The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Tartine whole wheat

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swifty's picture
swifty

Tartine whole wheat

I have been making bread by following Chad Robertson after getting frustrated Peter Reinhart's Whole grain Breads. Not that its a great book, it's just that I don't bake frequently enough to follow  his terms like preferment,poolish,soaker and what ever.

The missing information is the instructions for whole wheat bread p. 114 ,some bakers prefer an overnight rest for whole-grains as long as you wait to add the leaven until you give it a couple of turns. This sounds like you give the flour and water and over-night rest then add the leaven and knead it all together. Is this what Cad is saying, and what do you do?

FYI I just did a long bulk fermentation in my cool basement at 62 degrees over 6 hours then gave it a bench rest with plenty of stretch and fold, then in the proofing baskets lined with parchment paper,covered with plastic wrap to prevent drying out and placed in the refregrator for 16 hours , placed in kitchen for 3 hours to warm up and then bake.

pjkobulnicky's picture
pjkobulnicky

Go straight from the fridge to the oven.

1. In warm weather you can cause water in the air to condense on the proofed loaf.

2. It is MUCH easier to handle proofed dough when itis cold and much easier to score it.

AND

No ... you proof dough overnight AFTER you add the levain and AFTER you give it the turns.

 

swifty's picture
swifty

thanks

swifty's picture
swifty

I appreciate your comment,however it's not what the book said. You missed the point. The book suggest hydrating the flour for 24 hours then add the leaven. I have used other recipes that do it just the opposite. Also, most seem to suggest letting the doug return to room temperature before putting in the oven. I really don't know the answer. You may be correct on this.

I know very well the process and steps for baking bread. The catch is when you are working with a bread that is 80% whole wheat flour and trying to delay the fermentation to build flavor, how do you prevent the crust from being too leathery. I covered with plastic wrap and put the proofing basket in the refregrator for about 14 hours. I am looking for a more dense bread with a crisp but not leathery tough crust.