The Fresh Loaf

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Kaiser Rolls & Pate Fermentee

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Bluwberry's picture
Bluwberry

Kaiser Rolls & Pate Fermentee

I'm a "newbie" to baking, got Reinhart's "The Bread Baker's Apprentice" for 2012 Christmas gift which seems to be a great book for beginners.  Reinhart says '"You can keep this (Pate Fermentee) in the refrigerator for up to 3 days ...".  If you are not going to use it until 4 days should it be frozen in that first three day and then unfrozen, or just go the 4 days in the fridge?

I'm trying the recipe again for the third time, I liked what I got the first two times.  This time I added a 1/2 tspof diastatic powdered malt to the Pate.  Has anyone got any info on what to expect with this change?

Bluwberry

Comments

justinmc2's picture
justinmc2

Your kaiser rolls look great! I wouldn't worry too much about an extra day in the fridge. I went longer than suggested a couple of times with a poolish and didn't have any problems. It seems like more work to freeze and thaw than to make a whole new batch.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

There is a video of Norm Berg making kaiser Rolls the traditional way on YouTube somewhere if you want to try to shape them the way he did,  I shape mine like you do.   The malt powder should introduce some more enzymes to break the carbs down into sugars the yeast can eat.  Usually yeast can keep up pretty well but, what sugars they don't get around to eating should help the rolls be a little sweeter and possibly brown a little better.

Happy baking

Bluwberry's picture
Bluwberry

Hi,

 I appreciate your comment re my rolls.  

I have a question regarding "sugars the yeast can eat."  If the sugar is "eaten" why are the rolls likely to be sweeter?  I'm not questioning your comment, I am trying to understand the dynamics going on.  

I was not successful in finding Norm Berg's YouTube video.  I didn't have enough time to thoroughly search it out so I'm going try again and see what I can do.

I'm baking the Kaiser's again tomorrow, bringing the dough to my daughter in-law and rolling, proofing and baking at her house.  Excited about that!

Bluwberry

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

proteins and starches or carbs,  Enzymes break protein bonds so they are converted into sugars that the yeast can eat.  The more enzymes, the more sugars.  Yeast can only eat so much of these sugars when producing co2 to proof the dough.  Once it is proofed it has to be baked.  So there are extra sugars in dough that cause browning and make the dough sweeter than it would be ordinarily.  Long ferments to develop sour in bread mean the labs an yeast will need more food than usual. if they eat it all up then no browning resulting on pale bread.  Extra enzymes make sure this won't happen in long ferments. 

Bluwberry's picture
Bluwberry

Breakfast was a WOW!