The Fresh Loaf

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White rye extraction rate

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flourdustedhazzn's picture
flourdustedhazzn

White rye extraction rate

Hi everyone,

I'm in the process of figuring out how to bake from a bread formula calling for dark rye. In this context "dark rye" refers specifically to what's left after the white rye flour — most of the endosperm — is extracted from whole rye by the miller. I live in an area where I can't seem to find this flour; I can buy something labeled "dark rye" easily enough, but it's just whole grain rye flour, not the byproduct of white rye production that the recipe calls for.

I'm going to try and approximate traditional dark rye by running whole rye flour through a sieve to extract the largest pieces of pericarp, then adding back in the appropriate amount of resulting high-extraction rye flour that got through the sieve. What I need to know to figure out the right amount is, what's the usual extraction rate for white rye? In other words, how many kilos of white rye does a miller get from 100 kilos of rye berries?

Thanks in advance!

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi flourdustedhazzn,

Table 20 is worth looking at if you check the link below.   But it gives ash, not extraction rates.   White Rye sits between 0.58 and 0.78%.   Note there is no standardisation in rye production as flour.

http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=gtqEWcA73BEC&pg=PA226&lpg=PA226&dq=white+rye+flour+extraction&source=bl&ots=HxDhbAPCwl&sig=PhdAa2ux2jdy7z4vXWEXRDd8...

Best wishes

Andy

flourdustedhazzn's picture
flourdustedhazzn

Hi Andy,

I don't know enough about the distribution of ash within a rye berry for that information to be of much use, but I do think you've pointed me in the right direction. On page 226 of the book you cited, it mentions various average extraction rates of rye flour in the United States and Canada (83% and 67%, respectively). I'm not entirely certain whether this refers to the amount of whole flour after the husks are removed or the amount of white flour left after selective milling, but if it's the latter then it's exactly the information I need.

Anyone out there able to confirm this?

Thanks!

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi,

Mini is spot-on below.   Ash equates to extraction rate in that sense.   True Dark Rye is not common in the UK, although some mills sell Wholemeal Rye which they market as "Dark"...a situation you seem to be describing as relevant to your circumstances.

Here, Shipton Mill offer Dark Rye as Type 1350 [1.35 ash], but it's actually just wholemeal rye.   Dark Rye has ash in excess of 1.75 as far as I'm aware.   But, note that Dark Rye is not popular in some quarters...I'm sure Hamelman states its limitations in his book.

White Rye is scarcely a marketable proposition for smaller mills given the low level of extraction rate achieved.   What do millers do with the portion removed?   How do they sell it to make any sort of return?   Surely this if nothing else demonstrates that Dark Rye really isn't finding favour with bakers of today?

Best wishes

Andy

flourdustedhazzn's picture
flourdustedhazzn

It's my understanding that the unextracted portion of rye flour is used mainly in animal fodder if it isn't sold for human consumption. This is probably what happens to most North American production, though in Germany and Eastern Europe it appears to remain a fairly important commodity for bakers. I could order dark rye from the States, but the shipping cost would be prohibitive.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

or bruised grain under feed suppliers.  Also try: Rye-pollard    where I found 15% protein. 

Also used by distilleries, got a brewer near you that you might be able to order through?

That's funny, the link looks different than what I'm seeing:

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I think if the whole rye flour has more protein grams per 100g (and more fiber grams) you can be sure you are getting more of the non-endosperm parts of the rye berry.  

The more prime endosperm in the rye flour the lower the protein grams, higher carbohydrate grams and lower fiber grams.   Set me straight.  

 

flourdustedhazzn's picture
flourdustedhazzn

That's definitely a good way to check to see which type of flour it is. Unfortunately, it confirms that what I have is actually whole rye and not dark rye.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

The protein levels here are 10% and 14% the higher being half the price of the other one yet has better flavour and is better food value. (go figure! the demand of the masses!)  The 14% is less available but also makes a great 100% loaf however the stuff ferments fast packed with lots of enzymes.  

My Austrian all purpose white rye gives me a 8 hour max time before it falls flat. (we are talking dough strength not yeast)  This 14% power flour goes flat in 4 hrs., 3 if I delay salt or use warm water.  Take into account that I value a long wet time on my dough to reduce the phytic acid in the outer berry layers, I'm stuck trying to slow it down and bake lower longer even after reaching inside temperature.  Raising hydration speeds up fermenting but slows browning and increases baking time.   I've had to add salt early, cut all my rise times when using my Favorite Formula, add more water and lengthen baking time.  (higher protein also absorbs more water.)  So how did I deal will extra hydration?  I added chia seeds.  They are little super water sucker-uppers giving it back slowly during baking.  This keeps my dough paste from being a batter. 

Warning...  with more true dark rye flour, fermenting times will shorten considerably.