The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Filled Rolls

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mcs's picture
mcs

Filled Rolls

Hey Everybody,
I'm in the process of getting ready for the Montana Farm and Ranch Show this weekend, so I thought I would show you some of the goodies I'll be baking for it.  This video, titled 'Filled Rolls' is sort of part 2 to the Potato Rolls video.  Hope you like it!

-Mark

PS Once again, if you'd like to see some of the other stuff I've been up to, this is the bakery FB page.




 

 

dakkar's picture
dakkar

Hi,  Now I have to do these too!  Except with a different stuffing.

Question.  Why did you pinch the dough after filling them?

Thanks!

mcs's picture
mcs

dakkar,I just pinched them so I could tell them apart afterwards.  Some people use food coloring dots to designate them, but I figured the pinching would work and would be pretty quick too. 
2 pinches = shredded beef
3 pinches = teriyaki chicken
4 pinches = shredded beef

-Mark

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Where did you get the boards and/or how did you make them(type of wood, finish, etc)?

Thanks.

mcs's picture
mcs

Since I know you like thorough answers, I think I'll head this one off at the pass :)

I bought a 5'x5' piece of 6mm Baltic Birch plywood for $20, cut it into 6 - 18" x 26" pieces, sanded them with 220 grit paper, oiled them with mineral oil, and lightly floured them.

They work very well, and oddly enough there happens to be a hardwood plywood supplier about 1/4 mile from where I'm living.

-Mark

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Thank you so much.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

win hands down. Just beautiful!  Thanks for posting the filling recipes :-)  Hey a man's got to make a living without having his secret filling recipes stolen right?  Nice baking and good luck with the farm and ranch show!

Happy  baking.

mcs's picture
mcs

It seems like every culture has some sort of bread filled with meat, doesn't it?  Since it's not really a pastie or bao or manapua, I figured I would just go generic and call them 'filled rolls'.

Thanks and hopefully I'll get some pictures to post from the show this weekend. 

-Mark

LindyD's picture
LindyD

It's always nice to see you work, Mark.  Your moveable feast looks like you can get a lot done with fewer steps.

The buns are scrumptious and am betting they'll be a big hit this weekend.  

Are you going to enter the trailer-backing contest, or too busy baking?  

mcs's picture
mcs

...enter the contest, but I'll just be too busy.  Actually if they have a contest for 'Person who takes longer than anyone else to get his trailer parked properly', I'd be sure to win that.  The truck + the trailer are a little bit larger than the Honda Civic that I'm used to driving, so it may be a while before I enter any of those contests.

Thanks for the compliments Lindy!

-Mark

Alpana's picture
Alpana

Not only are your shaping techniques serve as perfect "how to" for us learners, but even your videos are a great example of  excellent instructional videos. If you ever get time, you should post your tips for making videos to teach a process.

The rolls look yummy!

mcs's picture
mcs

I'm glad you like the videos so much. Here are a couple of my tips.

1.  While I'm making videos, I think to myself,
"If someone else was here and they were watching me work, where would they stand to get the best view, and what questions would they ask?"  The camera views and angles are constantly changing, just as if you were there, you'd move from place to place to get a better look at what's going on.

2.  As you probably noticed, I try to give as much information visually as I can, rather than through a narrative, since many people watching the videos don't speak English as their first language - and that way it doesn't matter.  (setting the timer, weighing the filling, putting the dough in the proofer, covering it with plastic...)

3.  I don't narrate any of my videos as I'm working.  Partially it's because of point number 2, it's also because a 1 minute verbal explanation can often be summed up very quickly with a visual demonstration.  Also, as you'll see in other baking videos, as soon as the talking starts, the working slows or stops completely.  Doing a voice-over after not only eliminates this issue, but also makes it easy to re-do the voice-over without having to re-do the baking work.

4.  In my view, what helps people become better bakers is not only the understanding of what's going on but most importantly practice, practice, practice.  I try to repeat the most important issues several times from a few different angles, and if possible with different doughs.  That way bakers aren't left thinking, "Yeah, but what if I was using THIS type of dough."

Fun fact:  Ask the interns and they'll tell you this is also how I teach in person.  There's not a lot of standing around talking about baking - but I try to demonstrate a lot and set them up so they get as much practice as possible.

Hope that makes sense.

-Mark

Alpana's picture
Alpana

Thanks for your detailed reply, Mark. Couldn't have asked for more! 

And I am reading some accounts from your interns. All I can say is that I am fascinated. 

Hoping to see many more videos and yes, will practice, practice all I can :)

Breadandwine's picture
Breadandwine

Thanks for posting this - always good to see a craftsperson at work. I'm a great believer (and practioner!) of stuffed(ing) bread! 

Anything that's wrapped in a bread casing is enhanced, IMO. There is a whole family of filled breads from calzones, to pasties (I'm going to let that comment above slide! :) ), peirogis, pirotzkis, plus pies and the en croute method, made with a bread dough - and many more. And that's just the savoury ones!

Not just meat, either - as a vegan I use a great variety of fillings, my favourites being a stuffed mushroom and vegan haggis - both en croute - and curried lentil and potato pasties (and peirogis).

For dinner tonight I had curried lentil and cabbage pie - made with a soda bread crust. Just wonderful. (I'll post about it on here, later.)

Back to your video - I loved (and could never hope to emulate) the precision with which you made those rolls. It was a joy to watch!

Thanks again, Paul

mcs's picture
mcs

I'm looking forward to your curried lentil post.  Anytime you can make a hand-held-1-dish meal, I'm a fan.  As you mentioned, not only are there many varieties of fillings, there are just as many ways to vary the bread/dough that encases them.  Happy baking!

-Mark

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Hi Mark, I know you are busy getting ready for the show but later on when you have a minute could you tell me more about your lovely counters? I have read so many conflicting opinions about upkeep, etc. Have you got any kind of finish on yours? The trailer looks so perfect and I hope you sell out this weekend, A.

mcs's picture
mcs

They're just maple tops that I oil occasionally.   Every time I use it, I scrape it with a bench scraper and over time that keeps it pretty smooth.  When it gets dry, I rub in mineral oil or Boos block 'mystery oil' which is just a combination of different oils.  Some people like working with dough on wood surfaces because it provides some friction and holds flour better, but if you can't afford it or prefer stainless steel or formica, then that works too.

Thanks for the well wishes Annie.

-Mark

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Hi Mark, many thanks for the speedy reply. My son is finally going to build my little Nana house and I'm hoping to have at least some wooden counters, and maybe an area of marble for pastry making. I like the way wood helps grip the dough and I was happy to hear that the upkeep isn't too fussy. The budget is small so maybe I'm just dreaming...

Thanks again, and much success with your new venture, A.

grind's picture
grind

Hey Annie, not sure where you live but Ikea carries very resaonably priced beech and birch counter tops that are very similar to maple tops.

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Hi Grind, Thanks for the tip - there is an Ikea somewhere near Seattle and hopefully my son/builder will find time to take me there when we reach that stage, A.

M2's picture
M2

Hi Mark, just read this thread and I wish that you had a fantastic Montana Farm and Ranch Show!  (wish that there is similar kind of show in my area).

I love filled rolls, and filled rolls using your potato rolls recipe must be super delicious.  I purchase these kind of buns usually at the asian bakery, and I notice that they differentiate the buns by putting a bit of decoration on top of the bun, like a few seasame seeds (black or white), sliced almonds etc.  I'm sure you know about these options already.  Just in case when you're going to develop more filled rolls, you don't have to do 5, 6 or 7 pinches or a finger massage is needed after every bake!  (or a 10 pinches rolls could be a real hit)

I've tried making filled rolls myself but the problem is that when I pulled the dough to seal the bottom, I ended up having a dough heavy bottom with the filling stayed on the upper half of the roll.  Any suggestion to improve this situation?

Thanks!

Michelle

mcs's picture
mcs

I know a lot of the different bao have food coloring to differentiate between them, but I hadn't thought of using different toppings like sesame seeds on them.  I thought of putting a little bit of parmesan on some, and I might do something like that for the next batch.  I don't want to spend all day pinching the buns and then counting the pinches to make sure I'm selling the ones that I think I am.

The filled rolls were a big hit at the show, especially the shredded beef ones, followed closely by the kalua pig.

I think you must be pinching them more than I am if the filling is going to the top.  Just pinch barely as much as you need to to close it, then put it seam side down on the parchment.  I used to pinch them a lot, then seal it even more like I was shaping a roll, but it's not necessary.  Just do the minimum, and if the filling is pretty thick, it won't leak out because the weight of the roll will seal the seam completely.

Thanks for the idea and I hope all is well with you.

-Mark

M2's picture
M2

and thanks for the advice re: shaping.  I'll try to do the bare minimum next time. 

Thanks for all the teaching again!

Michelle