The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sprouted Flour

  • Pin It
kazz_42's picture
kazz_42

Sprouted Flour

I have quite a few recipes that are sourdough and others and i have to switch to sprouted flour. I was wondering if i could use sprouted flour instead of regular whole wheat, would the recipes turn out the same. Has anyone tried this?

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Kazz,

Peter Reinhart has a recipe using sprouted 'grains' and it produces a really fine tasting loaf.  I am assuming that sprouted flour would work too though I would imagine that fermenting times and proofing times will be quicker due to the extra enzymes in the flour.  

As with all bread 'things' - experiment and see what happens :0)  Always something fun to learn.

Take Care,

Janet

kazz_42's picture
kazz_42

Hi janet thanks for helping i think i did see the recipe it does look like a nice loaf. I dont think it was sour dough, but i will just have to experiment like you said.

Kristen

Red5's picture
Red5

Sprouted Flour will produce a denser loaf than regular whole wheat would. You can use it, but it won't be the exact same result. 

kazz_42's picture
kazz_42

Why is it that it produces a dense loaf, does sprouting break down the gluten? maybe could i add vitamin C or some vital wheat gluten i wonder would that help with the dense issue.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Somewhere on this site a contributor, Debra Wink, explained why whole grains create denser loaves.  Had to do with how the bran in the flour interferes with the gluten development.  I am lously at remembering details....I just know it has to do with the bran particles.

I have not had to add gluten to that loaf but do have to watch it so it doesn't over ferment.  

You might like to do a search for txfarmer's blog pieces where she works with 100% ww.  Good info on kneading to get a nice soft dough.  I have great results following her method.

Janet

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

the amylase enzymes in sprouted flour break starches into soluble components (maltodextrins)  that can't gelatinize, that can't turn into the crumb that we know and love. You will observe a much slacker dough during fermentation and possibly a very moist and sticky crumb if the extent of amilosysis is excessive.