The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Potato Rolls - video

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mcs's picture
mcs

Potato Rolls - video

OK TFLers,
I know it's been a long time, but here I am with a new video from the new bakery.  This is a pretty simple Potato Bread recipe of mine that I mix by hand and shape into rolls.  It's a decent high quality soft bread that makes tasty burger buns, dinner rolls, and also works well for filling with stuff like chicken teriyaki :)  I use an overnight bulk fermentation to add some flavor and keeping quality, plus I use the yellow/golden potatoes that add a buttery, smooth texture to it.

Enjoy the video, the recipe is at the end.

-Mark

http://SinclairsBakery.com

 

 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Magnifico!

Thanks. BTW, what brand of flour are you using here?

Thanks again.

mcs's picture
mcs

Wow, an Italian compliment!  Thanks.  I'm using Gold Medal Harvest King.

-Mark

LindyD's picture
LindyD

The rolls look great, Mark.   

Great to see you using your new kitchen; the setup sure looks efficient.

Thanks for the recipe!

Lindy

mcs's picture
mcs

Yes, it's quite efficient and nice to work in.

-Mark

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Thanks for posting it.

It's really nice to see you at work in your new bakery.

David

mcs's picture
mcs

I had a few requests for Potato Rolls, so I thought to myself, "Why not make a video while I'm making the rolls?"  And there you have it.  Glad you like it.

-Mark

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Really nice Mark...  the video, the rolls, the whole nine yards.

Jeff

mcs's picture
mcs

Thanks and I'm glad you like the video.  Happy Baking.

-Mark

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

You would have chunks of potato in those rolls, then?  I always rice my potatoes for bread or rolls.

mcs's picture
mcs

No, there's not any chunks in the finished product.  They get broken down a little when working with the dough, then they 'melt' (or whatever the proper term is) during the baking, so there are no chunks.

-Mark

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Thanks for the taking the time and sharing your formula and video.  Goregous rolls!

I especially love your new baking abode.  Everything looks so emmaculate including you : )  I do hope your taking time for you, now that things are coming together so wonderfully.    

Sylvia

mcs's picture
mcs

Glad you like the video, and yes things are coming together.  The people who got the rolls yesterday were really looking forward to trying them out, so that's always exciting too!

-Mark

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

and your narration and the new kitchen looks great!  I love seeing the hot rolls come out of the oven.  Played that over and over.  Ironic how such a great moment gets only a fraction of time.  Where's the smell-o-vision!  Web cam?  Thank you for making your video in our size, down-sizing and slowing things down for us kitchen baking peoples.  Appreciate that.  Always have.  Ever tempted to run the taters thru a french fry cutter for big batches?    Thanks!  

Mini

mcs's picture
mcs

Glad you like the video.  Could you tell that I was burning my fingers to get those hot rolls off the pan and on to the cooling rack?  Juuusssst for you guys.  I'll have to work on the webcam.  Great idea on the french fry cutter.  I always wanted an excuse to buy one of those things. 

-Mark

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

:)   Those are so perfect !! I always love to watch your shaping. I bet the fragrance was wonderful . I am glad that things are coming together for you. Spring is in the air..even in MT I bet and I hope the growth of your bakery is apace with the time of the year. c

mcs's picture
mcs

Thanks for the compliments on the buns and the shaping.  Yes, the rolls have a really nice smell to them as they are baking, and even long after they have cooled, they are quite fragrant when cut open.
-Mark

dakkar's picture
dakkar

Oups.  I shaped them before putting them in the fridge.

Should I reshape them a bit again or just straight to the oven?

How will it affect my proofing time?

Thanks!

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

That method was the first thing I thought about also. Why not just see what happens(ie, not re-shaping)? That is unless someone chimes in with a reason(s) not to do so(or vice versa).

My guess is the result will still be great, although it will be up to you to determine when the rolls will be ready to bake after removing them from the refrigerator(poke test, "puffiness" look, etc).

mcs's picture
mcs

Then if it works out nicely the way that you did it (shaping before it goes in the fridge), then you say, "I do it this way because I like the way...."  Dough behaves like dogs do, it can sense fear and as long as it thinks you know what you're doing, it's alright.
But seriously, with soft doughs I've found that a pre-shape before it goes in the fridge results in a tougher crust than I would like for a 'bun'.  With a non-enriched dough, it may be irrelevant and it's just a personal preference.

-Mark

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Good enough reason for me(not to preshape).

The next question, master, then why "divided but unshaped refrigeration" as oppsed to refrigeration"in bulk"?

Thanks.

mcs's picture
mcs

mrfrost,
It's just a surface area thing.  Bulk refrigeration is perfectly fine, but then the next day it makes it more difficult to divide (especially with a dough divider) since the enriched dough hardens up with the butter and whatnot.  Plus when they're scaled into little rolls, they warm up very quickly and evenly since they are multiple 95g blobs instead of one big 3.4kg blob.  Even if these were made into loaves, they'd still warm up more evenly as 680g blobs. 
FYI when I'm doing the same kind of thing with baguette dough (non-enriched of course), I bulk ferment the whole batch and divide it when it comes out of the fridge.  A higher hydration dough (my baguettes are 77% hydration) is easier to work with when it's cold.

-Mark

chouette22's picture
chouette22

...these rolls turn out in the video, how can we resist making them as well? I'll certainly give them a try, I bet they are super soft - exactly what my kids love in a breakfast roll. Now I just need to scale down the recipe to our needs. :)

mcs's picture
mcs

I hope you try them and both you and your kids love them!

-Mark

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

the starch seeps into the water from the cut potato where it thickens slightly as it boils.  It's only a little bit of starch but makes a big difference.  I suppose if you didn't have potato and had potato starch, a teaspoon or two of starch dissolved in cold water and heated would have a similar effect.  Would miss out on the potato in the dough, though.  I think that potato adds a lot of good taste and moisture itself.  

Some of the best baked potatoes I've ever had were washed in sea water.  I bet the potato dough would make a great laugenbrot.

-Mini

mcs's picture
mcs

That has now become your mission.   Use the potato dough for laugenbrot and report back to us.  And make sure to note any changes/modifications to the process, formula, and ingredients.  Go.

-Mark

PS Don't use anything in there that I can't find in the middle of Montana like 'sea water', OK?

dakkar's picture
dakkar

In the oven.  Will soon find out!

mcs's picture
mcs

Hope you enjoy them.

-Mark

rport's picture
rport

Thanks for sharing! I am looking forward to trying these.

mcs's picture
mcs

Try them out and of course let us all know if you make any modifications/additions to the process or recipe.

-Mark

proth5's picture
proth5

rolls.  Inspiring veiw of the bakery.

Pat

mcs's picture
mcs

Tasty rolls and the bakery is beginning to feel more comfortable.

-Mark

dakkar's picture
dakkar

Well, this is the final result!  Not sure what it's supposed to be, but I'm quite happy with it!

Will try the proper method next time to see if any difference, but they are sure light and fluffy!  And your right about the potato dissapearing.

Thanks for sharing this recipee and posting the video!

mcs's picture
mcs

And a great photo too.  They look quite cozy with each other :)

-Mark

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Thanks for uploading this great video, Mark!

Love your mini bakery setup.

Bring them on!

mcs's picture
mcs

Glad you enjoyed the video and Happy Baking to you!

-Mark

Alpana's picture
Alpana

One more beautiful & detailed video from you, Mark. Really appreciate all the videos you have posted.  I made this dough after watching your video, but had to rush somewhere and had no time to make rolls. So I increased water to make a wet & sticky dough, formed into a focaccia and retarted in fridge overnight. We had a wonderfully airy, soft and tasty focaccia for breakfast with EVOO, gouda & black pepper. Thanks for sharing this.

Alpana

mcs's picture
mcs

I'm glad you enjoyed the video and thanks for telling me about the changes you made to suit your schedule and tastes.  It's always interesting to hear about modifications bakers make to the timing, technique, or flavor.

-Mark

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Mark, at what temperature is your proofer set, for these rolls?

Just curious. Thanks.

mcs's picture
mcs

Here are all of the temperatures, since I thought you might be interested.

The proofer is set for around 82F. 

For the mix, the milk was 110F, the potato water and potatoes were 70F, the eggs were 40F, and the flour was 60F (the bakery temperature).  The dough temperature at the end of the mix was 80F.  This is what I usually try for.

The dough went in the proofer for the 30 min rest after 3 minutes of hand mixing.  After my 'final mix' for 1 min, the dough went back in the proofer.  When I did the stretch and fold, the dough was puffier than I wanted it to be, so for the following hour (before I divided it into rolls), I left it out at 'bakery temperature', 60F so the dough wouldn't be too sticky. 

On day 2, the bakery temperature was 58F, so when the dough came out of the fridge (34-37F), it went into the 82F proofer for 30 min before I shaped them into rolls.  After shaping they were in the proofer for exactly 90 min before they went in the oven.

Short question, long answer.

-Mark

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Thanks for answering all(I hope,) my questions. I almost certainly would have gotten around to all of those too, lol.

Thanks so much.

mcs's picture
mcs

I often times can't remember where I put my keys or my wallet, but for some reason I can remember all of those numbers, 5-6 days later, despite not writing any of them down.  Strange...

-Mark

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

One Third   recipe in grams...   (approx.  4 cup flour recipe)  

With refrigeration the sweetness in the potatoes comes out naturally that's why I lowered the sugar amount.  I needed 20g more potato water to make up for it.  

  • 580g  AP wheat flour
  • 45g   14g  sugar
  • 14g    salt
  • 4g      instant yeast
  • 195g   milk  
  • 135g   cooked potato
  • 60g     butter
  • 55g  or  1  egg
  • 50g  + 20g  potato water

1127g  total dough

mcs's picture
mcs

It's always good to see the personal adaptations people make to suit their fancy. Photos are always welcome too :)

-Mark

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

My idea is that with one batch of dough,  you can drop some into lye or baked-baking-soda-solution on the side for variety.  I am having a time with the crust, a little too soft right now but that doesn't keep us from eating it.   I do miss the diastatic malt that goes well with the pretzel flavor but I think diastatic malt with potato would get gummy and heavy.  Tomorrow after the overnight retardation, I plan on making some different shapes.  Ideas?  twists and such tumbling in my brain and the classic knot and pretzel shape too.  Gotta be easy and fast as well as tasting good.  I just put four out fast for dinner and yes, they could use more proofing.  Curious if I got the solution strong enough.   After 30 minutes of proofing, 5 minutes in the solution then after about 20 minutes I scored them and let them sit out for a while to expand.  Took 14 minutes to bake at 180°C  and brown on the bottoms too!    Those little bits in the crust came from 150g of fork smashed cooked chestnuts I added along the way.   I will get them sooner into the bath and ... hubby just said they don't have to be shiny... "good."

 

mcs's picture
mcs

Mini,
I hesitate to give any suggestions on anything like that, as I have absolutely no experience in that area.  But I'll definitely be paying attention to your experimenting, so be sure to take good notes.

-Mark

PeterS's picture
PeterS

5 mins seems like a long time. you can warm the alkali solution to 100F or so, too.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Simple twists, actualy a long two strand allowed to rest and then cut with the bench knife into lengths.   Two got brushed with the sodium carbonate solution.  Can you tell?  

Really makes 'em brown!  And no special time out in the schedule, just brush on for this extra effect!   

Mini  

mcs's picture
mcs

And using my super-duper reasoning skills, I'm going to guess that the two on the left are the ones you brushed with the solution.

-Mark

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

As you can see, does leave some light spots on the bottoms of the rolls, and because the cold solution did not have a gel setting effect, the skin remains soft so scoring tends to close as the rolls bake.  Brushing done before the rise, left open on the table during the rise with scoring done just before.   The lighter rolls were brushed with whole milk.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The hot 30 sec. dipped round rolls below I keep coming back to.  They are shaped coils, fat in the middle, like a short snake that swallowed an egg.  Then the small ends are tied and one tucked under.  Scoring after the dip in spiral direction from the dent in the "middle."  I don't have pretzel salt but would be a nice touch.  

I realize should post the solution here.  That would be 100g of baking soda, in a non-reactive pan, baked in the oven at 200°C for 30 min and allowed to cool.  Dissolved into 500ml cold clean water.  Be careful with the solution storing in plastic or glass.   Keep a bottle of 5% vinegar around to help cut the slimy feeling on hands etc. and when washing up to neutralize the solution.     

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Mark,

I almost missed this..... So many things get posted I can't always keep up but it is nice to know these don't go anywhere :-)

Your videos have always been some of my favorites because you cover so much yet keep it simple. This one is no exception. I envy your new baking space.  Looks really sleek, efficient and clean.  No wasted space!

Can you please explain why you switched from gently kneading the dough to a S&F at the end of your working the dough?

Take Care,

Janet

mcs's picture
mcs

Thanks for the compliments about this and the other videos.  I'm glad you enjoy them. 
As far as working with the dough, when I was initially kneading it after the 30 minute rest (2:20-2:50) although it gets smooth very quickly, it isn't quite as strong as it appears.  It still tears easily at that stage, and so for the next step to develop the strength without tearing the dough, I use a stretch and fold.  Then I gently boule it up without tearing (3:17-3-23).
I hope that makes sense.

-Mark

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Mark,

Yes it does and you have also put words to what I do and I didn't even realize that I was doing it though my first kneading is done with my DLX rather than doing it by hand as you do.    Guess what I do can be considered 'official' since you are a professional and do it too :-).  Amazing how much I do and don't even know I am doing it....just following the dough.

I appreciate your explanation!

Take Care,

Janet

 

ohhcrumbs's picture
ohhcrumbs

I can't wait to try these... Do you have a preference for the type of potato? Waxy? Floury?

Cheers!

mcs's picture
mcs

ohhcrumbs,
I've used Yukon Gold and Idaho Gold potatoes with these rolls and the flesh of them gives the bread a very nice golden and creamy texture.  I suppose any yellow potato that works well for making creamy mashed potatoes would be great for these.

-Mark

Faith in Virginia's picture
Faith in Virginia

Hay Mark, It took a while but I finely got around to making these rolls.  I did them up for Thanksgiving  and they turned out beautiful.  I needed to add a bit more water and adjusted baking times for my oven but that is understandable.  It also gave me an opportunity to use my dough  divider. :-)  Great taste and texture, Thanks for sharing.

Faith

 

 

 

mcs's picture
mcs

I had quite a few Potato Rolls orders for Thanksgiving, so you weren't the only one eating them on that day.  Glad to hear that you enjoyed them!

-Mark

Majed's picture
Majed

I am a new member and thought i'd introduce myself with a visual. I have been experimenting with so many recipes and variations and I must say this one is among the top. Here is a pic of the rolls right after baking and brushed with butter. One problem though, the rolls tend to have dark spots here and there and I don't know what went wrong. Maybe the creator of the recipe can help. 

Thanks

http://tinypic.com/r/2e0ij4m/5

http://tinypic.com/r/2ilocrd/5

 

 

mcs's picture
mcs

Nice job shaping your rolls, Majed.  The spots are just places where there were chunks of potato; it tends to bake a little darker there.  Nothing went wrong.  I've noticed that when the potatoes are blended into the dough very well, then there tend to be less dark spots.  One other thing, because your rolls are baked lightly, it is easier to see the spots.  Try increasing the baking temperature to between 350F-375F (177C-191C).  They should take between 14-16 minutes to bake.

Hope this helps.

-Mark

Majed's picture
Majed

Very happy to read your positive comment.

The rolls were baked in a newly bought in-store convection oven. The problem is the oven comes with two high speed fans (no option for high and low, just one high speed mode). Tried to bake at 325F for 16 minutes as instructed in your video and ended up with burned rolls. The ones you see in the picture were baked at 300F for 12 minutes. Maybe i little longer next time. 

I would love to try other hamburger bun recipes if you are willing to share though.

Majed

mcs's picture
mcs

...you did the right thing by lowering the temperature to 300F.  That sounds like the right temperature for your oven, maybe just a few more minutes to develop the color.  Of course the trick in baking in a new oven is to figure out the timing you need to get the bread to the color you want and the inside to the temperature you want, both at the same time. 

BTW, this potato rolls recipe is the main recipe that I use for hamburger buns.

-Mark

Majed's picture
Majed

Alright, just baked a second batch @300F for 15 minutes. I also managed to get a flatter shape by letting rolls proof a bit longer. However, I don't notice the flavor of potatoes!!! Should i switch to flakes? what is the maximum potatoes to flour ratio I could go for?

http://tinypic.com/r/veoklc/5

http://tinypic.com/r/apd5xz/5

http://tinypic.com/r/t9b6md/5