The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Got my new Kenwood Chef Titanium.

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pjaj's picture
pjaj

Got my new Kenwood Chef Titanium.

After 40+ years and two rebuilds my old Kenwood Chef Major A707 is just about to give up the ghost again. Spare parts are now almost impossible to find and my only other option was to have it completely refurbished by a company that completely strips, re-enammels and rebuilds old Kenwoods completely. However they always seem to be fully booked when  I visit their site and can't take on new work.

So I ordered a new Kenwood Chef Titanium KMM020 from John Lewis, and they price matched an offer I had found elsewhere - saved £200!

It arrived yeaterday and today I've baked 12 loaves - it worked perfectly, much quieter and no faint smell of electrical overheating.

One of my daughters is into retro gear, so I may try the refurbishers again sometime and give the old one to her.

Leakypipe's picture
Leakypipe

Hi, glad you like your new mixer. I bought one last year but can't seem to get the dough to knead correctly. Just wraps round the hook and I have all but given up!

pjaj's picture
pjaj

Hi, dough climb has always been a problem with this type of mixer, my 41 year old model did exactly the same. I believe the Kitchenaid suffers from it as well.

At least in the old model the circular shield at the top of the hook was a continuous piece of nylon (?) molding. The new hook has a stainless steel shield WITH A HOLE IN IT! The dough climbs through the hole into the cup shaped depression into the top of the shield. Why they put a hole in it I don't know, unless it was to allow any liquid accidentally poured into it to drain into the bowl.

Getting back to dough climb, I've just learned to live with it. Stop the mixer 2 or 3 times during kneading and scrape down, trying to rotate dough ball a bit about a horizontal axis so that when you lower the hook again it goes in off centre if possible. I suppose it also depends on hydration. I usually work with doughs at about 60% (900ml water to 1500gr flour) which is fairly stiff. I'm planning to try a ciabatta in the near future, possibly Jason's Quick Coccodrillo Ciabatta Bread.

Ruralidle's picture
Ruralidle

I have been using a KM020 for about 4 years now and I am very pleased with it.  Yes, the dough will climb the hook, particularly for lower hydration recipes but it generally does a good job.  I even use it as a liquidizer (I got the glass one with it) and also use it for grinding meat and stuffing sausages.  All in all, a very good all-purpose mixer - but not as good as a spiral for bread dough.

Leakypipe's picture
Leakypipe

Thanks for replying. Nice to know it is a common issue! I will try your suggestions and persevere. I generally have hydration around 68% to 70% so it will be more challenging. Recently I have been experimenting  with  "no-kneed" techniques as suggested by Dan Lepard with some success so perhaps less mixing with the Kenwood might be may next move.

 

 

sandydog's picture
sandydog

I have used this mixer for about two years, to make bread at home, and think it is really good. The larger (Than my old Kenwood) size bowl allows me to make 2Kg batch size dough in the 60-75% hydration range - This fits my plans to make 500g or 1Kg loaves perfectly without putting undue strain on the motor.

Whilst the user manual says to use lowest speed and speed 1, for most breads, I have found that if I scrape the dough down then turn it up to speed 2 or 3 for the final couple of minutes of mixing, then the dough will come down and away from the dough hook a little, and I both see and hear the dough slapping against the side of the bowl - This gives me great gluten development and, I think, approximates to the "Improved" mix method advocated by many of the well known bread experts on TFL and elsewhere. 

 Of course, I will feel pretty silly (Not to mention having to buy a replacement) if my mixer seriously overloads as a result of my ignoring the manual - But "So far, so good"

Brian

 

pjaj's picture
pjaj

Yes, I too found that speed 2 was necessary to get good kneeding.

I have a cheap watt meter that plugs into the 13A socket between the mains and the machine. It can also measure Volts, Amps, VA, Power factor and frequency. It's showing less than 300W at this speed. A very brief burst at full speed and it clock nearly 700W, so it's hardly overloaded at setting 2. Stramge that Kenwood claim a 1500W motor. I wonder what you have to be mixing to get it to draw that much power? For the technically minded amongst us I also noted that the power factor was less than 0.5 and the VA drawn was about twice the wattage. Maybe someone at Kenwood doesn't know the difference between Watts and VA?!

But then KA have similar confusing claims about their mixers, at different points in their description of the 6.9L model you can find 1.3HP (roughly 1,000 watts) but in the fine print it says 0.44HP motor (about 330 watts) in one place and 575 watts in another.