The Fresh Loaf

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Hamelman's 80% detmolder Rye

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Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hamelman's 80% detmolder Rye

I wanted to bake a hearty Rye for many reasons. Firstly, to satisfy my Rye craving, and secondly to serve as a rye altus for further rye baking.

So, I have baked a 3-stage 80% Rye from Jeffery Hamelman’s book: BREAD, and it was high time that I bake it in my Pullman pan lookalike. The recipe calls for medium rye, and since I didn’t have any, I sifted my organic store bought Whole Rye flour. The sifting resulted in almost medium rye flour, and so I added back some of the bran to emulate medium Rye flour consistency.

I had thought that 3 stage detmolder Rye is time consuming,  precise , and daunting  to make. Now that I made it for the 3rd time, I have attuned myself to it’s schedule. It it really simple to make if you plan ahead.

After 36 hours of being wrapped in linnen, here it is:

Wonderful aroma, and flavor. Sweet, and sour, earthy and moist... very satisfying!

- Khalid

Comments

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

I can almost smell it from here!

Fantastic crumb!

Juergen

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks! Very typical german rye this one, Juergen.

The aroma is very sweet.

-Khalid

ananda's picture
ananda

Love it Khalid, absolutely love it!   Using a more complex fermentation process for these types of breads makes them very special indeed.   I can never make enough for my Markets; they always sell out

All good wishes

Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

It is very special, and i love it.

Thanks alot my friend.

-Khalid

evonlim's picture
evonlim

classic serious bread for rye lovers. me!!  thank you for sharing. 

it is a huge beautiful loaf.. enjoy. i would love to have a slice if i could!! 

evon

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks Evon:)

Make it, that is how you can have a slice! Medium Rye makes a world of difference to the dough structure. If you don't have it, make it. Sift the whole rye flour through  a fine screen ( i use an multi size oil splatter screen).

-Khalid

108 breads's picture
108 breads

Wish you could put samples on this forum so we could all have a bite or two. Guess we have to wait for 3D printers. :)

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hehe.! What is the fun in that, you'll miss out on so many other aspects. The aroma is simply too sweet to miss.

Please do make it.

-Khalid

Donkey_hot's picture
Donkey_hot

This is one of our favorite ryes.   Try it as a large boule - the crust is just irresistible.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I Have tried it with a boule, and it was excellent. I don't believe the crust benefited much as opposed to the pan loaf. This is akind of bread that does not benefit much from a crust development, it will be too thick and chewy.

-Khalid

Donkey_hot's picture
Donkey_hot

I'll show you the pics as soon as I figure out how to attach them here... the crust wasn't  much different from any usual ryes we bake, but of course, in my family the crust is a beautiful thing. :)   Seriously.  First goes the crust then the rest of the bread. :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

baking Khalid.  We like the 3 stage detmolder too.  This is one healthy, fine looking and tasty bread.  Love the rise, color,  crust and crumb - all first rate as usual.  Wouldn't expect anything less.  I like it when I post you on my blog that I am looking forward to your next bake and then go to new content and here it is.  Lucy and I will expect that from now on:-) Doesn't it just smell great when its baking?   The smell is the second best part besides the eating of course!

Happy baking Khalid

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I agree with you, DA! the aroma just gets better as the loaf ages! what a gorgeous recipe. I have been baking frequently lately, and my back is starting to complain. Have to take a pause now.

Thanks alot, DA for your kind words.

-khalid

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

That's a very open crumb for an 80% rye bread; and no signs of overproofing, either.  Lovely coloring, too, which I'm sure makes for some very good flavor.

Well done!

Paul

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, Paul!

Had i used whole Rye flour instead, the result would be very different. Medium rye dough acts more like a dough, and less like a clay. The 3 stage souring also helps alot strengthen the Rye dough. Amazing recipe!

Your encouragement is always much appreciated, Paul.

-Khalid

isand66's picture
isand66

Looks perfect Khalid.  I like the look of yours much more than the one made last month.  I will have to give this one a shot again soon and hope I can get it to come out as nice as your beautiful looking loaf.

Regards,
Ian

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Oh Please do, Ian.. this is one loaf i'll always come back to. Make sure to use a medium rye, or if you don't then you can make it (see my reply to evon above).

Awaiting your next loaf.

Thanks, Ian!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Nice job on a delicious bread.

I've not made this bread in a pullman pan, but your loaf inspires me to give it a try. The pan loaf form is actually better than a boule for the ways we eat this bread - mostly as open-faced sandwiches. It is also more suitable for sharing than cutting a boule in quarters, exposing more crumb to the air.

David

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Interesting. What would happen to a rye crumb when exposed to air? you mean dry out?

I actually bought this pan specifically for high percentage rye breads.

Thanks David, and looking forward to your version.

-Khalid

 

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Khalid,

That is one terrific looking 80% rye loaf my friend! I know if it was mine not a single scrap of it would get saved for altus, it's too tasty looking. The gorgeous crumb and high profile make this a great rye bread.

Franko

 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Yes, but since i don't bake rye regularly, part of this has to be save for later (Rye flour isn't cheap here, mostly organic and imported).

Thanks alot my friend.

-Khalid

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Khalid,

Boy, you are sure baking a lot lately!  I almost missed this one.  Seems like a lot of people are posting and I do end up not being able to keep up.

This is a beautiful rye loaf. I love how much it rose and the shape when using a pullman pan.  I will have to remember that next time I do a large rye loaf.

I made a rye with the 3 stage build last week too.  I found that the timing doesn't work well with my usual baking schedule and I really couldn't see that much of a difference with the 2 stage build I usually do that I got out of  Stan's book.  That one is easier to fit into my baking routine so it was nice to see that there isn't a significant difference between the two.  Have you ever tried it?  I am curious if you can tell a difference between the 2 with the flours you use.

How did your parents like this one or did it get eaten by you, your wife and the kids?

Thanks for the post.

Take Care,

Janet

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, Janet!

I don't have stan's book, so i can't tell the difference between 2 stage and 3. I believe that stage 1 could be omitted, as it is a very small build (essentially a refreshment of the rye starter), given that your rye starter is very active. So, yes, given the fact above, it can be done in two stages.

I have been baking very enthusiastically lately, i have to slow down now :)

Best wishes to you,

-khalid

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Khalid,
What a beauty and that must have been a  l-o-o-o-n-g  36-hour wait to slice.
You are baking some really amazing breads - great job!
:^) breadsong

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I didn't have to wait for 36 hours to slice this bread, i infact have baked a smaller one with the pullman pan (leftover from the 1100g dough), and i sliced it next day.

-Khalid

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Khalid,
Glad to hear you didn't have to wait so long. It's the aroma of the cooling bread I find so hard to get over, when waiting to slice.
Sometimes, when making larger batches/giving as gifts, I scale so there's a little extra - baking a 'tester' loaf in a small pan - to taste, and to see the interior, just to be sure the bread is good before it is given!
:^) breadsong

Mebake's picture
Mebake

It wasn't intended. I think i'll be doing a second dough from now on.

Khalid

Alpana's picture
Alpana

Wonderful bread again, Khalid! The crumb looks so inviting. 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thank you Alpana :)

-Khalid

varda's picture
varda

Hi Khalid.   Looks fantastic.   I have made this a couple of times, but felt daunted by the temperature controls.    Did you use a proofer?   -Varda

Mebake's picture
Mebake

No, i just went by the feel. what helps alot, is that my kitchen is 25-26 all year long, so i play with dough temperature by heating the water to 30c or so. 

Thanks Varda!

Lavanyashah's picture
Lavanyashah

Your bread looks fanatastic.  I have never made a 3 stage rye, but you have inspired me.  For the 'freshening' 1st stage, is a 100% hydration rye starter ok?  What was the total amount of your final dough?  Last, is your pullman pan about 16 x 4 inches?  I have a 3 liter rye pullman pan that I would like to bake in but don't know how much dough would be appropriate in it.

Thanks so much.  Lavanya

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hi, Lavanya

Thanks. Yes, i think so, an active 100% hydration rye starter is a good freshening.

The total amount of the final dough was arounf 1.5 kg, however, i only scaled 1.2 kg for the pullman-like pan. It is no pullman pan, mind you, it is a terrine pan. Sorry, i have no experience with true pullman pans, so i can't help you there. TFL members: ananda (andy), Varda (Varda) to name few, are ones who own pullman pans so you may ask them.

-Khalid

Lavanyashah's picture
Lavanyashah

THanks so much Khalid and Andy.  I appreciate the help.

Lavanya

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Khalid/Lavanya,

My Pullman Pan is by Chicago Steel, 3.25L capacity.   For this bread, scale @ 1.5 - 1.6kg

For 100% Rye bread scale @ 1.8 - 2 kg, depending on flour choice.

Best wishes

Andy

kenlklaser's picture
kenlklaser

I've been wondering how best to bake a larger amount of sourdough rye.  A bread pan.  Of course!

What did you use to sift your flour?  Is it called bolting cloth?  Or does it go by another name?  Seems like a handy thing, to be able to remove some to most of the bran (and germ?), perhaps replacing some of it!

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks, Kenlklaser

I used a splatter screen (a wide rimmed one). It is fine enough to sift out bran from Rye flour.

-Khalid

oksana's picture
oksana

Hello Khalid, Beautiful bread!!! im from Ukraine and this bread look like russian rye. I dont have the book so can you please post a recepie for this bread. I really want to bake this. And what the size of your pulman?

Thank you

 

 

 

 

 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hi, Oksana

I'd love to, if not for the infringement of copyright.

I can give you hints:

It is a 3 stage process, where the rye starter is fed with rye flour and water. The fed rye flour and water increases with every stage, and the temperature is different. amount of water for every stage is also different. It isn't as complex as it sounds, it only takes some time to plan ahead, and once you have that down, it is very easy to make.

I don't own a true pullman pan, only a smaller verison that looks like one. It fits 1.2 kg. of Rye dough, so a larger pullman can take more dough (1.5kg maybe).

-khalid