was darker because of the ramie leaves and i grind the black rice sprouts mixed in the dough as well. 

prunes.. hesitate to put this in bread. think i will try sometime soon. seeds and spices great flavor. did you toast the spices? this will bring out the oil and flavor. dry edamame who will thought of that!

building your levian 3 times, what is the purpose? more sour? more flavor? stronger levian?

congratulations! yes, it is a celebration bake!! 

(floyd, this is a winner to be featured)

so happy ..

evon

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

since yours inspired it.  We keep 3 kinds of toasted stuff in air tight containers.  Toadies (various bran's, sifted middlings and wheat germ) that is ground after toasting,  Toasted aromatic seeds that are crushed quickly in a mortar (fennel, coriander, anise and caraway) and toasted non aromatic seeds (various sesame and flax seeds) that are ground after toasting. We keep all 3 in the freezer to keep them fresh.  Then it is easy to put them in any bread on a whim.

Since we keep a maximum of 80 grams of any one stiff SD starter in the fridge, we usually use 10 - 15 g of seed for any bake.  By building it it slowly over (3) 4 hour builds you know that the levain is at its peak when it doubles in the last 4 hours you can refrigerate it after the 2nd and 3rd builds for 24 hours each to increase the sour substantially.  This bread was wonderfully sour and it pared well with all the add ins.  We love prunes in bread as much as any other dried fruit.   We love Andy's prune and Brazil nut SD bread even though we add a bunch of stuff to it too.

We are having this bread for breakfast today with some nice bacon and various fruits - can't wait!  thanks for the inspiration and Happy Baking.

isand66's picture
isand66

Your photo of the bread with all the add-in lined up reminds me of the I Love Lucy episode on the candy assembly line :)

Next thing you know you will be building a rice paddy in your backyard!

I have not made a wild rice bread in years so I will have to move this up a few notches on my bake list.  I do have to try using beans again in one of my bakes.  The last time I had overkill and ended up with a disaster but your latest adventure looks perfect.  Nice moisst open crumb for so much packed goodies.

Onward to your "Lucy" buns next!

I will hopefully have time today during the rain to bake my latest experiments.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

one of the recent breads that we like very mush.  The sour really pairs well with the add ins.  It is just delicious with a thick, bold crust and moist, soft crumb.  Can't ask for more than that - except for bacon of course :-)

Beans can have way more protein than flour so are  a healthy add in.  I try to keep them at 10% or less of the total weight though - garbanzos are my favorite for bread but I am going to sprout some mung beans for a bread pretty soon.  Beans can make a bread go brickie pretty fast so sprouting them and using them whole will help make them less ........heavy.

This one is a keeper!

Look forward to your next experimental post,

Happy Baking Ian