The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bouchon Bakery - Master Recipe: Baguette Dough for Batards

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MANNA's picture
MANNA

Bouchon Bakery - Master Recipe: Baguette Dough for Batards

Im back. Last night I started the Master Recipe: Baguette Dough for Batards. I made the poolish and let it sit in the oven overnight with the light on. I mixed up the dough this morning and have been letting it bulk ferment. I mixed mine up in the Electrolux Verona and have done some folds on it. I just turned it out and eyeballed splitting it in half. FYI this is a double batch to make two big boules and not batards. Heres why, I will eventually buy (budgeting) some lava rock and cheap pan to try their steam method intill then Im going to use my tried and true cast iron double cooker (Tartine). So here is a pic of the dough resting after dividing and a shrt preshape. Tension looks good and some small bubbles on the surface are visible. I will fold these in awhile and place them in brotforms to final proof. Then bake in the CI double cooker. See you in a-few.

dsadowsk's picture
dsadowsk

Nice pic, suitable for hanging in the Louvre!  And that trick of placing the scraper parallel with the shadows was nice.

Looking forward to more.

MANNA's picture
MANNA

I honestly didn't notice till you pointed it out. I shaped the dough ad got the camera. Just snapped a pic as I left everything after shaping. Thank you for the compliment.

MANNA's picture
MANNA

Bread all baked. Came out very good. Its a 73% hydration loaf. I ran into problems getting them out of the brotforms. I didnt use enough flour and they stuck. I got them out and ito the oven with minimal damage. I didnt time the bake. I just took the top off the CI-cooker after about 15 min. Once the loafs started to brown all over I removed them fron the bottom half of the CI-cooker and placed them on the oven rack to finish cooking. Flavor is good, what you would expect from a bread made with poolish. Crumb has some nice holes. I handled it moderatly so I didnt deflate it to much. Overall your standard bread recipe. One more thing, I baked this bread at 475 derees F. I wanted to get a nice crust without drying the crumb to much. I do so enjoy a nice crusty loaf of bread with a chewy crumb.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

both the loaves and the photos !

Well done !

anna

MANNA's picture
MANNA

Thank you.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and out.  That's some fine baking Manna!  I hope they taste as good as thay look.

Happy baking

 

MANNA's picture
MANNA

Taste is good. I will just have to make sure to flour them more or use rice flour next time to ensure they release from the brotformes cleanly. They did get mis-shapen a bit due to the sticking.

jenkinstn75's picture
jenkinstn75

I am new bread maker and have made wheat, white, and pizza dough everytime learning a little more. I have recently got a grinder to grind fresh flower but I am having the same problem over and over. I have managed to get the outside to brown adn I also like a crust but the middle is thick. I have heard that can come from over useing a bread hook on the KitchenAide so I tried with minimal mixing. Nothing works. I have never let bread proof over night and was thinking maybe I am not letting the bread rise enough??? Any thoughts or help would be great. The bread in this picture is exactly what I am trying to achieve.

 

MANNA's picture
MANNA

What you describe sounds like underproofing. Did your dough double in size? And if it did double in size during thefinal proof then you probaly overproofed and your dough is deflating in the oven. I personally had Chad Robinsons book Tartine. I worked on that for a year. Then I got Jeffery Hammelmans Bread. I now have a book case of books that I brose through for ideas. I pick most of mine up at used book stores. Also, its nearly impossible to overknead with a kitchenaid. I think the mixer would give out before you ruined the dough.

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

You are a brave soul to be doing all this bread baking on your own.  And now to be asking such good questions.  I have some advice you have maybe read from me before:  follow the advice of an expert.  If you cannot take a course at a cooking school, work from a textbook.  That's what professionals do.  You can do that, too, by buying a textbook online and working your way through it.  Otherwise, you're wandering around doing the best that you can.  I STRONGLY recommend finding a text you like and dedicating a year to it, doing all the exercises, answering all the questions.  Pretty soon you'll know more than you do already.

Look at these two:  DiMuzio's Bread Baking and Hamelman's Bread.  They're different from each other.  I wish I'd had the DiMuzio text when I started out.  Hamelman would have put me off.  Others really like it, though, so don't take my advice.  You maybe can find them both in your local library system.  Both are available used at Alibris or Powell's usually.

Remember that until you have a solid base of information you won't know whose answers on this website are worth reading.  Educate yourself!

I also recommend that you stop whatever you're doing and watch all the video's linked at the top of this page.  Then go back to the ones you need later.

And do all the exercises, especially in DiMuzio, if that's the one your choose.

 

 

MANNA's picture
MANNA

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