The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

kitchen scales

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docpat's picture
docpat

kitchen scales

I am looking to purchase a kitchen scale for bread baking. I am looking for one that has a tare feature which will allow me to zero out the reading after each ingredient addition or to negate the weight of the bowl. Finances are a bit of an issue, so I need to find one that does the job at a reasonable price. I am a  home baker and do not require lab quality accuracy, but enough for bread baking purposes. Does any one have recommendations on what they like, don't like, things to look for, brand names, etc. Thanks in advance for your help. ~Docpat

sphealey's picture
sphealey

The MyWeigh i5000 (or i2500) runs $45-$55 US online and meets your requirements.

There have been several threads discussing scale choices recently - you might want to try searching the site.

sPh

staff of life's picture
staff of life

If you go on Rose Levy Berenbaum's site, she has an article about the MyWeigh scales.

 SOL

breadnerd's picture
breadnerd

I just got a myweigh, and like it.  The Escali scale was also recommended to me:

 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/3964/scale-breadnerd

 

And that one is less expensive (around $25), and also more compact.  I like my myweigh, but I think I would have been just as happy with the escali. 

edh's picture
edh

My only advice is to make sure you get something that's good to 1 gram; my Salter is only good to 2 grams, and it drives me nuts. Makes weighing things like salt and yeast really difficult, if not impossible.

edh

goetter's picture
goetter

Thanks for the pointer to the RLB forum, SOL.  Nice thread over there.  Nice threads over here, too.  Seek and ye shall find.

As I've said in other threads here, I'm a satisfied Escali Primo user.  It is inexpensive, reasonably accurate, uses common batteries, and is very compact (important in a mini ship's galley type kitchen like I sometimes use).  Indeed, it is so compact that it doesn't work well with the bowl of (arguably) the best kitchen-machine for small kitchens, the Bosch Concept 7000.  The bottom of the Bosch's mixing bowl is concave, and wider than the measuring plate on the Escali, enough so that you cannot place the bowl directly on the measuring plate.  If you enlarge the Escali's measuring plate by placing a dinner plate or baking pan on it, it becomes very difficult to read the non-backlit display under the plate's overhang.  So there are drawbacks to compactness, sometimes.

I still like the Primo a lot for my mini kitchen.  But for the larger kitchen, I may treat myself to a slightly larger scale someday.

docpat's picture
docpat

Thanks all for your info. It was very helpful and I especially liked the pointer to the RLB site.

rideold's picture
rideold

I have a polder (model 933-81) that goes up to 11 lbs and measures to the gram.  You can get them for under $40.  My only complaint is that with a big bowl the readout is hard to see but oh well.  It has worked great for me for a year now with use 2-3 times a week.