The Fresh Loaf

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50/50 whole wheat/flour bread

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MaximusTG's picture
MaximusTG

50/50 whole wheat/flour bread

For this bread I took 300 grams of whole wheat flour and mixed it with 300 grams of water and 1/8 tsp of instant yeast. 

That was at midnight. Next morning I added 280 grams of flour, 1 tsp salt, some pumpkinseeds and some flax seeds. Also enough water to make the hydration 75%. Gave it a stir and then kneaded with mixer. Let rise for 1,5 hours. Then shaped into boule. Proofed for 2 hours in banneton. Baked for 50 minutes at 190 celsius with steam.

 

300

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300

Comments

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Nice formula, and very good results! A Tablespoon of Honey will go a along way ,flavorwise.

Enjoy it while it lasts.

Hilde_Gard's picture
Hilde_Gard

I agree to Mebake. Very nice formula and the result looks awesome. I like to use some of the receipts of the german website http://chefkoch.de and have baked some very tasty bread the past couple of weeks

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Very nice loaf and a very nice and simple method to follow.  I really like your photos too.  Background colors really make the loaf stand out.

Janet

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

It's been a long while since I last posted on this website but I do try to check the posts every now and then to see if there is something that I  can learn from.  May I pls double check if you added any yeast to the  main dough or whether the 1/8 tsp spoon of yeast is all you used as it seems very little to me  (approx  1 grm maybe??) I understand  that time is the essence here but just wanted to make sure before I tried it out. Many thanks.

Judy

MaximusTG's picture
MaximusTG

To everyone: thanks for the nice comments!

To jyslouey:

Yes, 1/8 of a tsp is all the yeast that went into this bread. I don't know how much that would be in grams. I normally always weigh everything on a scale, but these small quantities don't measure well on a standard kitchen scale. 

Because the yeast is mixed with the whole wheat flour and water and is given 8 hours - that was how long it fermented. This allows the yeast to multiply while at the same time the whole wheat flour gets softer from the water and more flavour is extracted. 

Good luck!

 

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

I've never tried making 50/50 ww ( usually I just use 20/25%) in case it comes out too dense but with the overnight autolyse of the ww flour, it would work well and will def. give this recipe a try.

Judy

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

I've never tried making 50/50 ww ( usually I just use 20/25%) in case it comes out too dense but with the overnight autolyse of the ww flour, it would work well and will def. give this recipe a try.

Judy

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

follow.    Who knew bread could be so care free and easy!

Nice baking

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

for this  recipe.  I followed your recipe but reduced the qty of WW flour to 200 grms ww/200 grms bread flour.  I also added a tablespoon of maple syrup to the water for the ww sponge (I found out one-eight tsp is only slightly more than half a grm.  I also used a large tbsp of white starter when adding in the bread flour as I was not sure whether half a gram of yeast would be sufficient for the bread to rise.   The crumb of my first attempt was a bit sticky but still edible.  I used the same recipe again the second time, using 40% ww with flax seeds and sesame and the crumb was definitely a huge improvement this time.  I'll continue use this recipe as a basis for my future ww breads and experiment with other ingredients i.e. walnuts, raisins and figs.  Thank you again for sharing your recipe. 

Judy

 

 

 

MaximusTG's picture
MaximusTG

Nice to hear that Judy! I think your first attempt was maybe too wet, because the relative amount of ww was less then in my version. I used less flour than ww. And ww absorbs more water, so a version with 1:1 ww:flour should perhaps go down a bit in hydration. But it can always be a bit different in real world conditions due to differences in flour and ww flour used. 

Thanks for replying and I'll be looking forward to your blog posts about those nice breads with walnuts, raisins and figs ;).

Thomas

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

For my first attempt, I think the slightly gummy bottom was mainly due to my poor kneading and shaping. The dough itself wasn't too sticky but I baked the first loaf on a silpat silicone sheet whereas the next time I baked it in a cold dutch oven at a higher heat and the result was very good. 

Judy