The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

3-Stage Detmolder 80% Rye from Hamelman's "Bread"

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

3-Stage Detmolder 80% Rye from Hamelman's "Bread"

It has been almost a year since I last baked this bread. (See Three-Stage 80% Sourdough Rye Bread from Hamelman's "Bread" for the formula and method.) It is very similar to the 70% rye in Bread and to "Hansjoakim's Favorite 70% Rye," both of which are delicious. I do believe that this bread, which uses the "3-stage Detmolder" technique for elaborating the rye sour, yields a slightly better flavor than any other high-percentage rye breads I have baked. The Brød and Taylor Proofing Box makes the necessary temperature control easy. 

I slightly over-proofed this loaf. By time I transferred it to the peel for loading, some of the dough stuck to the bottom of the brotform. The dough had a consistancy reminiscent of chocolate mouse. For fear it would stick to the peel, even with a heavy dusting of semolina, I transferred it to parchment paper. Miraculously, the loaf kept it's shape. It didn't have much oven spring, but it didn't collapse. I baked this 1800 g loaf at 490 dF for 10 minutes, the first 5 with steam. I then lowered the temperature to 410 dF and baked for another 60 minutes. This resulted in a darker crust than my previous bake and a better crust consistancy and flavor, to my taste. While the profile was lower than my previous bake, the end result was more than satisfactory.

After cooling for 4 hours, I wrapped the loaf in baker's linen and let it cure for about 40 hours before slicing it.

The crust was chewy and the crumb was tender and almost creamy. The flavor was sweet and earthy with the barest sour tang. It was just delicious plain and with a thin spread of sweet butter. I'm hoping I can get some cold smoked salmon to go with this tomorrow, if not, it's pretty darned good with pickled herring too.

I know the recipes for 3-stage Detmolder rye breads look rather formidable on first reading, but they are really not too demanding, if you plan the schedule of rye sour elaborations to fit other demands and you can get comfortable handling high-percentage rye doughs. (Shaping with a wet board and wet hands is highly recommended!) The results are certainly worth the challenge. If you asked for a few examples of "real bread" - the antithesis of supermarket, cotton wool, pre-sliced, packaged in plastic white bread - this would certainly be among them.

Happy baking!

David

Comments

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Wow David.  I can just imagine the mouth feel and flavour of this one.  i bet that crust has a real robust strong rye flavour.

I haven't had the guts to go above a 50% rye other than the Danish and Swedish ryes.  When comes time to venture to the 70% + range, I will be sure to refer to you.

John

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

I recently found that cheddar is amazing with strong flavoured ryes.  Especially one like this with a dark deep crust.  Aged cheddar is best.

John

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

That does sound good. I was planning on making a Mexican beans with cheese dish this week. I use Tillamook for that, and I'll save some to try on rye. Hmmmm ... I love grilled cheese sandwiches made with Jewish Sour Rye. I wonder how this would work. It can't be bad.

David

isand66's picture
isand66

I'm sure some pastrami or corned beef would work also!

isand66's picture
isand66

Looks fantastic David.

I have tried the Detmolder method before but not as a Miche like this one.  So many nice Miche's posted it's hard to pick one.  I have some of Varda's rye starter from our get together so I think I will have to use it to make this soon.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

David.  It has to taste just a good.  Nice baking as usual.

Our company distributed Tillamook all over the country. I think it was their 85th Anniversary when they releaased their 5 year old black wax Sharp Cheddar Reserve in a tin.  We aged cheese for many cheese makers but this maker is special and their reserve cheddar was one we aged (a small amount of for out own personal use) an addtional 3 more years before slicing it thin.  It nearly evaporated before hitting your tongue and all you got was the flavor and aroma.  Never had anything close to it and we will never see it again.  Tillamook can make some outstanding cheeses and they are fine folks too.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

It's a small world.

I visited the Tillamook dairy the first time in 1952, and the next time in about 2004. It had changed. My son and DIL have a time share on the Oregon coast about an hour from the dairy, and we have visited it a number of times in recent years. Their ice cream is as good as their cheese. Maybe not as good on rye bread, but I havn't tried it.

David

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi David,

Beautiful loaf.  Mostly I am impressed though that you were able to leave this untouched for 40 hours!!!!

I agree with you about the 3 stage sour build.  It does look daunting on the page but doing it really is quite simple.  The other 3 stage leaven build I like is the one in ITJB that is used for the Jewish Deli Rye.  Produces a great flavor as well.

Thanks for the post of your latest bake.

Janet

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Well, I did have the SJSD baguettes to distract me. ;-)

David

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Most impressive, David! Just look at that beautifully even crumb structure. Great to see your bold, assertive bakes as well, David, as the crust contributes so much flavour. Combined with your SJSD baguettes (or any other shape baked from that same formula of yours), these would truly define what real bread is all about.

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I am very pleased with this bake.

I was delighted, on arriving home from my Italian class tonight, when my wife reported she had had a slice, untoasted, with almond butter and found it delicious. I'm going to convert her to a rye lover yet! (Besides, I'm going to need her help consuming this big loaf.) Converting her to a pickled herring lover may be a lost cause.

David

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

David! You make me feel *very* guilty for having neglected my high rye adventures for so long, last  was 2 months ago. I'll return to the dark side, after all it's where I belong.

Really nice! With almost butter it much be outrageously good.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The appropriate penance for your sin is, of course, to make a high-rye bread and enjoy it.

David

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

That crumb shot is just so ...inviting!  The shape and crust is right on target!  Description of flavour is enough to make me fetch more flour before the store opens.  (We ate up the last of our rye yesterday.  I inoculated a starter and realized I had only 400g of 14% protein rye.)  

"Chocolate mousse"  mind if I borrow that?  The likeness is perfectly discriptive of ready to bake rye!  Baking parchment releases beautifully for a nice lower curve on the loaves (whistle) love that!   

Your baguette featured post has me squirming to make my first baguettes since China!  I am soooo rusty!

Have you tried a thin spread of your favorite mustard over that thin spread of salt-free butter?

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I would happily share my chocolate mouse with you!

I always appreciate your very specific comments. So, you don't think the loaf was really over-proofed?

I have never tried mustard on butter. We are going to have some smoked chicken and apple sausages one day this week. That sounds like an opportunity to try your suggestion. I usually have a spicy-honey mustard with those sausages.

David

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Just look at the bubbles. Nicely rounded and nicely spaced. Not many popping into each other. Over-proofed looks different.

Got that flour now. I seem to have two kinds one with 14% protein and one with 10% protein. I like the flavour of the 14 more, they both look the same and ferment about the same. The better tasting is half the price! :)

Mini

Faith in Virginia's picture
Faith in Virginia

I have made this many times myself and your description of chocolate mousse is spot on.  After my rye class in Vermont I noticed none of his doughs have that consistency.  I don't remember off hand the hydrations of those doughs but none the less if feels like my rye flour may not have the same absorption as the rye in his formula and therefore getting the mousse that wants to stick.

Wet dough’s are not a problem...just wondering if you think this dough is overly wet for the said hydration of the formula?  I was thinking of stiffening it up a bit on the next go around.

Noticed you docked your 80% also.

BTW almost forgot. Nice looking loaf

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Frankly, I don't recall the dough consistancy of other bakes of this particular bread. This dough was very slack - more a batter than a dough. The results suggest the hydration was not a problem. Thanks for sharing your experience.

I used KAF Medium Rye. 

The other high-percentage ryes I have made from "Bread" have not been this wet. I prefer the moist crumb of this one to some of the others I've baked.

I did dock the loaf, fearing bursting of this fragile dough. I didn't get any, but that was probably due to the borderline over-proofing and modest oven spring.

David

David

isand66's picture
isand66

David what did you use for the high gluten flour?  I am about to mix the dough up now and will probably use KAF Sir Gallahad flour but I'm curious if you used that high of a gluten flour.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I used KAF Sir Lancelot (14% protein). Sir Galahad is KAF AP flour (11.5-11.7% protein).  

If you use Sir Galahad, you might want to hold back some of the water or you will be dealing with soup. Or maybe you need to give the Round Table another spin. Watch out. Those knights can be hard to tell apart when fully armored. ;-)

David

isand66's picture
isand66

Oops....I am losing what's left of my memory....I used the same one you did Sir Lancelot.

I'm taking it out of the oven in about 1 minute.  Smells great...looks great....guess i will have to wait a couple of days to see how it tastes.

Thanks for your help.

Ian

pepperhead212's picture
pepperhead212

I made this a month or so ago, but mine was much dryer than yours sounds, and did not rise as much.  Originally, I thought maybe it was due to the fact that I used whole rye, and maybe that absorbs more moisture, so I just made a note about it.  The moisture of the rye starter could not have mattered, given the small amount started with!    

That idea of the Mexican beans and cheese with rye sounds interesting - combining two of my favorite foods, rye and Mexican!  I'll have to try others, when I have bread sitting around, and cooking Mexican.

Dave 

 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Nice even crumb for 80% rye, David!

The thing that deters me most from high% Rye breads are the accompaniments. I'd love to have this bread more often, but i don't easily got hold of fancy toppings like smoken herring or salmon. A cream cheese with some onions/onion springs, would those be nice too?

Anyway David, a wonderful detmolder Rye.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

This bread would be delicious with onion cream cheese! Although it would certainly be an inovative cross-cultural pairing, I don't think it would be bad with a garlicky hummus or babaganoush. Hmmm ... Any smokey eggplant dish should pair well with a dark rye like this, at least in my imagination. 

One of my grandmother's favorite snacks was pumpernickel spread with sour cream.

David

oksana's picture
oksana

Beautiful crump, David. I dont have a book, can you please post the recipie. im a new here, but love to bake a bread. Thank you.

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

A link to the formula and method is in the very first line of the original post's text.

David

oksana's picture
oksana

Thank you, David. 

will defenetly try this bread.

Blacksilk Helen's picture
Blacksilk Helen

The flavor of this and other intense rye breads really comes out in an open face sandwich made with caramelized red onion jam and a strong asiago type cheese.  My local cheesemaker, Chapel Hill creamery, makes one of the best asiago types I've ever had.  It or any other cheese with a strong, sweet and smoky flavor pairs well with the rye.