The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Potato bread rolls

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VonildaBakesBread's picture
VonildaBakesBread

Potato bread rolls

Can anyone tell me what a good hydration for a potato bread dough would be, one that would be made into dinner rolls?

 

Thanks!

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

flakes and accounting for any hydration in the butter at 20% water (if you are using butter), then I would think that 66-70% hydration would be fine, even up to 72% if you like working with wetter dough.  Water with roasted or maashed potatoes is harder to calculate adn better to go by feel.  Do you have a recipe in mind or using one from TFL?

Hope this helps

VonildaBakesBread's picture
VonildaBakesBread

Great starting point. I have a recipe from my grandmother (quite the baker--wish I'd spent more time with her as teen!). The recipe simply does not list how much flour. "I don't know--till it's right" were her directions if you asked her. I'm not sure how to tell "if it's right," so I was hoping to get a good idea by figuring BP's. It lists "mashed potatoes" so, I'm guessing that means real, not flakes.

Procrastixote's picture
Procrastixote

Remember that boiled potatoes are about 80% water. This means that 400 grams of boiled potatoes contains about 320 grams of water. Rose Levy Berenbaum says that a loaf of bread can have up to 15% of its weight replaced by potato without effecting the rise of the bread too negatively. With this in mind, I have lately been making bread with about 520 grams of flour to about 400 grams of boiled, mashed potatoes and only about 300 further grams/milliliters of water added. That produces a slightly damp dough, but not an unworkable one, in my experience. If you're lacking measurements, what I've been doing might be a good place for you to start as well, though I'm afraid I'm not sure of the hydration percentage. I must add a disclaimer to all this, though: I'm pretty new to baking, still experimenting a lot, so I'm sure someone can give you better advice than what I've given. Anyway, I hope your recipe works out!