The Fresh Loaf

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Dark Russian Jewish Deli Rye with Porter, Onion, Sprouts and Aromatic Seeds.

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Dark Russian Jewish Deli Rye with Porter, Onion, Sprouts and Aromatic Seeds.

My apprentice, Lucy, has been on a quest to make some rye breads that really pack the flavor of what she thinks a rye should taste like.  Her last bake really came out well with a 40% rye and I thought for sure she wouldn’t try to improve on it any time soon but, she fooled me again.

 

Her reasoning this time was that how can she call a bread, rye bread, when only 30% to 40% of the flour is rye?  To her, this is a white bread with twice as much wheat flour in it as rye that it should be called 60 to 70% wheat bread instead.  So she wanted to rectify this by having at least 50% whole rye flour in the mix.

 

She also wanted to get the whole grains over 60% while keeping some coarse grounds corn in the mix.  The hydration ended up at 85%.   Lucy recently found out that part of my wife’s family came from Odessa, Russia and they love dark rye breads there.  So she used a dark Russian Baltika Porter for the majority of the liquid.

 

To get the bread leaning more to the dark side she used some barley malt syrup, molasses, instant coffee and cocoa to bring out the color.  She put in some Toadies, oats, potato flakes and 6 grain cereal to help round out and deepen the flavor.  We loved the Eric Hanner dried minced onion inclusion in the last bake so much that we took his tip to use the soaker water from them this time too.

 

Lucy put the usual red and white malts and little VWG to boost the white unbleached  AP and bread flour’s gluten content since these are bin flours from Winco and not much over 10% protein.  The aromatic seeds are the usual caraway, fennel, anise and fennel with the emphasis on caraway.  This time she used 100 dry grams of wheat berries that she soaked for 3 hours before sprouting them for an additional 25 hours until they chitted.

 

Unglazed crust.

Rather tan baking this as a free form loaf in the MagnaWare Turkey Roaster, she decided to proof and bake this in the small enameled, cast iron DO and bake it to 200 F.  We used our usual levain build for the rye sour but this time only used 10 g of seed.  It was built over 3 stages of 4 hours each but it was refrigerated after the 3rd feeding overnight to develop the sour.

 

Glazed Crust

When the levain came out of the fridge the next morning for its 3rd 4 hour build we started the autolyse with all the dry except the salt, sprouts and seeds along with the dough porter and onion water liquid.  After 4 hours the salt went in with the levain and we did 10 minutes of slap and folds and 3 sets of S&F on 15 minute intervals.

 

The seeds, sprouts and re-hydrated onions went in on the first S&F and were evenly distributed by the 3rd set.   After resting for 1 hour we shaped the dough and placed it in an oil sprayed DO and put it in the fridge for a 15 hour cold retard. 

 

By the next morning it had doubled and we allowed it to warm up on the counter for an hour.  We fired up Big Old Betsy to 450 F and after she came to temperature we allowed the top and bottom stone to come up to the same temp 15 minutes later.  We T-Rex slashed the dough and placed it, lid on, in the oven for 17 minutes of steam.  We then took off the lid and turned down the oven to 425 F, convection this time and continued to bake for 8 minutes.  At this point we took the bread out of the DO and it tested 129 F on the inside.

 

We continued to bake the bread on the oven rack between the stones for an additional 20 minutes until it read 200 F.  At that point we turned off the oven but left the bread in it until it reached 202 F 5 minutes later.  Total baking time was 50 minutes.  We removed the bread to the cooling rack ad glazed it with a corn starch glaze to make it shine.

 

It didn’t spring much but didn’t fall either and was at or near 100% proof.  The bread baked up dark brown and very crusty as was expected.  We hope the corn starch glaze and the 24 hour’s it will be wrapped in a cotton towel will soften the crust.  If it tastes half as good as it smells, Lucy has another winner on her paws.   Will have to wait to cut it and get a peek at the crumb so will get back to this post then.

 

We were not disappointed with the crumb.  Open, moist, soft, tasty; plain, tosted or as a sandwich This delicious sammy was an Irish Swiss and home grown tomato grilled cheese.  This bread is every bit as good as Lucy'e 40% Jewish Deli Rye adn this one is darker, mysterious, full of flavor and lovey to eat.  I didnlt thin that Lucy woulf do another Rye so soon but I am glad she did.  Now I Have to talk her into a Tzitzel so Varda di=oesnlt think we have forgotten the quest entirely:-)

Formula

Rye Sour Levain

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

RyeSD Starter

10

0

0

10

1.80%

Dark Whole Rye

30

30

30

90

16.16%

Water

30

30

0

60

10.77%

Total

70

60

30

160

28.77%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

95

17.06%

 

 

 

Water

65

11.67%

 

 

 

Hydration

68.42%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

13.04%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Dark Rye

189

33.93%

 

 

 

Whole Oat

10

1.80%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

10

1.80%

 

 

 

6 Grain Ceral

10

1.80%

 

 

 

Coarse Yellow Corn Grits

20

3.59%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

164

29.44%

 

 

 

AP

59

10.59%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

462

82.94%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

1.97%

 

 

 

Baltika Porter 349, Onion Water 73

422

75.76%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

91.34%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

557

100.00%

 

 

 

Baltika 349, Onion Water 73, Water 65

487

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

87.43%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

62.84%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

85.10%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,241

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Toadies

12

2.15%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

6

1.08%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

3

0.54%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

6

1.08%

 

 

 

Dried Minced Onion

5

0.90%

 

 

 

Instant Coffee, Cocoa

10

1.80%

 

 

 

Total

74

13.29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bread Spices

 

%

 

 

 

Anise, Coriander, Fennel

8

1.44%

 

 

 

Caraway

4

0.72%

 

 

 

Total

12

2.15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight of re-hydrated dried onions was 42 g.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Rye Berries

100

17.95%

 

 

 

Total Flour Soaker

100

17.95%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight for rye berries is the dry weight.

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

The content list is huge..bet the flavor will be too :)  What a dark and fragrant loaf. I can see a nice mild creamy cheese like a Boursin with this..something that won't compete but will be a nice topping. You continue to amaze and inspire. c

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

back to her long list of stuff in a complex bread.  When we cut it this after noon, we hope the flavor really comes through - it sure smells good and the crust softened up overnight as we expected.

We used to distribute Boursin all over the country.  I had an inside joke - for a fine tasting spreadable cheese, we had more go out of code date than we sold - thus the very high price was needed to cover the loss of half the product ! If you ask me Boursin goes well on anything you can spread it on,

Stay tuned for the crumb shot and taste description.

Alpana's picture
Alpana

Simply love the dark colour with the sheen. Waiting to see the crumb and your verdict on how the baltika porter fared in this multi starrer. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

porter before and the taste, like most beers in bread, disappears but the color remains.  With this bread doubling in volume in the fridge and then rising even more as it warmed up in the morning we expect the crumb to be fairly open even without any YW in the mix to open the crumb on heavy breads.

Stay tuned for the crumb shot later this afternoon.    

theresasc's picture
theresasc

I can just imagine the aroma from baking that beauty.  Your pantry sounds like a very interesting place, that is an amazing list of ingedients.

Theresa

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

in the Architecture field of 'Less is More' where the ornament of the builds was replaced with...nothing.  Many famous Architects embraced this idea but Frank Loyd Wright was not one of them.  He said and I am paraphrasing, the only time that less is more is when there is no more.  Frank was famous for his Organic Architecture that was elaborately ornamented with inspiration and materials from nature,  He is my favorite American Architect by far and my apprentice's bread recipes reflect her training that less.... is just less :-) 

Not everything fits in the pantry and we have bread ingredients stuffed into every nook in cranny in the kitchen.

I'm guessing the depth of flavor that this bread should reflect that - more ...is more!

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Nice one, DA! Lucy paid good homage to jewish Rye.. with twists of her own :P

:-)

Very bold bake.. i'am expecting a very flavorful crumb.

-khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

explode with flavor, I'm going eat the DO :-

Russian Jews were different than others in Europe in that they ate darker breads on a regular basis.  I'm not sure it this is because there weren't lighter breads available, Russians just preferred darker breads or that they were too poor to eat the best bread. Jews in Russian certainly were not as well off aas those in Europe. The aristocracy and royals in Russia ate white bread like their counterparts to the West and could easily afford it.  My wife's 'Uncle Ben' from Odessa died at 104 - a few short years ago.  I never asked him about this since bread was not important at the time but, he had written his own autobiography.  So the the things he thought were important were preserved.  

I'm guessing uncle Ben would like thsi bread very much !

Happy baking Khalid

isand66's picture
isand66

My Mother's side of the family all came from Russia in the early 1900's.  I was too young to be into bread when my grandparents were alive so I never got to ask them much about the local cuisine.

I have to say this bake looks fantastic.  I love your list of ingredients and it's something I know I would enjoy.

I'm sure the crumb and the taste will live up to the outside beauty.

I have been swamped at work and had no time to bake this week.  I'm finishing off my frozen bread so I have to make something soon!

Cheers,

Ian

evonlim's picture
evonlim

scrolling down, down n down... you hit the record of long list of ingredients! got me a little dizzy and amazed. what a huge combination. color came out dark brown shiny on the crust. like a slow roasted smoked pork butt! must be fuming with layers of aroma ... tell me more

can't wait to see the crumb as usual you kept us waiting eagerly.

evon

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

we will cut it and see how open the crumb is.  I know it would have been better if I had let it bake another 5 minutes in the DO before dumping it out on the top and smooshing (should be a real bread baking term) the crown it had made in the steam down flat :-)  That corn starch glaze really puts th shine on the crust.  We have been going for flavor recently and expect this one to be a better Jewish rye than the last taste wise.  Then we will get bake to Varda's Tzitzel quest.

Happy baking Evon - your recent ones show a real flair of the unexpected ingredients too!

evonlim's picture
evonlim

fantastic open crumb.. even your pictures have improved. both have done justice to all effort thrown in, and i am enjoying  looking at the crumb searching for the add ins.. well distributed. spongy texture, lightly toast and bite into it! oh yeah!! 

evon

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

munch on.  I thought for sure that the crumb would be as open as it is when we put YW in these heavier mixes. It proofed to near triple but the YW version is more open.  This bread tastes better though and it has a very nice soft chew too.  The crust is what I like the best though.  Very tasty and chewy.  It is a healthy bread made to pile meat on..... not that we ever do that.  Time to get the pastrami cure and smoke project back to the top of the list.  Glad you like the post Evon.

Happy baking

isand66's picture
isand66

That crumb and crust look like they hit the mark.  Pastrami and corned beef and brisket are screaming for a hug with your bread!