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Two Way 75% White Bread - DaPumperized with Scald and Seeds

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Two Way 75% White Bread - DaPumperized with Scald and Seeds

My apprentice says that sane German bakers don’t usually try to do a pumpernickel style bake of; slowly reducing low temperatures over a long baking time, when baking white bread of any kind.  But, I figured that if professional bakers can call a bread with only 25% to 30% of rye flour in it a rye bread, then we should be able to DaPumperize a white bread too.  

I have to admit this is about the whitest bread we would usually make, but thankfully, only my apprentice is a German baker and she doesn't count when it comes to new and exciting things, bread wise, around here most always.  Now, if the bake goes horribly wrong, then it is all her fault - I mean she is only an apprentice.  She also looks ridiculous in that full body hair net when she bakes anyway.  So who could take what she says seriously looking like that?

  

We had to break the recent trend of 100% whole grain bakes or risk falling into the dark abyss.  Even though the dark side breads are fantastic and tempting, being stuck there forever is a little much if you aren’t a German bread baker,

  

We do like breads in the 25% - 30% whole grain range and they make fine sandwich breads.  Sandwiches, as some might know, are right up there with home made amber lager beer, as far as, my apprentice’s way of thinking goes - which admittedly isn't very far or even deep for that matter.

  

So, mainly out of boredom with a touch of insanity and a touch of spite, I decided to try to DaPuperize a white bread and see if the tremendous boost in flavor this technique usually provides would work with white bread too.  It was worth a shot even though a long one – otherwise you would think people would be doing it all the time as a matter of course – but they don’t.  Maybe it’s the 6 hour bake time that puts them off?

 

To give the bread a chance at being decent, we included bread spice seeds and the other usual other seeds we have recently been using, to give this bread a chance the bread at some depth and chew like our whole grain breads we DaPumperize.

Since this bake was planned to be 80% wheat we decided to use our new Not Mini’s Ancient WW starter ( a very powerful one)  to go along with a WW Yeast Water one and make separate levains.   All 25% of the whole grains are in the levains and are made up of a mix of WW, rye and spelt.

We upped the whole grains some using 100 g of wheat berries for the scald along with the Toadies and home made red and white malts.  We dropped the molasses and barley malt syrup for this bake. For much of the dough water we used the excess scald water. Aromatic seeds were the usual coriander, fennel, anise and bi-color caraway that we buzzed up a little after roasting this time.   The meaty seeds were also roasted and they included; black and white sesame seeds, cracked flax and 50 g each f pumpkin and sunflower seeds.

We followed usual routine of late by building the levains over 3 stages with the Not Mini’s Ancient WW one doubling every 3 hours from the first build on while the YW one took 4 hours. For the last build – its best showing.  We autolysed the dough flours, salt, malts and Toadies  for 3 hours before adding in the levains. 

10 minutes of Slap and folds followed when the slack dough really came around on the gluten development side.  After a 20 minute rest we stretched out the dough to do an envelope fold and dropped all the seeds and scald onto it and folded it up with a few S&F’s.   We did 2 more S&F’s on 20 minute intervals to further develop the gluten and to distribute the add in seeds thoroughly.

After a 30 minute rest we took half the dough and shaped it into a loaf and placed it into a large loaf tin, filling it less than half full and covering it with plastic.  The other half of the dough was left in the oiled and plastic covered bowl. Both were then refrigerated for 8 hours overnight.  They didn't expand much in the fridge.

In the morning, both were placed on a heating pad, covered with a cloth and allowed to warm up for 1 1/2 hours.  The bulk retarded dough was them shaped and placed into a basket for final proof on the heating pad with the tinned loaf.

After another 2 hours the tinned loaf was 1/2” under the rim.  We covered it with aluminum foil and placed it into the preheated 375 F mini oven for its 6 hour baking schedule where the bottom of the broiler pan was full of water to provide extra steam.    We didn't put any oat bran or poppy seeds on the top of the loaf because we wanted to see how dark a white DaPumpernickel could get in 6 hours.  The baking schedule follows:

375 F - 30 minutes

350 F - 30 minutes

325 F - 1 hour

300 F - 1 hour

275 F - 1 hour

250 F - 1 hour

225 F - 1 hour

For some extra thrill for my apprentice and a comparison baseline for me, we decided to bake the other half; the boule, as one would expect a loaf like this to be baked - just in case the DaPumpernickeled half was a total failure.

We decided to bake it in a hot DO but it took another hour and a half before we thought that it was ready for the oven.  After a poor slash job and lowering into the DO with a parchment sling, this boule was baked at 450 F for 20 minutes with the lid on and another 5 minutes with the lid off at 425 F convection before removing it from the DO and placing it on the lower stone to finish baking - another 10 minutes – 35 minutes total baking time.

We then turned the oven off and left the bread on the stone with the oven door ajar for 5 minutes to help crisp the crust.  The boule baked up nice and brown, blistered and the crust was crispy before went chewy as it cooled.  It smells terrific.

The loaf is now through with its slow and low bake and hit exactly 210 F at the end of 6 hours in the mini oven.  We will slice into this loaf after it has rested for 40 hours. Luckily we have tasted the boule and it is a fantastic loaf of bread.  The crumb is so soft and shreddable, glossy and open like it had butter, eggs and and cream in it - just delicious!   This bread cannot be sliced thin and 1/2" thick, or maybe a little more is its sweet spot. This is another bread could eat every day.  Already ate a quarter of the boule!.Can't wait for the loaf to be ready to slice thin.  It will have to go a long way to be better than the boule.

We got 33 slices oiut of the 83/4" DaPumpernickel loaf.  It wasn't as dark as a black pumpernickel about a couple of shades darker than the other part of this two way bake.  The flavor wasn't as deep or rich as a 100% whole grain pumpernickel but it tastes totally different than the regular baked boule.  This tastes like half a pumpernickel and is much more powerful a taste than the boule.  We like this bread a lot too!  For those that don't like pumpernickel but want something stronger than a rye then this loaf  might be the one for you!

Formula

YW and Rye Sour Levain

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW SD Starter

20

0

0

20

2.47%

Dark Rye

0

25

0

25

5.00%

WW

0

0

50

50

10.00%

AP

50

0

0

50

10.00%

Water

50

50

10

110

22.00%

Spelt

0

25

0

25

5.00%

Total

120

100

60

280

56.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

310

62.00%

 

 

 

Water

230

46.00%

 

 

 

Hydration

74.19%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

31.69%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

500

100.00%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

500

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

13

1.60%

 

 

 

Water

400

80.00%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

80.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

810

 

 

 

 

Soaker Water 300 & Water

630

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

77.78%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

26.67%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

75.99%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,704

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.40669

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

3

0.60%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

3

0.60%

 

 

 

Toadies

20

4.00%

 

 

 

Bicolor; Sesame, Cracked Flax

13

2.60%

 

 

 

Pumpkin and Sunflower Seeds

100

20.00%

 

 

 

W&B Caraway, Anise, Coriander, Fennel

12

2.40%

 

 

 

Total

151

30.20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

 

 

WW Berries

100

20.00%

 

 

 

Total Scald

100

20.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weight of scald is pre scald weight

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

varda's picture
varda

Looks really nice DA.   I see you have cut it now.   How is the taste?   -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

than the loaf but if the loaf tastes better than the boule I will be stunned.  It is one of the best breads my apprentice has ever made.  It is just delicious.  I've never put bread spices in a white bread before but they sure make a big difference.  The rest of the seeds,including the hemp I haven't mentioned but thought Karin would smile over, all work together so well and give the bread a deep nutty flavor that is just outstanding.  I might up the whole grain some and add some pistachios  to make this my everyday bread if I had one.  The crumb is as soft as any enriched bread we have ever made.  I'm so glad we tried this experiment and hope the DaPumperized version doesn't disappoint!   I mean...how could it?  You would love this bread. 

Happy baking Varda.

isand66's picture
isand66

Please FED EX what's left of that bread to my China hotel...okay!

The boule looks great.  I could eat that whole loaf in one sitting.  What a great looking crumb and crust.

I can't wait to see how your slow baked one comes out.  By that time I should be in China and after eating the nauseating airplane food I may jump out of my hotel window after I see your photos!

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

make you give up brown bread!  I ate a quarter of it no problem.  When it is really good,  you just can't help yourself.  By Wednesday morning you might well be in China where this bread might be pretty scarce.  I'm not sure FEDEX could keep up with you!  It's all I can do to keep from peeking under the foil to see what color this DaPumperized loaf really is.  It sure smells great through the hole I made for the temperature probe.   Can't wait to slice into it and have a taste.  On Thursday China time, check out the update to this post!

Safe travels Ian

 

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

I was going to point out how dangerous a bread like this must be.  Then you fess up that you devoured 1/4 of the boule "no problem".  A bread like that would be problema grande for me:  I have been known to absentmindedly work my way through entire baguettes or bags of kettle chips without noticing the unbridled consumption in progress.  I look down and think, no...I couldn't have.  So I could do some real damage on a loaf that tastes and mouthfeels as good as that boule must.  Kind of makes me want to slow my progress as a baker -- if I ever get as good at this as you are dbm, I'll do myself in with gluttony.  While the man may have said too much of everything is just enough, the sensible alternative of everything in moderation becomes a challenge with baking like that. 

Love those add-ins.  Looking forward to experimenting with malts when I (ha!) have some time this summer.  Great plate and sunset (best yet - water!) pix!

 

Tom

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Wonderful bake, I have to admit you eat healthier than I, well done!

Cheers,

Wingnut

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

healthy as we can since we want to live forever :-)  Lot's of fruit and veggies,  some meat with as little animal fat as possible - mainly chicken and fish with a ton of salad and whole grain breads mostly.  Don't know if it works but the variety is tasty and we think we are healthier.... if you don't count the ribs, sausage and deserts......

Glad you like the bread and cross your fingers for that poor white loaf !

Happy baking Wing

Alpana's picture
Alpana

I have no difficulty in believing that this bread is addictive. What is the orange hue in the crumb close-up shot? 

This bread and the scenery in background  is what bliss must be defined as :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I took the crumb shots outside in the sunlight,  I included the indoor shot of the sandwich to contrast.  The real color is somewhere in between but this crumb does have some orangey, red stuff in it from the bloated wheat berries to the red malt and toadies.  Here is a picture of the autolyse flour on the bottom the Toadies on top of that the white malt on the toadies and the red malt on top.

We love living here with the citrus, flowers and lake - it's bliss for my apprentice and her life of leisure.  We have lived here for 25 years and would hate to move away.  Glad you liked the bread Alpana -Happy  Baking

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

looking crumb!  Well, it all came together great!  Looks so delicious with just the right chew and texture....I have to admit though.  You got me at 'full body hairnet'.  I'm still laughing!  

Sylvia

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

unlike Full Metal Jacket we will have to do a comedy called Full Body Hairnet so others can see how ridiculous she looks!  She thinks she is stylish in a counter top kitchen gadget sort of way.

For anyone who is a little seedy, this is their kind of bread.  It's really one of my favorites so will take it up to 50% whole grain and see if it tastes as good as this one.   We like this one a lot.

Glad you like it Sylvia and happy baking.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I can imagine the flavor, DA!

You are spoiled now, no doubt.

Lovely! i'd like to the see the long baked version.

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

this bread Khalid and the next bake will take it up to 50% whole grain flours.  This bread is all about soft crumb and great taste.  I took the DaPumperized version out of the pan last night at 11 PM, after an 8 hour rest. and wrapped it in a cotton towel for its 32 hour rest.  I took some pictures of the crust and will post them shortly for you.  It didn't come out as dark as the last one........ but it is a white DaPumpernickel :-)

Glad you liked the short baked version.

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

looks fantastic.
They bake a lot of German breads with falling temperatures (but not as long as Pumpernickel.) I found the crust of a bread baked at falling temperatures quite superior, crisp and thin.

For example:

10 minutes at 250 C/480 F,

10 minutes at 230 C/445 F,

10 minutes at 210 C/410 F,

10 minutes at 190 C/375 F,

15 - 20 minutes at 180 C/355 F

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

thin crust sounds like what you want on a baguette.  Would this be an alternative for the usual 500 F, steam for first 8 minutes for baguettes?

What sort of steam do you use for this schedule and what sort of breads is it used on?   Very interesting indeed? 

Only 30 minutes till loaf slicing time.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Baguettes? No, this is for whole grain breads that have longer baking times. The example I gave you above is of a German bread called "Herzbube" (Knight of Hearts), it's made with medium rye, some bread flour and walnuts. You use steam and remove the pan after 20 minutes.

But I also made a lovely traditional bread from the region of Paderborn, called "Paderborner", made with whole wheat, medium rye and some bread flour, baked for 60 minutes with falling temperatures  from 240 C in 15 degrees steps down to 210 C.

Herzbube - Knight of Hearts

Paderborner

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

info Karin.  Another baking process to try out on some whole grain breads.  I will check your blog on these breads.  Now I think my apprentice wants to DaPumperize; txfarmer's 36 hour baguettes and teketeke's Japanese YW White Sandwich bread.  She is incorrigible besides being a determined German!

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

These slow-bakes of yours are getting very tempting. Seriously.

Another great loaf, DA. Keep up the experiments---always makes for a good read. :)

Zita

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

DaPumperize a white bread Zita so you limited flour availability won't be an issue.  When you get around to doing a low and slow bake you, will get to taste and appreciate the unique flavor that this method imparts into bread - a taste and aroma that is quite unlike any other in the bread world.

Glad you liked it Zita - lookng forward to another piece of sculpture from you soon.