The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Crider Sells Out

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Crider's picture
Crider

Crider Sells Out

I'm approaching the age of sixty and I've been baking regularly for about ten years and doing it by hand. But a bug got in my soup more than two years ago when txfarmer posted the breathtaking blog "Sourdough Pan de Mie - how to make "shreddably" soft bread". She wrote and demonstrated about intensive kneading and how that was the secret to those amazing loaves. She showed different windowpane characteristics which developed as she cranked her mixer for rather long periods of time.

I was intrigued, to say the least. I even played around with long-time kneading by hand. I remember how I spent fifty minutes hand kneading a white dough until it finally showed signs of over-kneading. Not practical. A mixer is definitely needed for that kind of thing. But I never really liked the way home mixers appear to beat the hell out of the dough. It seems they spin way too fast, especially compared to commercial mixers, and especially compared to fork mixers and falling arm mixers. There were (are?) actual countertop falling arm mixers Artofex made. Santos still makes a fork mixer that gently turns the dough. It sells in the US, but $1,200? Not only couldn't I afford something like that, I'd rather use that kind of money to lie on a warm beach in Hawaii right now.

The truth, probably, is that these home mixers really aren't being harsh on the dough at all and I'm just clinging to my superstitious hand-knead ways. Temptation came when I saw a video on Youtube of somebody demonstrating a little Bosch MUM 4 Compact mixer, and when they turned it to speed one to incorporate the ingredients, it was slow — real slow. I loved that! I downloaded the manual for that machine to see if it is willing to operate on speed one indefinitely. It is!

Weird thing is, Bosch USA still doesn't admit they sell the things. All they feature on their website are the big MUM 6 Universals. But Pleasant Hill Grain happily sells them whenever they have some to sell. One ninety nine! You could get six MUM 4s for the price of one Santos fork mixer . . .

When it arrived I didn't have any flour milled or sourdough started for a big loaf, but I did have a sack of all-purpose white flour in the cupboard and yeast in the 'fridge. What could be more fun than a sandwich loaf? Haven't made a white sandwich loaf in years. I didn't do txfarmer's Pen de Mie, but I did a lean loaf at 65% hydration. I stood there and stared at the mixer for fifteen minutes as it gently, very gently kneaded the dough round and round on speed one. It was fun watching. Do you all stare at your mixer when it's kneading? Could have gone longer, but maybe next time. The dough felt and handled wonderful. Flour, water, salt & yeast. Why do supermarket bakeries refuse do make a simple sandwich loaf like this?

 

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

If all sandwich bread looked like that then there wouldn't be any other kind!

It is nice to see such great baking and writing.  I'm going the other way - French slap and folds for me :-)

 

Crider's picture
Crider

Thanks! I don't blame you one bit for sticking to hand kneading.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

:) nice sound too.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

 

I started my day with a great chuckle! I am not alone in the world with my strange affliction! I love watching my mixer and how the dough changes characteristcs!I also love looking at pictures of wonderful loaves of bread such as your beautiful sandwich loaf. Very nice!

My Kitchen Aid is 36 yrs old and I keep telling my husband it is a very important tool that WILL be replaced when necessary. I will have to look into that mixer.

Crider's picture
Crider

36 years old. That's amazing. Maybe you could still get some parts if it broke?

varda's picture
varda

Think you'll really enjoy selling out.   Nice sandwich bread!  Is a Bosch Compact same as a Bosch MUM?   -Varda

 

Crider's picture
Crider

The Compact is MUM 4, there's a bigger one like the Compact that is the MUM 5. Then there is the Universal which is the MUM 6, and there's the MUM 8, which is large & powerful but based on the same design as the Compact. I'm loving the mixer so far. I did a 1,200 gram whole wheat dough at 85% hydraton for about 20 minutes. I was amazed how well the glutin developed on that fresh-ground wheat and I didn't have to fight getting sticky hands!

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Nice loaf!  Isn't it a terrific little mixer?  Superb engineering and I think one of its many benefits is its lightness.  Can easily pick it up with one hand.   Try that with a KA.

BTW, you're not selling out at all, Crider.  Think of it as a more efficient use of your time.  

Crider's picture
Crider

but that's because the bowl doesn't lock into place. It's designed to move around slightly. The flimsy thing was a concern of mine when I ordered it. The motor seems quite strong, however.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Though the largest majority of my breads are hand mixed.  I absolutely love this little mixer.  It has so many +'s....  I just made a lovely light 'pastry whole wheat flour' carrot cake yesterday, using my BC!

Sylvia 

 

Crider's picture
Crider

that there's so many Bosch Compact owners here!

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

I didn't know about MUMs.  When were they added to Bosch collection of mixers?  I wonder if they are styles that have always been available in Europe? The only one available here about 2 years ago when I bought my first mixer was the Universal but I sure didn't like the center column or how it kneaded doughs so I bought a DLX and love it but did buy the Compact Bosch when I learned about them somehow (Yes, they are hard to come by here in the US) and love it for lean doughs when I do single loaves plus my daughter loves it for cookies and cakes etc.  I love it's lightness - how easy it is to lift and store.  And yes, the price can't be beat!

Nice loaf :-)

Janet

Crider's picture
Crider

when I visited the German Bosch website. It seems they don't offer every mixer in every country. I can see there would be a problem making or finding a special 110 volt motor for the US market that matched the characteristics of the 220 volt motors they use in the rest of the world.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

That makes sense.  I sure like the looks of the stainless MUM5. Nice and compact and sleek too.  Thanks for the link.

Janet

RIMADDOG's picture
RIMADDOG

WOW., Your bread looks beautiful.

Wondering if you can help me, or know someone that could ?

I an new to this, and i have bought a 5 qt cast iron dutch oven.

I would love to start baking breads in it , but i don't know the first thing to do as most recipes i see call for grams etc.. i need regular measurements " USA ", LOL

I would love to make Seeded Rye Bread in my dutch oven, but would like to do it withour sourdough and also have it Lactose Free.

If  you can help, please reply back to me, or if you know someone that could help me, please pass this onto them.

Thanks so very much.

Crider's picture
Crider

Sure, USA measurements used to be oz. and lbs., but all the scales these days have both grams and ounces. Bakers have always used scales to put together their loaves. But were you thinking of cups? One cup of my flour doesn't weigh the same as your cup of flour, so our loaves are guaranteed to come out differently.

Anyway, Mark Bittman of the New York Times published a great article on no-knead bread that attracted a lot of attention. It's fun, and it uses cups:

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/081mrex.html?_r=0

Here's a Youtube video of him demonstrating the no-knead loaf:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13Ah9ES2yTU

Check out articles on this site and you'll learn a lot. Have fun!

 

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

What temperature are you baking your Sandwich loaf at please?

Cheers,

Wingnut

Crider's picture
Crider

I heated the oven to 425° F, and then turned it down to 375° after I put the loaf in.

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Thanks for the info.

Wingnut