The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Dutch Brown Bread - Bruinbrood

  • Pin It
sunhana's picture
sunhana

Dutch Brown Bread - Bruinbrood

I've never eaten dutch brown bread but my colleague ate it back in holland, adores it. I've came up with a recipe that uses 100% wholemeal flour, molasses syrup, instant yeast, gluten flour, salt and olive oil. Used prefermented dough method and the end result is soft, fluffy bread. the texture is okay but the color of the bread is not as dark as what my friend described. can anyone share their dutch brown bread recipe with me? or any pointers to get dark brown colored bread? I added a lot of molasses syrup but it just doesn't darken it that much.My friend said it's not rye (i tried added rye but she said brown bread has no sour taste). Please help...thanks.

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

You can buy it in some stores, or make it yourself.  Or, if you're really desperate for the dark colour, use Kitchen Bouquet.

sunhana's picture
sunhana

So instead of molasses syrup, i should use caramel syrup?

PaddyL, sorry to ask, are u dutch? i am desperate for the authentic dutch brown bread recipe as i have attempted making it 5 times (all different recipes and combinations) but somehow the color just didn't work out. the only time it works is using almost 40% rye flour. but my friend said the dutch brown bread has no "tangy" taste (from rye).

Ok, maybe i will make caramel syrup next time to replace my molasses syrup (molasses syrup is in fact very dark in color).

thanks for the tip

sunhana's picture
sunhana

hmm...wonder if i can add some carob powder to darken it. but i don't want that "chocolate" taste as i think the dutch brown bread doesn't have such taste. has anyone tried using carob powder in bread?

LizvandeVal's picture
LizvandeVal

Hi Sunhana, thats right, there isnt rye in Dutch bruinbrood. Rye is more common in German bread. Dutch bread is made of wholemeal flour, so the bread will be colored golden brown. When it is as dark as you want it, it is colored ( and tasted slightly bitter) because of ( lots of ) malt and there is no wholemeal in it....... So try breadflour and some sunflowerseeds or pine seeds. Hope you gets your Dutch bruinbrood .

Liz from the Netherlands

 

sunhana's picture
sunhana

Thanks Liz. maybe i can use some malt extract to darken my wholemeal bread.

is it possible to describe the taste of bruinbrood? do u have a recipe that i can use? i can't read dutch so cannot use dutch recipes.

this is what i made yesterday with sunflow seeds but the color is not right.

 

LizvandeVal's picture
LizvandeVal

I think you like the taste of the molasse.... so I said slightley bitter. The whole meal flour bread without the molasse taste a bit like Vitamin B and a bit sweetness from the baking process. I cant describe it better :-). What kind of melasse do you use? Here we use blackstrap melasse. You can find it mostley in Chinese stores.

 

 

LizvandeVal's picture
LizvandeVal

Your breads look lovely and very Dutch lol

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I googled the images of bruinbrood and most of them match what your bread looks like. A few were darker but when you visit the web page, these are commercially made loaves with LOTS of ingredients. I don't read Dutch or German but I can figure out enough to know there are gums and colorants. Your ingredients are much nicer!

If you want to just darken the bread for aesthetics, you have some options but I don't know if they would be "authentic".

1.Caramelized sugar along with the molasses is one. That way it won't be so bitter as the amount of molasses is decreased.

2.Use strong,dark coffe as the liquid or even instant  coffee powder.

3.Use cocoa or carob powder.

4.And King Arthur makes a caramel powder which is actually dried caramelized sugar that gives a nice dark coloration.

Kitchen Bouqet has other savory flavors in it but they might get lost so it might be worth a try. It is mostly carmelized sugar, I believe.

Have fun!

sunhana's picture
sunhana

Sharing my recipe here and see if anyone can help to improve this recipe...

Preferment dough

150g wholemeal flour, 110g water, 4g instant yeast,  2 tbsp molasses, 1/4 tsp salt

Mix and keep in fridge for at least 5 hrs

Mix prefermented dough with the following

50g wholemeal flour, 40g water, 1 tbsp olive oil, tbsp gluten flour, 1 tbsp millet

Mix until able to stretch thin window pane

Bake at 200 degree celcius for 30 mins

carefreebaker's picture
carefreebaker

Your bruinbrood looks like the color I had while living in Holland. is that krentenbrood I see? 

sunhana's picture
sunhana

I made 2 loaves and passed it to my colleague. she is kind enough to pass me back one slice to show me the inside. this is the pix. hmm i should say the color is close enough. but my colleague said maybe i can add a bit of sweetness to it (i didnt add any sugar except the molasses syrup for the coloring). From what i gathered from Liz, bruinbrood does has a bit of sweetness...maybe i will add about 20g to my recipe. So there is no standard recipe for bruinbrood?

Krentenbrood, the very first pix was given from my colleague which she took back in holland. The 2nd pic of the loaves with sunflower seeds are the one i made and also this pix attached.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

What a lovely soft looking whole wheat bread, Sunhana!

So, they use coloring exclusively for the brown effect, not whole wheat flour? or they use a mix of both?

-Khalid

sunhana's picture
sunhana

Hi Mebake, after making 6 different recipes (most of it i came up on my own), i am still clueless what contributes to the dark brown coloring. According to Liz from netherland, it might be caramel coloring that the baker used. But today i happened to come across this recipe that uses malt syrup which gives extra brown coloring, sweetness and flavour. will give this a try on sunday. stay tuned as i will post the modified recipe if it comes out successful.

henkverhaar's picture
henkverhaar

This is actually darker than 'brown bread' (volkorenbrood / bruin brood / wholemeal bread) that you'd normally buy in the Netherlands at a 'normal' bakery or in a supermarket (note that recipe-wise, there's not much difference between factory bread and bread prepared by a normal bakery ('warme bakker')). The only (non-rye) bread that you can find that is much darker than that is bread with a significant amount of dark malt added (a prime example would be the semi-famous 'Do Schat' bread - well known in and around Utrecht; also note that famed composer Peter Schat was a member of the Schat family of bakers...)

Having said that, I would state that what you show is 'brown enough'. My bread is usually a mix of 50%/50% unbleached flour and wholewheat meal (both from an operating wind mill), and is about the same colour as the wholemeal bread you'd buy at an organic food store or bakery. I would also suggest losing the molasses, and possibly the gluten powder - a 50/50 mix of good bread flour and wholewheat meal should suffice - especially if you want to forego the 'Dutch brown bread' simile and go for a bread that is based on a preferment, preferably with sourdough: bread...

sunhana's picture
sunhana

Hi henkverhaar, your loaves are so beautiful. Possible to share your recipe? I do have sourdough starter in my fridge calling out for me to use it =)...would love to give your recipe a try.

sunhana's picture
sunhana

Another "blind" attempt in making bruinbrood. This time, i added malt syrup. The dough is very wet as i didnt reduce the water. i almost gave up while waiting for the dough to proof but i just proceeded. To my surprise, the final loaf proof, the dough just started kicking in proofing beautifully. it grew 4 times its original size. the end product is this sweet and very tasty malt bread. Not sure if this is how bruinbrood taste but will soon let my colleague try. Before i ventured into adding malty syrup, i came upon VEDA bread which used malt syrup to enhance the taste. It is also something very unique in taste. just wonder if this VEDA bread is actually dutch bruinbrood. Many said with malt syrup added, the dough might be too sticky to work on. true enough, the dough was indeed very sticky. Wonder if my next attempt i should cut down the water. but somehow i wish not to as my final loaf is very soft, moist and malty! This time round, i didn't use 100% wholemeal flour. about 50% ww and 50% white bread flour. Still using prefermentation. Used both molasses and malt syrup. If anyone is keen with my recipe, please let me know =). i will post it here.

 

henkverhaar's picture
henkverhaar

That looks very much like standard store-bought Dutch bruinbrood.

My hearth bread recipe is nothing really special - it is a 'hybrid sourdough / yeast (IDY)' bread based on the recipe in Peter Reinhart's Artisan Bread Every Day. It uses a sourdough preferment (biga-style, I'd say) and a yeast/biga final dough:

Preferment:

90 grams of a wet sourdough culture (I figure it is about 100% hydration; based on Ed Wood's Camaldoli strain)
280 g bread flour (mine is an unbleached flour from a local mill)
180 g water
teaspoon dark malt powder

mix ingredients until all flower is _just_ hydrated, and put away, in the fridge if you won't need it for a couple of days, at slightly below ambient if you will use it in 24 hours. If your sourdough culture is active, it will be overfermented when you use it...

Final dough

All of the preferment
350 g bread flour
350 g whole wheat flour (from the same mill...)
15 g salt
2 tablespoons sugar (unrefined cane sugar)
1/4 teaspoon ascorbic acid (vitamin C)
about 2 tablespoons olive oil
1.5 teaspoon IDY (I really should weight it out one day).

Combine biga and water in your mixer (I use a DLX so start with the wet components) and mix. Add all of the white flour and approx. half of the whole wheat flour, in stages but quickly, and mix until hydrated. Set aside for 20-30 minutes.
Restart the mixer and add the oil, salt, ascorbic acid, sugar, yeast, and the rest of the whole wheat flour, in that order (or any other order that ensures that salt and yeast do not encounter one another in concentrated form), and mix until you get a well-developed slightly tacky elastic dough. Put away at slighly elevated temperature - I put it in my oven with only the light on (provides ample heat to get the oven to ca 25 degrees C), in a bowl covered with cling film - and leave until 'doubled in size' (FWIW). Take it out, knead, divide in individual loaf amounts, shape, and put em in prepared bannetons - in the meantime preheat oven to 230 degrees C, with baking stones in place. Put the bannetons away, covered (I use parchment paper for this), and leave until the dough has proofed sufficiently. Empty the bannetons on floured peels (I use corn flour for this) and shoot the loaves into the oven, onto the baking stones, which should preferably be at least 220 degrees C by this time; bake for ca 45 minutes, until centre of loaf has reached a temperature of 95 degrees C. Take them out of the oven and place on a wire rack to cool. Switch off oven (don't ask...)

En klaar is Kees.

 

henkverhaar's picture
henkverhaar

Oops. Forgot to include the water in the final dough recipe - it requires an additional 475 g water, in addition to the water already included in the biga...

sunhana's picture
sunhana

Wow...sound interesting to give your recipe a try. but in Singapore it is almost impossible to get malt powder. Is your malt powder diastatic? I read up that it helps to improve the fermentation process. I can only get malt syrup which is not diastatic. wonder if it will work if i substitute with malt syrup. ascorbic acid is added as a dough improver right? hahaha i don't have that too. in singapore, bread making is still not very common. but will definitely try out your recipe as it sure looks promising =). btw, does this recipe get a sour tasting bread? Or should i control the prefermentation so that it doesn't develop sourness too much?

henkverhaar's picture
henkverhaar

No, the malt powder is not diastatic, it's just fairly dark (burnt) malt flour - and it's not enough to significantly color the final bread. It will provide 'some' easily accessible sugar for the sourdough culture in the biga to start off from, but that could easily be provided by some sugar too - and it's more in there as an incantation than anything else. I doubt if it would make any noticeable difference if I left it out alltogether... Malt syrup would serve the same purpose. The ascorbic acid is a dough improver (gluten development regulator), and again is not strictly necessary. However, in a pinch you can use crushed vitamin C tablets (vitamin supplement) as a substitute. There's relatively little sourness to the bread, no doubt because it is a hybrid; the final dough doesn't ferment long enough for the LAB to generate sufficient lactic and acetic acid. The biga of course is sour - but that represents only about 1/4 of the overall dough.