The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Dough Hook

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bures's picture
bures

Dough Hook

I have just purchased a Bosch Food Mixer with a dough hook.
I made the bread by allowing the appliance to mix the ingrediants for about 5 minutes. I then took out the dough and kneeded it by hand for about 10 mins, Let it rest for an hour, knocked out the air  then another hour before going into the oven.

Superb loaf of bread, best I have ever made.

Now, I purchased this Bosch with the objective that can do all the kneeding for me, rather than my hand method.

A breadmaker carries out this task by replicating my hand process, ie, it never leaves the breadmaker from start to finish

Cant find anything on the net on how a Dough Hook can complete the entire kneeding process liker a breadmaker ?

Any comments would be appreciated

 

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi bures,

Is there any reason why you turned the mixer off after only 5 minutes and then chose to use your hands?

An electric mixer will probably not fully develop the dough in 5 minutes; you would need to mix for longer than that, or seek alternative process methods.

Best wishes

Andy

bures's picture
bures

No particular reason, other than the dough looked the correct constituency for kneeding

So how long should I let it mix then, 10 mins ?  Can I then switch off the mixer to let the dough rise in the bowl before giving it another mix ,to knock out the air
ie simulate a breadmixer

As you can see, I have no idea what I am doing as I used to make all my bread by hand before.

As it was jolly hard work, thats why I went down the dough hook route

 

alan

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Alan,

If you are familiar with hand-mixing then you have the knowledge you need.   Use your sensory experience of mixing by hand, and keep checking the dough as it develops in the machine.   It's impossible to give you advice in the form a fixed amount of time, sorry.

You might want to explore "the window pane" test; how finely can you stretch out a piece of dough before the gluten window tears?

One warning about machine mixing: watch your dough temperature, as many small machines lack power, so there is a lot of heat input for not much dough development.   If your dough temperature exceeds 30*C then you are very likely to face problems during bulk and final fermentation.

Best wishes

Andy

bures's picture
bures

Andy

thanks fo those tips, much appreciated

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

If you have the Bosch Universal or Universal Plus,  I think Bosch suggests that a standard loaf  will be pretty fully kneaded in about 4 minutes.  

bures's picture
bures

Well, guessing I gave it 5 mins and it was perfect

Is it best to let the mixer carry out the kneeding or use the traditional method of using your hands

alan

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Alan,

The answer to your question is complex.   It really does depend on what type of bread you are seeking to make.

If you are looking to replicate a typical loaf bought from a supermarket, then an electric mixer will give the mechanical dough development characteristic of that type of loaf.

There are, however, many different types of bread, made in different ways.   So it really depends what you want to make.

Best wishes

Andy